November Special Needs Article Links

specialneedslinks

Welcome to the November links. These are articles that I tweeted and or received from viewers during the month of November on special needs and developmental disability topics. Enjoy!

5 simple but important ways to help include kids with autism

14-Year Old with Asperger’s syndrome makes debut as an author

Activism and Advocacy- The Road from here to now

Autism: Parents face challenges too

Autism is seen as a male thing- but girls just implode emotionally

Children with autism may be over-diagnosed with ADHD: Study

Concussions are more prevalent in teens with ADHD

Dealing with sensory overload during the holidays

Employers are letting down people with autism

Mother and daughter share their struggles with dyslexia

Not letting ADHD get in the way of managing a business

Supreme Court hears service dog case

Utah adolescents with autism get own ‘high school,’ prevocational education

Woman with Down syndrome becomes the first teacher in Latin America

Advertisements

What To Do When Someone Has A Seizure

shutterstock_epilespy

Over a lifetime, 1 in 26 people will be diagnosed with epilepsy. More than 30% of people with epilepsy will experience generalized seizures. When providing first aid for seizures, try to keep calm and make sure the person having the seizure is comfortable and safe from harm.

Call 911 if:

  • The person has never had a seizure before.
  • the person has difficulty breathing or waking after the seizure.
  • The seizure lasts longer than 5 minutes.
  • The person has a seizure back- to- back.
  • The person is injured during the seizure.
  • The person has an additional condition like diabetes, or heart disease.
  • Ease the person to the floor.
  • Turn the person gently onto the side (this will help the person breathe).
  • Clear the area around the person of anything hard or sharp
  • Put something soft and flat, like a folded jacket, under his or her head.
  • Loosen ties or anything around the neck including button on a shirt.
  • Time the seizure.

Do Not:

  • Do not hold the person down or try to stop his or her movements.
  • Do not put anything in the person’s mouth. This can injure teeth or the jaw. A person having a seizure cannot swallow his or her tongue.
  • Do not try to give mouth-to-mouth breaths (CPR). People usually start breathing again on their own after a seizure.
  • Do not offer the person water or food until he or she is fully alert.

After the seizure:

After the seizure ends, the person will probably be groggy and tired. He or she also may have a headache and be confused or embarrassed. Try to help the person find a place to rest. If necessary, offer to call a taxi, a friend, or a relative to help the person get home safely.

Don’t try to stop the person from wandering unless he or she is in danger.

Don’t shake the person or shout.

Stay with the person until he or she is completely alert.

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Source: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

3 Ways Technology Can Help Students With Autism

Image result for technology
(Article Source: Ed Tech)

It is a statistic that most Americans would probably be stunned to find is so prevalent: One of out every 68 kids in the United States is on the autism spectrum, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. While it’s true that most children these days are considered “digital natives,” children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) also find themselves most comfortable with a device in their hands.

In an article for the Indiana Resource Center for Autism, author Kristie Brown Lofland notes that children with ASD are visual learners, which means technology can be a valuable tool in the learning process.

“Technology just makes visual images more accessible to the individual with ASD. Computer graphics capture and maintain their attention,” Lofland writes. Click here to read the rest of the story.

The invisible girls on the Autism Spectrum — Everyday Autism

I recently helped a friend with her niece, who had just been diagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder. My friend strongly felt that this diagnosis was wrong, and after reading more about my symptoms and experiences with ASD believed that her niece “Anne” (name changed) was actually Autistic. The symptoms were all there – social issues, […]

via The invisible girls on the Autism Spectrum — Everyday Autism

ADHD Coping Strategies You Haven’t Tried

A toolbox representing the best ADHD strategies

Source: ADD Attitude Magazine

Many adults and parents who live with ADHD use strategies that they’ve devised themselves, modified and refined. These tips don’t appear in articles about ADHD, but they work beautifully. What works for you may not work for someone else. Click here to read the rest of the article.

 

Benefits of being an Autism Mum — Upside Mum

Firstly, the title is for effect. I’m not a big fan of the term ‘Autism Mum’ and only use it when it’s the only succinct way to describe what I’m talking about. I don’t mind other people using it, I just try not to use it myself. I’m just a mum. I have a child […]

via Benefits of being an Autism Mum — Upside Mum

Apps For Tracking Seizures

Seizure apps are available on both iTunes and Android which journals seizure episodes. This allows people with epilepsy and parents to keep an accurate record of seizure occurrences.

Most apps include the following features.

  • Time and visually record seizures as they happen
  • Automatically add recorded seizures to the library
  • Help request are sent to your emergency contacts with your current locations
  • Information is organized into graphs to share with your medial provider

seizure-apps

All of the apps below are free, You will just need to download onto your phone.

iTunes

EpiDiary

Epilepsia App

Epilepsy Foundation- My Seizure Diary

Epilepsy Ireland Diary

Epilepsy Toolkit

EpiWatch

Neutun

SeizAlarm

Seizure Watch

Track It

Young Epilepsy

Android

Dr. Epilepsy

Epi Diary

Epilepsy App

Epilepsy Foundation

Epilepsy Help

Epilepsy Ireland Diary

Epilepsy Journal

Epilepsy Tool Kit

Epilepsy Tracker

My Seizure Diary

Seizure Alert and Recorder

Seizure Now

Soterria Seizure Alert

Android- Cost.

Seizure Now- .99

 

 

 

 

Parent-Led Intervention May Reduce Autism Severity

Deanna Ballard helps her son Zachary, who has autism, while his sister, Makenna, looks on. New research suggests that parent-led intervention can make a big difference for children with the developmental disorder. (Renee C. Byer/The Sacramento Bee/TNS)
Source: Disability Scoop

For the first time, researchers say they have evidence that parent-led intervention for young kids with autism continues to yield gains several years later.

Children who participated in an intervention between the ages of 2 and 4 displayed less severe symptoms six years later, exhibiting fewer repetitive behaviors and better social communication, according to findings published this week in the journal The Lancet. Click here to read the rest of the story.

# 3 This also can be called Disability discrimination — Don’t Dis their Ability

Hi everyone how is your day? For many of you, I know nobody want to admit he/she is discriminating people with disability, because some people did not realise that their behaviours can be called indirect discrimination; others who discriminate directly actually know it goes against and destroys the moral, which becomes a trend of weakness […]

via # 3 This also can be called Disability discrimination — Don’t Dis their Ability

Epilepsy Facts

Epilepsy is a disorder of the central nervous system often caused by abnormal electrical discharges that develop into seizures. The following are additional facts on epilepsy and seizures:

30-epilepsy-facts

  • More people live with epilepsy than autism, spectrum disorders, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis and cerebral palsy combined.
  • You can’t swallow your tongue during a seizure. It is physically impossible.
  • You should never force something into the mouth of someone having a seizure.
  • Don’t restrain someone having a seizure.
  • Epilepsy is not contagious .
  • Anyone can develop epilepsy.
  • Epilepsy is not rare.
  • 1 in 26 Americans will develop epilepsy in their lifetime.4An estimated 3 million Americans and 65 million people worldwide live with epilepsy.
  • In 2/3 of patients diagnosed with epilepsy, the cause is unknown.
  • Up to 50,000 deaths occur annually in the U.S. from status epilepticus (prolonged seizures). (SUDEP) and other seizure-related causes such as drowning and other accidents.
  • SUDEP accounts for 34% of all sudden deaths in children.
  • Epilepsy costs the U.S. approximately 15.5 billion each year.
  • A seizure is a transient disruption of brain function due to abnormal and excessive electrical discharges in brain cells.
  • Epilepsy is a disease of the brain that predisposes a person to excessive electrical discharges in the brain cell.
  • It is diagnosed when 2 or more unprovoked seizures have occurred.
  • It must be at least 2 unprovoked seizures more than 24 hours apart.
  • About 14% have simple partial seizures.
  • 36% have complex partial seizures.
  • 5% have tonic-clonic seizures.
  • Seizures can be caused by head trauma, stokes, brain tumor and a brain infection.
  • Causes are unknown in 60 to 70% of cases.
  • The prevalence is 1% of the U.S. population.
  • Approximately 2.2 to 3 million in the U.S. have seizures.
  • It affects all ages, socioeconomic and racial groups.
  • Incidents are higher in children and older adults.
  • Seizures can range from momentarily blanks to loss of awareness
  • Almost 150,000 people in the U.S. develop epilepsy every year.
  • No gender is likely to develop than others.
  • 1/3 of individuals with autism spectrum disorders also have epilepsy.
  • The prevalence of epilepsy in people with an intellectual disability is higher than the general population.