What Does OCD Look Like In The Classroom?

 


Published by: Child Mind Institute
Written by: Dr. Jerry Bubrick

For children who have obsessive-compulsive disorder, functioning in school can be complicated and very difficult. And for a teacher, it can be easy to misread the symptoms of OCD as oppositional behavior on the child’s part, or as ADHD.

But if teachers can recognize the behaviors associated with OCD, especially when a child is embarrassed and trying to hide his anxiety, they can help save him to receive treatment or make adjustments to from unnecessary struggle, and clear the way for him to learn successfully. Click here to read the rest of the story.

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Children With Autism and Breaks In Routine

Published by: Kid Companion
Written by: Lorna dEntremont

A child with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) may have greater difficulty in accepting changes of routine. This may be due to their greater need for predictability or difficulty when a pattern of routine is disrupted. Vacations, family visits, or field trips can be over-stimulating and distressing for the child with autism. If this is the case with your child, prepare BEFORE a scheduled change in routine occurs like before school breaks and for summer vacation. Click here for the rest of the story

Setting Students With ADHD Up for Success

Published by: Eutopia
Written by: Nina Parrish

Teachers often come to the classroom with an unclear understanding of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and they are rarely provided with strategies that detail how to work with students who have been diagnosed with ADHD, even though such students make up an increasingly large number of their students—11 percent and growing as of 2011, according to data gathered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

As a special education teacher and tutor who coaches struggling students (many with ADHD), I have found several classroom strategies to be effective. Click here for the rest of the story