FILM REVIEW: THE ACCOUNTANT — Grady P Brown – Author

I saw The Accountant starring Ben Affleck today and I must say that it is one of the most relatable films I have seen in recent years. The reason for this is because Ben Affleck plays someone who has high-functioning autism. As someone who has lived with autism all his life and serves as an […]

via FILM REVIEW: THE ACCOUNTANT — Grady P Brown – Author

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Clothespin Games: An Affordable Sensory Tool

clothespin games

 

 

 

 

 

Source: Special-Ism

The original purpose of clothespins is for hanging up clothes to dry on a line.  But did you know that the simple little clothespins in either plastic or wood can be an inexpensive tool that provides heavy work for the hands? In addition to heavy work (proprioceptive input), clothespins can offer fine and gross motor input.  Let’s explore the idea of using clothespins as a sensory tool in a variety of clothespin games. Click here to read the ret of the story

Halloween Art Activities

halloween

Besides trick or treating, Halloween provides a great opportunity to participate in some fun art and craft activities. Each of the craft activities provide multi-sensory opportunities. The following activities are items easily found around the home.

Bottle Bats– Halloween bat made from recycled materials

Craft Sticks Spider Web– Create a spider web using craft sticks

Halloween Coloring Pages-Several coloring sheets with a Halloween theme.

Halloween Lesson Ideas– A website that contains several lesson plan ideas

How to carve a pumpkin– A lesson plan with a step by step guide on carving a pumpkin

Lollipop Ghosts– Using lollipops to create an inexpensive treat

Mosaic Pumpkins– easy to make pumpkin design

Paper Plate Spiders– Create spiders using regular paper plates

Paper Plate Witch– Create a paper plate witch using your own hands

Pasta Skeleton– A skeleton made by gluing dried pasta on black paper

Pastel Spider Webs– Art lesson that focuses on lines, shapes and colors

Pumpkin Candleholder– An easy to make pumpkin candle holder

Trick or Treat Jug– Create a jack o’ lantern using a milk carton

 

Art Projects for Disabled Adults

Art therapy allows those who are disabled to have a voice.
Source: EHow

Art therapy can give disabled adults a sense of personal accomplishment, whether they have a mental, physical or emotional disability. Art projects can help to improve a person’s outlook on life, give voice to unexpressed emotions — especially for those with developmental disabilities — or provide a way to make some extra money selling artistic works. When Pablo Picasso said, “Art washes from the soul the dust of everyday life,” he wasn’t just referring to art’s beholders, but those who create it as well. Click here for the rest of the story

Call for Submissions: Knots: An Undergraduate Journal of Disability Studies #3 — Disability Research Forum

Journal: Knots: An Undergraduate Journal of Disability Studies Submissions Due: 1st January 2017 Description: The Equity Studies program (at New College, University of Toronto) invites submissions for the next issue of Knots: An Undergraduate Journal of Disability Studies. Knots is a peer-reviewed journal that highlights high-calibre work by undergraduate students, and undergraduate alumni*, which moves […]

via Call for Submissions: Knots: An Undergraduate Journal of Disability Studies #3 — Disability Research Forum

My ADHD Story and What You Can Do


Source: The Bender Bunch

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, known as ADHD is a behavioral condition that affects nearly 11% of our student population. These children are typically very impulsive, hyper, and struggle to pay attention and remain on task.

You may say, “Well that’s me.” Many of us have difficulties paying attention when something doesn’t interest us, or sometimes we may feel hyper. I do! But children with ADHD struggle so much with these behaviors that it often takes over and affects every aspect of their life; home, school, and their social life. Click here for the rest of the story.

Understanding Medicaid Waiver Services

Medicaid.gov - Keeping America Healthy

Home and Community-Based services Waiver allows people with long-term such as disabilities to receive services in a home or community setting. The goal of the waiver program is to enable States to tailor services to meet the needs of a particular group. Standard services can include case management, home health aide, adult day habilitation and respite care. The Federal and State Governments jointly fund and administers the program. At the Federal level, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) administers the program. Each State administer its Medicaid program in accordance with CMS approved State plan. Each State is allowed a great amount of flexibility in designing and operation it its Medicaid program as long as it complies with the Federal requirements.

 

Activity Ideas for Developmental Disabled Adults

Board games.
Source: E-How

When it comes to activities, disabled adults have distinctive needs. Unlike average adults, disabled people may require the help of respite workers to do certain activities. However, the needs of disabled adults are not always comparable to those of disabled children because many disabled adults are sexually mature and socially competent. Many activities meet the needs of developmentally disabled adults. Click here to read the rest of the story

Transition Planning Timeline

One of the goals of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act is to include transition planning services for all special education students at age 16. Transition planning is mandated through IDEA 2004 which serves to help students begin the process of preparing for post-school activities including, postsecondary education, vocational education, integrated employment and adult services. A timeline will help you stay focused on achieving each step.

The law states transition planning should begin no later than 16 years old or before. It is recommended transition planning should begin by age 14 since services are different in the adult services world including long waiting list depending on where you live and what services are available.

14 Years Old
  • Transition planning should begin no later than when your child is 14.4- It is the law in most states.
  • Begin to research agencies who provide services for individuals with disabilities
  • IEP meeting should focus on the student’s needs, interest in preparation for adulthood
  • Research various aspects of transition services
  • Begin to explore recreation activities
15 Years Old
  • Develop a vision statement
  • Transition goals should be part of the IEP
  • Begin to discuss home services
  • Attend information fairs that offer information on future planning including residential, guardianship and employment
  • Start planning an independence plan at home where possible
16 Years Old
  • Transition goals at the IEP meetings should be updated.
  • Confirm how long students will attend high school- 4 years or until age 21
  • Start the process of getting referrals to your state agency
  • Begin researching adult services and programs. Some waitlist can last for years
  • Initiate application to adult service agencies
17 Years Old
  • Confirm a graduation date
  • Update transition goals in the IEP
  • Begin to invite adult service providers to IEP
  • Begin to investigate guardianship information and the process
18 Years Old
  • Adult eligibility should be completed
  • Apply for SSI (Supplemental Security Income) and Medicaid.
  • Visit adult providers programs
  • Attend job fairs if appropriate
  • Establish legal guardianship if necessary
  • Explore future planning
18-21 Years Old
  • Refine vision statement
  • Revise and update IEP goals
  • Invite transition coordinator your child’s IEP meeting
  • Explore and obtain necessary funding for adult programs
  • Ensure there is a plan for medical/health coverage
  • Confirm all support services are in place.

Below is a free transition printable planning checklist. Feel free to download the PDF.

transition-planning

transition-planning-checklist

11 Things I’ve Learned Since Being Diagnosed as Autistic

11 things I've learned since being diagnosed as autistic
Source: Metro

If you’re diagnosed with Autistic Spectrum Disorder, you’re already well aware that you see the world differently from those not on the spectrum.  

And because ASD is a ‘spectrum’ condition, everyone who has it is different. The clichéd (but still very true) saying is that ‘once you’ve met one person with autism…you’ve met ONE person with autism’.

With that in mind, any article about it can never be anything other than a very personal viewpoint, but I’m pretty sure anyone with ASD in any form will recognise a lot of the things I grumble about on this list.

Note – some people prefer ‘person with autism’, but I go with ‘autistic’ most of the time. My condition, my choice! Click here to read the rest of the story