8 Proven Stategies To Attract And Retain Job Candidates On The Autism Spectrum

Published by: ERE Recruiting Intelligence
Written by: Samatha Craft

Here are several strategies for attracting and retaining autistic job candidates, based on my experience working as a job recruiter and community manager for a U.S. technology company that provides employment for individuals on the autism spectrum.

Understand autism from different perspectives

Take time to read up on autism, including cultural and historical context by respected journalist. Examples of two well-received books are: NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity and In a Different Key: The Story of Autism. Consider professional accounts from well-known experts in the autism field, such as psychologist Tony Attwood and job coach Barbara Bissonnette. Click here to read the rest of the story.

Advertisements

About High Sensitivity, Autism & Neurodivesity

Published by: The Highly Sensitive Person
By: Elaine

To be very clear, the brain research continues to find high sensitivity and autism quite different, but they also have something in common. High sensitivity and autism spectrum are terms that describe differences—differences in brains that make them not typical. The neurodiversity “movement” wonders why the majority of brain differences (not due to injury or infection) can’t be seen as simply variations in human experiences rather than some of them being disorders? A disorder means someone is impaired or suffering, and we have made it very clear that people are not impaired or suffering simply because of having a highly sensitive brain. Likewise, many of those on the autism spectrum (or diagnosed with ADHD) also feel they are wrongly viewed as having a disorder when in fact their particular trait (brain difference), even if unusual, can make important contributions to the world. They do not feel impaired or that they are suffering. They feel they are just different. Read the rest of the story here

Helping Your Autistic Child Work Through Their fear of Storms

Published by: Emaxhealth

Written By: Brooke Price

We all know that when summer approaches so do those summer storms. You know the ones with lightening, thunder and black outs. Many of us parents of Autistic and special needs children find that our children are especially scared of storms. Their fears overtake them and sometimes it becomes too much and they meltdown. Nothing is worse than a meltdown, at night, when you have candles lit, it is storming, and you have no power. Here are some great pointers for how to calm your child during the storm seasons, or really to help you work your Autistic child through any fear. Click here to read the rest of the story

10 Things ADHD Is– and 3 It isn’t

Published by: Self Magazine

Written by: Christiana Stiehl

Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, or ADHD, is one of those mental health conditions that has become cultural shorthand in a pretty inappropriate way. Ignoring the fact that “I’m so ADHD” isn’t even grammatically correct, throwing this acronym around to flippantly explain distraction or disinterest waters down the true meaning of this extremely nuanced disorder. Not only that, it can further isolate those who do have ADHD, since they’re often already misunderstood. To dispel some of the common myths surrounding ADHD, we’ve broken down what the disorder actually is—and a couple things it isn’t, too. Click here to read the rest of the story