Benign Roladric Epilepsy

Benign Rolandic Epilepsy

epilepsy ribbon

What is Benign Rolandic Epilepsy?

Benign Rolandic Epilepsy is a type of seizure that affects primary children. It is referred to as “Benign” since most children grow out of it during puberty and “Rolandic” describes the part of the brain where seizures begin.

Other know names:

  • benign focal epilepsy
  • benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BCECETS)
  • benign rolandic epilepsy of childhood (BREC)
  • benign epilepsy with centro-temporal spikes (BECTS)

How Common is Benign Rolandic Epilepsy?

Benign Rolandic Epilepsy (BRE) is considered one of the most common types of epilepsy children will experience. It generally begins between the ages of 3 and 13 and peaks around the age of 7-8 and will stop around the ages of 14-18 (puberty). Children usually do well with this type of seizure although some may experience learning disability including reading, language and drawing.

Symptoms

  • A feeling of tingling on one side of the mouth which involves the tongue, lips, gums and inner side of cheek.
  • Generally begins when the child is sleeping or wakes up in the morning characterized by occurring in clusters and long intervals with no seizure activity.
  • twitching movements on one side of the face.
  • May make gurgling sounds.
  • Drooling and the inability to speak.
  • Day time seizures may be infrequent and typically last less than 2 minutes.
  • May spread from the rolandric area to the rest of the brain which becomes a tonic-clonic  seizures.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis are done through an accurate history of the seizures and an electroencephalogram (EEG) test, which picks up seizure activity.

Treatment

In most cases, children may not take any medication since the seizures end around puberty. May be treated with anti-epileptic drugs including:

  • Carbamazepine
  • Levetiracetam
  • Oxcarbazepine

How professionals can help

  • Recognize the signs of seizures
  • Teachers should be aware that a child may often feel tired and sleepy afterwards for hours
  • There may be learning difficulties and behavior problems

Resources

 

 

 

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