November Special Needs Article Links

specialneedslinks

Welcome to the November links. These are articles that I tweeted and or received from viewers during the month of November on special needs and developmental disability topics. Enjoy!

5 simple but important ways to help include kids with autism

14-Year Old with Asperger’s syndrome makes debut as an author

Activism and Advocacy- The Road from here to now

Autism: Parents face challenges too

Autism is seen as a male thing- but girls just implode emotionally

Children with autism may be over-diagnosed with ADHD: Study

Concussions are more prevalent in teens with ADHD

Dealing with sensory overload during the holidays

Employers are letting down people with autism

Mother and daughter share their struggles with dyslexia

Not letting ADHD get in the way of managing a business

Supreme Court hears service dog case

Utah adolescents with autism get own ‘high school,’ prevocational education

Woman with Down syndrome becomes the first teacher in Latin America

3 Ways Technology Can Help Students With Autism

Image result for technology
(Article Source: Ed Tech)

It is a statistic that most Americans would probably be stunned to find is so prevalent: One of out every 68 kids in the United States is on the autism spectrum, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. While it’s true that most children these days are considered “digital natives,” children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) also find themselves most comfortable with a device in their hands.

In an article for the Indiana Resource Center for Autism, author Kristie Brown Lofland notes that children with ASD are visual learners, which means technology can be a valuable tool in the learning process.

“Technology just makes visual images more accessible to the individual with ASD. Computer graphics capture and maintain their attention,” Lofland writes. Click here to read the rest of the story.

The invisible girls on the Autism Spectrum — Everyday Autism

I recently helped a friend with her niece, who had just been diagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder. My friend strongly felt that this diagnosis was wrong, and after reading more about my symptoms and experiences with ASD believed that her niece “Anne” (name changed) was actually Autistic. The symptoms were all there – social issues, […]

via The invisible girls on the Autism Spectrum — Everyday Autism

ADHD Coping Strategies You Haven’t Tried

A toolbox representing the best ADHD strategies

Source: ADD Attitude Magazine

Many adults and parents who live with ADHD use strategies that they’ve devised themselves, modified and refined. These tips don’t appear in articles about ADHD, but they work beautifully. What works for you may not work for someone else. Click here to read the rest of the article.

 

Benefits of being an Autism Mum — Upside Mum

Firstly, the title is for effect. I’m not a big fan of the term ‘Autism Mum’ and only use it when it’s the only succinct way to describe what I’m talking about. I don’t mind other people using it, I just try not to use it myself. I’m just a mum. I have a child […]

via Benefits of being an Autism Mum — Upside Mum

Apps For Tracking Seizures

Seizure apps are available on both iTunes and Android which journals seizure episodes. This allows people with epilepsy and parents to keep an accurate record of seizure occurrences.

Most apps include the following features.

  • Time and visually record seizures as they happen
  • Automatically add recorded seizures to the library
  • Help request are sent to your emergency contacts with your current locations
  • Information is organized into graphs to share with your medial provider

seizure-apps

All of the apps below are free, You will just need to download onto your phone.

iTunes

EpiDiary

Epilepsia App

Epilepsy Foundation- My Seizure Diary

Epilepsy Ireland Diary

Epilepsy Toolkit

EpiWatch

Neutun

SeizAlarm

Seizure Watch

Track It

Young Epilepsy

Android

Dr. Epilepsy

Epi Diary

Epilepsy App

Epilepsy Foundation

Epilepsy Help

Epilepsy Ireland Diary

Epilepsy Journal

Epilepsy Tool Kit

Epilepsy Tracker

My Seizure Diary

Seizure Alert and Recorder

Seizure Now

Soterria Seizure Alert

Android- Cost.

Seizure Now- .99

 

 

 

 

Parent-Led Intervention May Reduce Autism Severity

Deanna Ballard helps her son Zachary, who has autism, while his sister, Makenna, looks on. New research suggests that parent-led intervention can make a big difference for children with the developmental disorder. (Renee C. Byer/The Sacramento Bee/TNS)
Source: Disability Scoop

For the first time, researchers say they have evidence that parent-led intervention for young kids with autism continues to yield gains several years later.

Children who participated in an intervention between the ages of 2 and 4 displayed less severe symptoms six years later, exhibiting fewer repetitive behaviors and better social communication, according to findings published this week in the journal The Lancet. Click here to read the rest of the story.

# 3 This also can be called Disability discrimination — Don’t Dis their Ability

Hi everyone how is your day? For many of you, I know nobody want to admit he/she is discriminating people with disability, because some people did not realise that their behaviours can be called indirect discrimination; others who discriminate directly actually know it goes against and destroys the moral, which becomes a trend of weakness […]

via # 3 This also can be called Disability discrimination — Don’t Dis their Ability

Lesson Plan: Sensory Activities for Children and Adults

Image result for orange

Orange is a color that is associated with the fall months of October and November. It can also be used as a training activity for people with developmental disabilities.

Click here to download a printed version

Facts about the color orange:

  • Orange is the color between red and yellow
  • It is associated with amusement, extroverts, warmth, fire ,energy, danger taste, aroma and autumn
  • It is the national color of Netherlands
  • It is the symbolic color of Buddhism and Hinduism.

Activity: What’s in the Box

Learning Objective: to identify various items using a multi-sensory approach

Activity Area:

  • Visual
  • Tactile
  • Olfactory
  • Kinesthetic

Materials needed:

  • shoe box
  • candy corn
  • carrot
  • orange
  • circus peanuts
  • crayon
  • cheeze-it
  • balloon
  • pumpkin
  • leaf

Instructions: Place all items into an empty container such as a shoe box. Once completed, have participants sit in a circle and pass around the box. Give each person an opportunity to touch the object and to guess the name of the object. For people with a severe cognitive level or multi-disabilities, provide hand over hand guidance.

Prompting:

Discuss with the group or class the various sizes, the aroma, etc.

Alternative Activity:

  1. You can also do a compare and contrast activity by adding items into the box of different colors and having the group choose the orange items.
  2. Have the group create a collage by cutting out items in a magazine that are orange. This will help with improving fine motor skills.

 

 

Girls With Autism May Mask Condition With Social Skills

Researchers are looking into a gender effect in autism diagnoses.
Source: The Associated Press/Mashable

Think autism and an image of an awkward boy typically emerges. The developmental disorder is at least four times more common in boys, but scientists taking a closer look are finding some gender-based surprises: Many girls with autism have social skills that can mask the condition. And some girls are born without autism despite the same genetic mutations seen in boys with the condition. Click here to read the rest of the story.