Growing Up With Autism and ADHD, I Had To Adapt My Own Education


Published by: Ravishly

I had a dream about writing this. In my dream, I got an email from one of the Ravishly editors, someone who I’ve worked with before but who didn’t assign me this piece. The email popped up in my Gmail inbox, alerting me with a little bold (1) that I had to open and read it. The message was something to the effect of: “Hey Alaina! I see you didn’t turn in your piece to Jenni on time, which was due yesterday. We’re going to have to remove you from the schedule permanently, effective now.” Click here to read the rest of the story

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Helping Children Understand Person First Language


Pubished by: ASD
Written By: Nicole Dezarn

Person first language is an important ethical matter often discussed in the field of special education and disability advocacy. The idea that the important descriptor for a person is not their disability but that the disability is something that the person has is fundamental in framing the mindset that having a disability doesn’t mean that a person is less or incapable of success. It can be challenging enough to broach this subject with adults but how do we help children to understand what person first language means and why it is so important? I felt it might be helpful to share an approach with which I have had success. Click here to read the rest of the story

Ten Seconds That Prove You Should Never Undersestimate A Non-Vebral Child


Published by: Faithmummy Blog

Speech and language therapists have all but given up on him, encouraging me to just accept he is non-verbal with limited understanding.
School take him on ‘environmental excursions’ rather than reading and writing because…well he can’t hold a pencil despite having been in school for four and a half years so he is never going to read and write is he?
The learning difficulties mental health team wrote to us explaining his challenging behaviour and long spells of screaming are just part of his complex diagnosis and are unlikely to change. Click here to read the rest of the story

Disability Integration Act

 

The Disability Integration Act (DIA) of 2017 is a bill introduced by Charles “Chuck” Schumer (D-NY) in the health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee. The purpose of the bill is to prohibit states or local government that provide institutional placements for people with disabilities who require long term assistance prohibits insurance services from denying community-based services which would allow people to live independently in the community.

Community-based services must be offered to individuals prior to placement in institutions. People that are living in institutions must be notified regularly of community-based alternatives.

This bill was introduced May 16, 2017.

Study of Nonverbal Autism Must Go Beyond Words, Says Expert


Source: Spectrum
Author: Sarah Deweedt

Roughly 25 percent of people with autism speak few or no words. A generation ago, that figure was closer to 50 percent. Most researchers agree that the decline is due to the recognition of more people with milder forms of autism, as well as to the advent of early intervention programs  that have helped more children. Click here for the rest of the story.

12 Tips for Teaching Tactile Skills to Struggling Braille Readers

Collage of 12 tips for teaching tactile skills to struggling braille readers
Source: Paths to Literacy

Struggling braille readers may easily become frustrated or discouraged, so it’s critical to find ways to ensure success whenever possible.  Here are some strategies to promote tactile skills with struggling braille readers:

  1. Implement a variety of tactile activities throughout the daily schedule. Students need practice not just reading braille, but also using tactile information.
    • Put an article in a bag and have the student remove it and describe it – NOT tell you what it is. Ask them to think about questions, such as how much does it weigh, how long, what shape, what else might be like this, what is the purpose of the item, how is it different from yesterday’s item, etc. This is a good starter for lessons, introducing seasons of the year, special events, common knowledge, etc.
    • I recall putting a boat in the bag when the movie Titanic was showing.
    • Another example would be a stapler, and then to teach students how to use it. By third grade kids need to use one daily to help their teacher pair braille and print pages.
    • A pen and pencil can help to teach likenesses and differences.
    • Every fruit imaginable showed up in the bag and then we had tasting parties one year.
    • Toys like a yo-yo, or other toys of the day can be put in the bag.
    • Students must answer in complete sentences (no one word answers). In fact students should be taught to respond to all questions in complete sentences.
    • All this ties into improving sentence structure, writing, common knowledge, and even social skills.

Click here to read the rest of the story