What is Stimming?

Published by: Medical News Today

Written by: Lori Smith

Repetitive body movements or repetitive movement of objects is referred to as self-stimulatory behavior, abbreviated to stimming. Stimming can occur in people with autism and other developmental disabilities.

Some people will stim when nervous, employing behaviors such as pacing, biting their nails, hair twirling, or tapping their feet or fingers.

In this article, we will examine why stimming occurs and the different types that occur. We will also look at what can be done if someone’s stimming behaviors are causing them problems in day-to-day life. Click here to read the rest of the story

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27 Things to Know About Fragile X Syndrome

 

  1. It is a genetic condition
  2. Males are more affected than females
  3. Seizures occur in about 15% of males and 5% of females
  4. 1/3 individuals have similar characteristics of autism
  5. Features may include long and narrow face. large ears prominent jaw and flat feet
  6. Fragile X occurs in approximately 1 in 4,000 males and 1 in 8,000 females
  7. Symptoms oftn often include mild to moderate intellectual disability
  8. Child with Fragile X tend to have short attention span
  9. Self-talk is common using different tones and pitches
  10. In 1969, Herbert Lubs first discovered an unusual markers X chromosome in association with an intellectual disability.
  11. In 1970, Frederick Hecht coined the term Fragile site
  12. In 1985 Felix F. De La Cruz outlined physical. psychological, characteristics of those
  13. It is inherited
  14. Early signs may include developmental delays such as late developmental in sitting, walking, etc.
  15. In 1943, James, Purdon Martin and Julia Bell described a pedigree of the x-linked mental disability
  16. Fragile X is caused by a mutation in a single gene.
  17. Fragile X is also called Martin-Bell Syndrome
  18. Fragile X Syndrome has been found in all major ethnic groups and races
  19. Fragile x is the most common form of inherited developmental disability
  20. Fragile X is often mis-diagnosed
  21. It is formally named Martin-Bell
  22. It was first discovered  in 1943
  23. It is found in all races and socio-economic levels
  24. It varies from borderline to severe
  25. Diagnosis of Fragile X is due through DNA test and genetic counseling
  26. Fragile X changes can occur from one generation to the next
  27. Fragile X is inherited through the mother

 

What Does OCD Look Like In The Classroom?

 


Published by: Child Mind Institute
Written by: Dr. Jerry Bubrick

For children who have obsessive-compulsive disorder, functioning in school can be complicated and very difficult. And for a teacher, it can be easy to misread the symptoms of OCD as oppositional behavior on the child’s part, or as ADHD.

But if teachers can recognize the behaviors associated with OCD, especially when a child is embarrassed and trying to hide his anxiety, they can help save him to receive treatment or make adjustments to from unnecessary struggle, and clear the way for him to learn successfully. Click here to read the rest of the story.

Children With Autism and Breaks In Routine

Published by: Kid Companion
Written by: Lorna dEntremont

A child with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) may have greater difficulty in accepting changes of routine. This may be due to their greater need for predictability or difficulty when a pattern of routine is disrupted. Vacations, family visits, or field trips can be over-stimulating and distressing for the child with autism. If this is the case with your child, prepare BEFORE a scheduled change in routine occurs like before school breaks and for summer vacation. Click here for the rest of the story

Setting Students With ADHD Up for Success

Published by: Eutopia
Written by: Nina Parrish

Teachers often come to the classroom with an unclear understanding of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and they are rarely provided with strategies that detail how to work with students who have been diagnosed with ADHD, even though such students make up an increasingly large number of their students—11 percent and growing as of 2011, according to data gathered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

As a special education teacher and tutor who coaches struggling students (many with ADHD), I have found several classroom strategies to be effective. Click here for the rest of the story