What to Know About Dyslexia and ADHD

Published by: Psych Central
Written by: Gia Miller

They have some shared symptoms, but dyslexia and ADHD are separate conditions. Here’s how to to tell them apart and tips for managing these conditions.

Dyslexia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are two neurological conditions that can make learning more difficult.

The former affects 11%, and the latter affects between 5 to 20%, but it’s difficult to estimate precisely.

Sometimes, the symptoms of ADHD and dyslexia can be hard to tell apart — as both can cause trouble with reading and writing. But even though the symptoms can appear similar, the underlying reasons for the symptoms are very different.

What is dyslexia?

Dyslexia is a condition that impacts your ability to use language. You may have trouble matching letters to sounds or recognizing the sounds in words. This can make it hard to read and understand what you’re reading.

Dyslexia can also make spelling, writing, or math more difficult. Click here to read the story

When Rett Symptoms Change

Published by: Rett Syndrome News
Written by: Jackie Babiarz

My 12-year-old daughter, Cammy, has Rett syndrome. Some days, Rett syndrome has Cammy.

During the early-onset stage, which typically occurs between 6 and 18 months of age, children may experience abnormal hand movements, difficulty sitting independently, and speech or language problems. Cammy was no different.

Repetitive hand movement is a hallmark sign of Rett, and Cammy had been hand mouthing from 12 months on. Her left hand was constantly in her mouth, causing sores. Other kids with Rett may wring their hands or pull out their hair. At 18 months, it was this behavior that tipped off Cammy’s physiatrist to the fact that she had Rett syndrome. Shortly after Cammy was diagnosed, her sister, Ryan, was born. Their two-year age gap began closing within a couple months when Ryan showed evidence of already being stronger than Cammy. Click here to read the rest of the story.

5 common learning disabilities

Published by: Washington Times Herald
Written by: Metro Creative Connection

Students are often told that hard work is the path to success. Individuals who have learning disabilities may have to work even harder than their peers to be successful.

The Learning Disabilities Association of America says learning disabilities occur due to neurobiological and/or genetic factors that alter the way the brain functions. This can affect one or more cognitive processes related to learning and interfere with various skills, potentially preventing a person from acquiring the same amount of knowledge as others of the same age.

There are many learning disabilities, and the following are five of the most common, according to LD Resources Foundation, Inc., a nonprofit organization that helps find solutions to those who are affected by learning disabilities.

1. Dyslexia: This learning disability can impede a person’s ability to read and comprehend text. Students may have trouble with phonemic awareness, or the way to break down words. Similar problems with phonological processing, or distinguishing between similar word sounds, can occur as well.

2. ADHD: Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder is marked by behaviors that make it difficult to pay attention and stay on task. The Masters in Special Education, a resource for finding work and study in special education concentrations, says there is debate over whether ADHD is a learning disability. But there is no denying that ADHD can impede success in school settings.

Click here to read the rest of the story

ADHD Time Blindness Contributes to My Impulse Spending

Published by: Health.com
Written by: Mikhal Weiner

For me, the worst part of ADHD isn’t being fidgety or hyper-focused; it’s under-discussed symptoms such as time blindness and impulsive spending—which have made my finances a constant struggle.

ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) is often associated solely with the obvious symptoms—such as fidgeting, cutting up in class, and general disorganization. While this is an accurate description of certain aspects of ADHD, there are far more (often overlooked) symptoms of this disorder—that wildly affect the lives of those, like me, with ADHD.

For me, those underreported symptoms include time blindness as well as impulsive spending—symptoms that have made managing my finances a constant struggle. Even though I usually manage to keep away from overspending, I can only achieve this by keeping myself on a very short (at times, painful) leash. Click here to read the rest of the story.