September Special Needs Article Links

Welcome to the September links. These are articles that I tweeted and or received from viewers during the month of September on special needs and developmental disability topics. Enjoy!

specialneedslinks

3 ways technology can help students with autism (Ed Tech Magazine)

5 ways autism makes me a cool dad (Autism Speaks)

10 things to never say to parents of a child with sensory processing disorder (Daily America)

Autism: Useful tips for school teachers back to school (HuffPost Parents)

Doctors are failing to spot Asperger’s in girls (The Guardian)

Myrtle Beach airport opens room for children with autism (The State)

Parents of children with autism face ‘exhausting battles’ to get educational support (HuffPost Parents)

Play therapy helps children with ADHD build social skills (ADDitude Magazine)

Student with autism now the ‘most popular kid in the room’ after visit from Florida State Player (Fox 61)

The ABC’s of Cerebral Palsy (Yahoo News)

Timing is key to understanding sensory, social issues in autism (Spectrum News)

The gifted brain and sensory processing disorder (Genealogy Jen)

Top ten apps to help improve the lives of as children (Yu-Kai Chou)

When children are diagnosed with a sensory disorder (Wall Street Journal)

When kids sit alone (The Atlantic)

Why I’m done worrying about grade levels and deficits (Scary Mommy)

Advertisements

What Kind of Visual Schedule Do I Need?

Knowing what kind of visual schedule a student needs is a tough question we all deal with in special education and autism. Some students can use pictures or even written schedules while others need object schedules. I'm sharing my decision-making process for deciding where to start and when/how to make changes.

 

 

 

Source: Autism Classroom Resources

Have you ever wondered how to decide what kind of visual schedule to use for your students? There are so many types of visual schedules from object schedules, picture schedules, photo schedules to written schedules.  Knowing which type is best for which students can be a difficult process.  We don’t have a ton of guidelines about how to make decisions other than trial and error.  However, I thought I would share my process to give some tips of where to start. Click here to read the rest of the article

 

 

 

 

Study: Moms Face Greater Risk of Heart Disease

Raising a child with autism may take a deeper toll than previously thought with new research suggesting that such moms face a heightened risk of heart disease.

Mothers of kids on the spectrum who have chronic stress were more likely than less-stressed moms of neurotypical children to experience cardiovascular risk factors. Click here to read the rest of the story

Cerebral Palsy History Timeline

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), cerebral palsy is the most common motor disability in childhood. About I in 323 children are diagnosed each year. Although more than likely, cerebral palsy has been around for years, it was not until the 19th century that cerebral palsy was given a name. Here are some key events in cerebral palsy history.

cptimeline

1810- Dr. William John Little is credited with first identifying spastic diplegia is born.

1836- Louis Stromeyer corrects John Little’s club foot. This discovery begins a career in understanding and treating childhood impairments.

1843- Dr. William John Little begins lecturing on spastic ridgity.

1853. Dr. William John Little publishes On the Nature and Treatment of the Deformities of the Human Frame.

1861- Dr. William John Little establishes the classic definition of spastic cerebral palsy.

1889- William Osler, one of the founding professors of John Hopkins Hospital, wrote the book, Cerebral Palsies of Children

1937- Herbert A. Everest and Harry Jennings Sr., built a lightweight collapsible wheelchair.

1937- The Children’s Rehabilitation Insitute is founded by Dr. Winthrope Phelps specializing in children with cerebral palsy.

1897- Dr. Freud states cerebral palsy may be caused by fetal development

1946- Cerebral Palsy of New York State founded by parents of children with cerebral palsy.

1948- United Cerebral Palsy is incorporated.

1949- United Cerebral Palsy founded by Leonard Goldenson, his wife Isabel, Nina Eaton and Jack and Ethel Hausman.

2002-  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) conducts first U.S. multi-state study on the prevalence.

EPIPEN

epipen

The EpiPen’s sudden price increase has received an onslaught of media coverage leading to a congressional hearing held yesterday. Currently, 43 million people are at risk for experiencing a life-threatening allergic reaction  concerning the spike in cost of the EpiPen over the years since 2004:

2004- $106.32
2005- $106.96
2006- $107.76
2007- $108.96
2008- $110.18
2009- $116.01
2010- $150.76
2011- $176.50
2012- $208.84
2013- $273.24
2014- $354.94
2015- $468.06
2016- $608.61

An EpiPen (short for Epinephrine) is often used in life-threatening emergencies to treat allergic reactions to insect stings such as bees, yellow jackets and hornets. When a person is stung by an insect, the normal reaction includes swelling and redness around the site. There are those however that experience an allergic reaction, also know as an anaphylactic reaction. Other serious allergic reactions may include foods such as eggs, milk, peanuts, shellfish and wheat. The symptoms of a severe allergic reaction include: trouble breathing, a rash, difficulty swallowing. dizziness, heart palpitations and  chest discomfort.

EpiPens are pre-filled and delivers medication into the muscle of the outer thigh. The injection reduces swelling of the throat and face, stimulates the heart and raises the blood pressure. Anyone that uses the auto injector, should still be checked out by a health care specialist.

First Week Activities in Special Education

Source: Breezy Special Ed

How do you start the first week in a special education class? I’ve been asked this question a lot lately, and understandably why! I think every teacher, no matter how long they have been teaching, has some sort of nightmares or sleepless nights about the first day/weeks (am I right?!). Click here for the rest of the article

Why Autistics Emotions May Go Unrecognized

Young boy looking at his mother

Source: VeryWell

Anyone who knows someone with autism knows that — of course! — people with autism have feelings. Sometimes very strong feelings. Just like everyone else. People with autism can be happy, sad, excited, depressed, frustrated, or angry.But…The myth that “people with autism are emotionless” persists Why? There are a few reasons; some good and some — pretty silly.  For example: Read the rest of the story here.

National Conference on Special Needs Trusts

ST. PETERSBURG BEACH, FLORIDA: 2010 Special Needs Trust Conference presented by the Stetson University College of Law at the Don Cesar. Photos by Matt May/Stetson College of Law

On October 19-21, 2016, the National Conference on Special Needs Trusts and Special Needs Planning will present a conference on Special Needs Trusts. A Pre-conference will be held, October 19, 2016 on tax issues in special needs planning.

The conference will be held:
The Vinoy Renaissance St. Petersburg Resort and Golf Club
St. Petersburg, Florida

You can learn more about the conference here

Home Schooling Your Special Needs Child

Since the early 1900’s, home schooling children in the United States has continue to grow in leaps and bounds. Many parents have decided to educate their children at home for many reasons including protecting their children from bullies, concerned with the academic instruction, the ability to give their special needs child one on one attention and having control over their child’s education.

home_schooling.2

Currently, 5% of children being home schooled have special needs. The are a number of resources available to provide parents with support:

Homeschooling a Struggling Learner– provides regulations for each state. The rules vary for each state. A few States require that local officials are notified on the intend of home schooling your child, while other may require assessment test.

The following sites provide law information:

Assessment and Intervention

Home School Notification Quick Facts

Homeschool Options

Instruction Time and Subject Requirements

Parent Qualifications Quick Facts

Record Keeping

Special Needs

The following are articles on home school and special needs

Homeschooling Special Needs

Special needs child thrives by homeschooling

Resources

HSLDA– Non-profit advocacy organization established to defend the right of parents.