Epilepsy Driving and State Regulations

Driving can be challenging for people who have a seizure disorder. Accidents may occur due to a seizure disorder which puts the person at risk. In the United States, each State has specific guidelines and laws on the requirement for driving once the person is seizure-free.

Most people are able to drive again once their seizures are under control. In some States, a letter from the doctor is required. Below are regulations for each State:

State Regulations

Alabama- 6 Months with exceptions

Alaska- 6 Months

Arizona- 3 Months with exceptions

Arkansas- 1 year

California- 3, 6 moths with exception

Colorado- No set seizure- free period

Connecticut- Not set seizure- free period

Delaware- Not set seizure- free period

District of Columbia- 1 year

Florida- Upon Doctor’s recommendation

Georgia- 6 Months

Hawaii- 6 months with exception

Idaho- 6 months with strong recommendation from doctor

Illinois- No set seizure- free period

Iowa- 6 months less if seizure nocturnal

Kansas- 6 months less if seizure nocturnal

Kentucky- 90 days

Louisiana- 6 months with doctor statement

Maine- 3 months or longer

Maryland- No set seizure- free period

Massachusetts- 6 months- less with doctor statement

Michigan- 6 months- less at discretion of department

Minnesota- 6 months with exception

Mississippi- 1 year

Missouri- 6 months with doctor recommendation

Montana- No set seizure- free period, doctor recommendation

Nebraska- 3 months

Nevada- 3 months with exception

New Hampshire- 1 year/ less- discretion of the department

New Jersey- 1 year: less on recommendation of committee

New Mexico- 1 year, less on recommendation of advisory board

New York- 1 year with exception

North Carolina- 6-12, with exception

North Dakota- 6 months, restricted license possible after 3 months

Ohio- No set seizure free period

Oklahoma- 6 months

Oregon- 6 months with exception

Pennsylvania-  6 months with exception

Puerto Rico- No set seizure- free period

Rhode Island- 18 months. Less with doctor recommendation

South Carolina- 6 months

South Dakota- 6-12 months less with doctor recommendation

Tennessee- 6 months with acceptable medical form

Texas- 6 months with doctor recommendation

Utah- 3 months

Vermont- No set seizure – free period

Virginia – 6 months with exception

Washington- 6 months with exception

West Virginia- 1 year with exception

Wisconsin- 3 months, with acceptable medical form

Wyoming- 3 months

 

 

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August Special Needs Article Links

Welcome to the August article links. These are articles that I tweeted and or received from viewers during the month of August on special needs and developmental disability topics.

9 best toys for toddlers with autism (The Mom Kind)

10 best sports for kids with sensory processing disorders (Health Basics)

ADHD and Dyslexia (News Medical Life Science)

ADHD symptoms in children vs. adults (Medical Daily)

Autism and difficulty in gauging time (Autism Speaks)

Forget stereotypes… How to recruit talented, neurodiverse employees (The Guardian)

Getting your child on the spectrum ready for the school year (Livanis Behavioral Consulting)

How embracing my ADHD makes me a better entrepreneur (Entrepreneur)

How one Texas parent is trying to solve a growing problem in the adult autistic community (Dallas News)

How my husband and son are teaching strangers about autism (Autism Speaks)

Preparing an autism friendly primary classroom (ASC)

Program teaches people with autism how to swim (Autism Speaks)

Recognizing the signs of learning disabilities (Komo News)

Ten things I’ve learned in my ten years as an autism mom (Autism Speaks)

Top ways a gluten free diet can help kids with autism (Autism Parenting Magazine)

Ultimate guide to weighted blankets for kids and adults (Growing Hands on Kids)

Using public transportation when you have autism (I News)