What is Executive Function Disorder?

What is Executive Functioning?

According to CHADD org, Executive function skills refers to brain functions that activate, organize, integrate and manage other functions which enables individuals to account for short- and long term consequences of their actions and to plan for those results.

According to Rebecca Branstetter, author of The Everything Parent’s Guide to Children with Executive Functioning Disorder, These skills are controlled by the area of the brain called the frontal lobe and include the following:

  • Task Initiation- stopping what you are doing and starting a new task
  • Response Inhibition- keeping yourself from acting impulsively in order to achieve a goal
  • Focus- directing your attention, keeping you focus, and managing distractions while you are working on a task
  • Time Management- understanding and feeling the passage of time, planning  good use of your time, and avoiding procrastination behavior.
  • Working Memory- holding information in your mind long enough to do something with it (remember it, process it, act on it)
  • Flexibility- being able to shift your ideas in changing conditions
  • Self-Regulations- be able to reflect on your actions and behaviors and make needed changes to reach a goal
  • Emotional Self-Control- managing your emotions and reflecting on your feelings in order to keep yourself from engaging in impulsive behaviors.
  • Task Completion- sustaining your levels of attention and energy to see a task to the end.
  • Organization- keeping track and taking care of your belongings (personal, school work) and maintaining order in your personal space.
What Causes Executive Functioning Disorder?
  • a diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)
  • a diagnosis of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)
  • a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder
  • depression
  • anxiety
  • Tourette syndrome
  • Traumatic
Signs and Symptoms
  • Short-term memory such ask being asked to complete a task and forgetting almost immediately.
  • Impulsive
  • Difficulty processing new information
  • Difficulty solving problems
  • Difficulty in listening or paying attention
  • issues in starting, organizing, planning or completing task
  • Difficulty in multi-tasking

Issues with executive functioning often leads to a low self-esteem, moodiness, insecurities, avoiding difficult task. and low motivation

Managing Executive Functions Issues
  • Create visual aids
  • use apps for time management and productivity
  • Request written instructions
  • Create schedule and review at least twice a day
  • Create checklist

 

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