15 Resources on Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS)

Developed in 1985 by Andy Bondy, PHD and Lori Frost, MS, Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) allows individuals with little or no communication the ability to do so using pictures. The approach includes a person giving them a picture in exchange of an item. PECS teaches functional communication and includes 6 phases.

  1. How to communicate. In the first phase, the individual learns to exchange a single picture for an item or activity they want.
  2. Distance and persistence. The individual learns to generalize by using the picture with different people.
  3. Picture discrimination. The individual learns to select from two or more pictures to ask for something.
  4. Sentence structure. Individuals learn to construct simple sentences on a detachable sentence strip
  5. Responsive requesting. Individuals use PECS to answer wh questions.
  6. Commenting. individuals are taught to comment in response to questions.

The following links below include articles and additional information on the PECS system.

Articles on PECS

What is PECS?

Communication Matters

Kid Sense

National Autism Resources

National Professional Development Center on Autism Spectrum Disorders

Free Printable PECS Cards

28 emotions: Picture communication cards

Autism Tool Kit- Free Printable PECS Cards

Blank faces: Picture communication cards

Female faces: Picture communication cards

Free Primary PECS

Daily visual schedule for kids

Male body parts with words- picture cards

Months of the year: Picture communication cards

Morning routine pictures

Printable for autistic children and their families or caregivers

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2 thoughts on “15 Resources on Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS)

  1. With the prevalence of electronic communication devices, I have seen the use of PECS start to decline. The PECS training approach teaches the value of communicating with others in a way that is difficult to do with an electronic AAC device. I continue to use the PECS training protocol through at least phase 4 before recommending that families pursue an electronic device. Alternative communication is so important for individuals who don’t have the ability to communicate vocally.
    Thanks for sharing!

    Like

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