Teaching Self-Confidence to Children with ADHD

Dr. William Dodson, expert on ADHD issues states that it is estimated that those with ADHD receive 20,000 more negative messages by age 12 than those without the condition. This may be due to the characteristics of ADHD including:

  • Unable to give close attention to detail or makes careless mistakes
  • Struggles to follow-through on instructions
  • Avoids or dislikes task requiring sustained mental effort
  • Losing things necessary for task or activities
  • unorganized and messy.

Children, teens and adults with ADHD more than likely grew up hearing, “you’re lazy and can’t do anything right.” Low self-esteem develops from constant negative feedback believing they are not smart or good enough.

The following articles provide tips, resources and information on ways to build self-confidence in kids with ADHD:

4 small ways to build confidence in kids

5 ways to boost your ADHD child’s confidence 

10 strategies for helping kids with ADHD build self confidence

Build self-esteem in your child with ADHD

Childhood ADHD and poor self-esteem

Don’t let ADHD crush children’s self-esteem

How to boost your ADHD child’s self-esteem

How to vanquish a child’s low self-esteem

How to Improve Self Esteem In Kids with ADHD

The importance of self-esteem for kids with learning and attention issues

 

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Data Collection for Special Education Teachers

Writing IEP goals and objectives includes collecting data to track the progress of the special needs student. The following links and resources includes information on measuring progression, organizing data and tracking IEP goals

16 hacks for making data collection a piece of cake

Data collection for IEP’s: Measuring progression toward a goal

Data collection for individualized education plan implementation

Data collection for special education teachers

How to organize special education data for easy review

IEP and goals data collection 

IEP data collection

IEP data collection methods

Tips for setting and tracking IEP goals

Using Google docs to collect data for IEP goals

People With Autism have Plenty To Offer Companies, With The Right Support

Published By: Delaware
Written By Dennis Assanis and James Mahoney

Innovation drives the future, and neurodiversity can help drive innovation.

In pursuit of the next great technology, product or enterprise, organizations often lose sight of the fact that innovation starts with people. And the most inventive breakthroughs and outcomes don’t just emerge from anywhere; they evolve from communities of creative thinkers who typify diversity and inclusiveness.

Neurodiversity is the idea that people with autism and other neurological differences are a natural part of the typical range of human mental ability and that, as such, they may need guidance, accommodations and individualized treatments — not cures or one-size-fits-all therapies — to navigate traditional society. As a result, a growing number of schools and workplaces are beginning to embrace this perspective, not only because it’s the right thing to do but because it can translate into a huge benefit for the entire organization on many levels. Click here to read the rest of the story

What is an ISP?

An Individual Support Plan (ISP) is an ongoing process of establishing goals for individuals and identifies supports and strategies that reflect the person’s strength and abilities and details all of the services and supports needed in order to keep the person in their community. The ISP should reflect an opportunity for the person to live in the least restrictive home setting and to have the opportunity to engage in activities and styles of living which encourage and maintain the integration of the individual in the community through individualized social and physical environments.

Who should be included in the development of the ISP?
  • The person receiving services
  • family members, caregiver, or designated representative
The ISP Planning Process

The ISP should be developed with participation from the following people:

  • The individual
  • Members of the individual’s family
  • A guardian, if any
  • The individual’s Service Coordinator
When is an ISP meeting held?

The meeting is held when it is desired or needed. Some State require meetings every 6 months while others every 2 years, so check with your state regulations.

What is discussed at ISP meetings?

The meeting should focus on 5 areas:

  • Review and gathering information including any new changes or discoveries. Has the person’s health status changed?
  • The person’s goals and desires
  • Review or identify personal value outcomes
  • Recent events that may affect the person’s health, safety and goals
  • Review and develop next-step strategies and resources
What must the ISP include?

The ISP should include:

  • Specific goals
  • The supports the individual needs to reach those goals without regard to the availability of those goals.
  • Who is responsible for providing those supports
  • How often and how much support is needed
  • The criteria foe evaluating the effectiveness of the supports
  • Team members responsibilities for monitoring the ISP implementation
  • The date of the next ISP review.

Bullying and Special Needs Children

A survey conducted found that half of parents surveyed have a special needs child who had been bullied during school hours.

Warning Signs of Bullying

  1. Unexplained injuries
  2. Lost or destroyed clothing, books, electronics or jewelry
  3. Feeling sick or faking illness
  4. Changes in eating habits
  5. Difficulty sleeping
  6. Declining grades
  7. Self-destructive behavior
  8. Feelings of helplessness

A bullying guide for parents. Developed by the National Autistic Society in the U.K., offers tips and resources for parents.

Council for Exceptional Children. Q&A with Dr. Chad A. Rose on the Interpretation and Information regarding the Department of Education’s Letter Addressing Bullying Among Students with Disabilities

National Bullying Prevention Resources. Offers parents and educators bullying prevention resources including educational toolkits, awareness toolkits, contest ideas and promotional products

stopbullying.gov– A federal government website managed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human services. Provides resources on State laws and policies, training information and school bullying prevention tips.

Wrightslaw. A webpage offering information on laws and disability harassment including the legal obligation of the school.

Articles

8 ways to help your child with autism stop bullying at school

Bullying: Children and teenagers with autism spectrum disorder

Bullying among children and youth with disabilities and special needs

Bullying and students on the autistic spectrum

Signs of bullying in special needs children

How can I protect my autistic child from bullying?

How to deal with bullied children with disabilities

Why autistic kids make easy targets for school bullies

Autism, Head Banging and Other Self-Harming Behavior

Published By: Autism Parenting magazine

For children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), head banging is a common way to self-soothe and communicate needs. Both neurotypical and autistic babies and toddlers seek to recreate the rhythm that stimulated their vestibular system while in utero. Other rhythmic habits that fuel a child’s kinesthetic drive include head rolling, body rocking, biting, and thumb sucking. According to Dr. Harvey Karp MD, rhythmic habits trigger the calming reflex in infants and toddlers. Many babies begin head banging around six months of age, but neurotypical children usually will not continue the behavior after the age of three. Please click here to read the rest of the story.

Adults with Special Needs and Housing Options

For many years, most people with developmental disability had only the option of living at home with family or become institutionalized. Today, people are given many more housing options. Although there is still a challenge in finding the right fit, home opportunities are more available. The following are housing options for adults with special needs.

Living with parents or family

Adults with special needs may choose to live at home with their families as long as they can. In some cases, adults with developmental disabilities continue to live at home after their parent’s death by hiring a Personal care Attendant (PCA). A PCA is hired by a person with a disability to assist with his or her personal care routine. People are eligible for this service is they qualify for Medicaid if they have a severe, chronic disability and requires physical assistance for personal care.

Section 811

The Section 811 program allows persons with disabilities to live as independently as possible in the community by subsidizing rental housing opportunities which provide access to appropriate supportive services. Serves extremely low-income individuals with serious and long-term disabilities, including physical or developmental disabilities as well as mental illness.

  • Is designed to accommodate the special needs of such persons;
  • Makes available supportive services that address the individual health, mental health and other needs of such persons; and
  • Promotes and facilitates community integration for people with significant and long-term disabilities.”

Group Homes

Residential home which provides 24-hour support services in a group setting. Oversight, training and supervision are provided by staff employed by a provider agency. This type of facility is provided to those with significant health and/or safety needs.

Individual Supports

Are limited to 3 or fewer individuals and provide need-based support and services for those living in their own homes or apartments, but do not require 24-hour staff support and supervision.

Assisted living communities,

  • also referred to as supported care facilities, provide care to older adults who are unable to live independently, often needing assistance with ADLs. Most offer private and semi-private apartment-style living often containing a living area and kitchenette.

 

Kids with developmental disabilities are more likely to be overweight, study says

Published By: Action News (6)

Local researchers have turned up an interesting connection between autism and obesity in children.

Teams at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, the University of Pennsylvania, and six others centers found that kids with developmental delays, including autism, were up to 50 percent more likely to be overweight or obese.

And the more severe the symptoms, the greater the chance of being obese.

Doctors don’t know yet why these kids become overweight. It could be due to endocrine disorders, side effects from medication, picky eating, or other factors. Click here to read the rest of the story.

6 Surprising Ways To Ditch Disability Bias In The Workplace

Published By: Forbes Magazine
Written By: Denise Brodey

People with disabilities, now the largest minority group in this country, are largely misunderstood by business leaders, managers, and well, a lot of people. And at the same time, C-suite executives are actively looking for ways to remove disability bias and lessen the employment gap. But disability advocates say the research and statistics on people’s understanding of the disability community are still dismal. How do we meet in the middle? How do we have the tough conversations that will inspire both sides?
How can we all go the extra mile? Click here to read the rest of the story

15 Resources on Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS)

Developed in 1985 by Andy Bondy, PHD and Lori Frost, MS, Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) allows individuals with little or no communication the ability to do so using pictures. The approach includes a person giving them a picture in exchange of an item. PECS teaches functional communication and includes 6 phases.

  1. How to communicate. In the first phase, the individual learns to exchange a single picture for an item or activity they want.
  2. Distance and persistence. The individual learns to generalize by using the picture with different people.
  3. Picture discrimination. The individual learns to select from two or more pictures to ask for something.
  4. Sentence structure. Individuals learn to construct simple sentences on a detachable sentence strip
  5. Responsive requesting. Individuals use PECS to answer wh questions.
  6. Commenting. individuals are taught to comment in response to questions.

The following links below include articles and additional information on the PECS system.

Articles on PECS

What is PECS?

Communication Matters

Kid Sense

National Autism Resources

National Professional Development Center on Autism Spectrum Disorders

Free Printable PECS Cards

28 emotions: Picture communication cards

Autism Tool Kit- Free Printable PECS Cards

Blank faces: Picture communication cards

Female faces: Picture communication cards

Free Primary PECS

Daily visual schedule for kids

Male body parts with words- picture cards

Months of the year: Picture communication cards

Morning routine pictures

Printable for autistic children and their families or caregivers