Accommodations for Students with Dysgraphia

Dysgraphia is describes as a learning disability that affects writing, spelling and fine motor skills. Dysgraphia is a neurodevelopmental disorder that can occur as a stand alone disorder or part of a co-occurring disorder with other disabilities such as ADHD, Autism, and Dyslexia. Typically it is diagnosed or discovered in the early years when children are beginning to learn how to write. Most adults often remain undiagnosed.

Early Signs of Dysgraphia

Signs and symptoms of dysgraphia generally begin to show up when children began to lean how to write. Early signs of Dysgraphia include:

  • Inconsistent spacing between letters
  • Poor spatial planning
  • Poor spelling
  • Unable to read own handwriting
  • Poor fine motor skills
  • Omitted words
  • Writes slow
  • Pain in hand from writing
  • Messy unorganized papers
  • Difficulty organizing thoughts on paper
  • Illegible printing and cursive letter formation
  • Slopping handwriting
  • Tight, cramped pencil grip
  • Tires quickly when writing
  • mixes upper and lower case or irregular sizes and shapes of letters.

The following articles provide resources on accommodations:

6 tips for creating a dysgraphia-friendly classroom

A guide to classroom and at-home accommodations for dysgraphia

Classroom accommodations for students with dysgraphia

Dysgraphia Accommodations

Dysgraphia accommodations and modifications

Dysgraphia accommodations in the classroom

Dysgraphia accommodations that improve learning

Dysgraphia symptoms, accommodations, and IEP goals

How to assist a student with dysgraphia in the classroom

Possible accommodations to consider for children with dysgraphia

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