4 Tips On Task Initiation For Children and Adults

Task Initiation is often a challenge for children and adults with an executive functioning disorder. For a child, it may be lack of initiative in doing homework while for an adult, it may include forgetting or putting off paying bills. Children and adults with task initiation issues generally have a diagnosis of autism, ADHD, Intellectual disability or a learning disorder.

Signs of a task initiation impaired executive functioning skill would be someone having difficulty in getting started on a task and keeping the effort needed in order to complete the task. A child or an adult require external cues in order to complete the task. Also, it will require understanding what is expected and understanding the task. Here are a few strategies:

  1. Limit Distractions. In the classroom any type of added sensory input can defer the student from getting started in their school work.
  2. Create a List. Visual support will help to increase getting the work done for a school-age child, you may want to create a to-do list which the steps are broken down into smaller steps. When a person with an executive function is given a task, it may be overwhelming, making it more difficult to get started.
  3. Use Cues. A clock or a timer will help the child or adult stay on time and understanding the amount of time it will take to complete a task
  4. Break task down. Create where the work is done in chunks so that the work will not be as overwhelming for the student.

Strategies In Training Employees with ADHD

Have you ever conducted a training with employees where you experienced a participant interrupting you while you were talking, blurting out answers before you complete your sentence or appearing not to pay attention? Chances are you may have an employee diagnosed with ADHD.

Most people think of children when they hear the word ADHD, but the fact is that ADHD can continue into adulthood and as a life-long challenge. Currently, 4.4% of the U.s adult population is diagnosed with ADHD. Of these adults, 38% are women and 62% are men.

What is ADHD?

Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common neurodevelopmental disorders which is often characterized by a pattern of inattention/or hyperactivity/impulsivity that can impact workplace learning through making careless mistakes,the inability to complete a task, staying organized and excessive talking throughout the training.

Typically, a person with ADHD, the difficulties lies in the part of the brain that allows people to perform higher level task known as the executive function. 90% of people with ADHD also have an executive function disorder. This is the part of the brain that engages in goal-direction and self-regulations.

Two Types of ADHD:

Types of ADHD

Type 1: Inattention Without Hyperactivity

  • Trouble paying attention
  • Trouble following direction
  • Trouble following through with task
  • Easily distracted
  • Seems disorganized or careless
  • Slow to process information

Type 2: Hyperactivity Without Inattention

  • Trouble paying attention
  • Restlessness
  • Impulsive speech and action
  • Excessive talking
  • Difficulty waiting turns
  • May have a quick temper
  • Overactive
Challenges Training Employees with ADHD

Workplace learning in most cases for the participant means learning new information, participating in training activities, sitting for a period of time and given direction.

  • A participant with ADHD may have difficulty in sustaining attention and remaining focused during lectures.
  • May need questions repeated
  • May have difficulty in grasping main ideas or details during the lecture.
  • Become easily distracted by both internal (day dreaming) or external (noises) stimuli.
  • May blurt out an answer before a question has been completed.
  • May have difficulty in listening in environments with noise distractions.
  • Difficulty in following through with instructions
  • May talk excessively
  • Difficulty in taking turn in a conversation.

The upside is that often when a person with ADHD is interested in a topic, they may hyperfocus, meaning they will fully participant in group discussion, and show great enthusiasm for the subject matter.

Strategies that help in training employees with ADHD include:

Telling participants what they will learn

Vary instructions- auditory alone will not be effective, participants with ADHD will need visual aids as well.

Allow for frequent breaks.

Summarize key points of the training as a way to reinforce the lesson

Create a leadership role such as assisting in setting up any training equipment and giving out training material.

When possible, alternate between physical and mental activities.

Stick to the expectation of the time. It will be difficult for the participant to sustain focus once a time of dismissal is given.

Conduct a stretching activity for the group when possible, I would sometimes include a game of “would you rather.” This works great but should tie into the theme of the training.

Tips to remember:

A diagnosis of ADHD also qualifies under the American Disabilities Act regarding workplace accommodations.

 

 

 

16 Must-Read Training Resources In The U.K.

There are around 700,000 people on the autism spectrum in the U.K.- An estimated 1 in 100 people are affected. Studies also show that 60% of teachers in England do not feel they have adequate training to teach children with autism.

Thankfully across the U.K., a number of trainings that focus on autism help parents, professionals, caregivers and educators learn more about the autism spectrum disorder. below are links to trainings in the U.K.

England

Autism West Midlands
  • Autism West Midlands supports families and people with autism. Seminars and workshops are offered as well as an annual conference on autism.
Child Autism U.K.
  • Child Autism U.K. provides information and support for parents of children with autism. Training courses for parents includes beginner ABA and social skills.
The National Autistic Society- 
  • Leading U.K. charity for autistic children and their families. Provides information, support and services. NAS offers scheduled training events, in-house training and online training modules including training modules on communication, sensory experiences, stress and anxiety and physical activity.

Northern Ireland

Autism Initiatives
  • Provides a range of person-centered services throughout the U.K. Autism Initiatives Northern Ireland includes a learning and development department which is designed to meet the needs of all professional staff. Upcoming training topics for July includes, Understanding Autism, Epilepsy Awareness, and Keeping Children Safe. E-Learning courses are also available.
Autism NI
  • Northern Ireland’s longest-serving autism charity and training provider. Autism NI  provides family support workshops and discussion group. Training topics include, Fundamentals of Autism, Understanding Social Skills, Sensory Processing, and PECS training courses are held off-site.
Centre For Autism
  • Provides a wide range of training for professionals working with autistic children to parents, educators and caregivers. The organization also publishes a research bulletin designed to meet the needs of professionals working in education with autistic children. Trainings for parents include topics on, transition, sensory processing and life skills
PEAT
  • PEAT provides a wide range of training services for parents of children with autism and professionals involved with individuals with autism. PEAT provides in-house training and tailors made programs to meet the needs of parent groups and specific organizations.
The National Autistic Society, Northern Ireland
  • Provides information, support and training for autistic people, families, and professionals. Offers a variety of scheduled events, courses and online training modules.

Scotland

Autism Forth Valley
  • The Autism Forth Valley Website includes a table which contains information on training providers and courses including university courses on autism, professional organizations and social service agencies.
NHS Education for Scotland
  • NES offers a wide range of education and training support for both clinical and non-clinical staff in Scotland. Formats include e-learning, workbooks, publications and blended learning.
Scottish Autism
  • Provides a wide range of support services across Scotland for individuals with autism, their families and professionals. Scottish Autism offers external training core courses including, Introduction to Autism and Autism Profiling.

Wales

ASDinfoWales
  • An E-learning introductory course on autism spectrum disorder. Participants will be asked to answer a series of 20 questions. Once completed, participants will receive a certification.
Awares
  • Provides a library with a wealth of information on autism topics from previous conferences in Microsoft PowerPoint format. Geared towards professionals however this are also useful information for parents as well. Sample topics include; psychosexual development in ASD, A guide for practioners and resources for families living in Wales.
Learning Disability Wales
  • Training program includes a range of person-centered and practical courses for people in the public, voluntary and private sectors as well as parents and caregivers. Courses include a fee at an onsite facility. Training topics include, An Introduction to Mindfulness and Making Information Easy to Read and Understand
Ringway Training

A training provider delivering online courses on autism for professionals working with children, young people and adults on a host of topics including, Autism Spectrum Condition Advance Level Training and Autism and ADHD

The National Autistic Society/Wales
  • Offers a host of free one-hour webinars for teachers, professionals and parents. The website includes two series of one hour webinars on various topics such as, promoting inclusion, preventing bullying, and neurodevelopment and social competence in autism spectrum disorder.

May Special Needs Articles

Welcome to the May article links. These are articles that I tweeted and or received from viewers during the month of May on special needs and developmental disability topics. Enjoy!

5 things I learned from being an autism dad (Fatherly)

7 toilet training tips that help nonverbal kids with autism (Autism Speaks)

8 ingenious innovations helping autistic children communicate (Mashable)

9 important things autism moms want people to know (Autism Magazine)

10 steps to include students with autism in general education classrooms (Think Inclusive)

After an autism diagnosis: 13 necessary next steps for parents (Thinking Person’s Guide to Autism)

An overlooked resource- people with disabilities (Think Inclusive)

Author tells own story of life with cerebral palsy (Madison Magazine)

Autism: The hidden talent that shows up in the workplace (Business Standard)

Gaming may help kids with ADHD (The Newspaper)

How to help children with autism make, and keep friends (Chicago Tribune)

Kids treated for ADHD can still struggle in school, especially girls (Reuters)

The joys and challenges of being a parent with autism (The Atlantic)

Using visual schedules to get a child with autism organized in 45 minutes (Autismag)

What sensory processing disorder says about autism (Spectrum)

Book Review: My Belly Has Two Buttons: A Tubie Story


Book Review: My Belly has Two Buttons: A Tubie Buttons

Author: Meikele Lee
Illustrator: Rebecca Robertson
Pages: 20

Did you know that according to the Feeding Tube Awareness Foundation, there are over 300 conditions that require children to receive a nutritional support through tube-feeding which is expected to continue to rise?  The decision to use a feeding tube can be frightening for parents, children and siblings alike. Meikele Lee, author, mom and pediatric feeding disorder advocate, wrote this book  through the eyes  of 2-year-old Nico who takes the reader through his own journey of using a G-tube describes the meaning of NPO (nothing by mouth) and his MIC-KEY. A MIC-KEY button is used to conceal the tube as well as decrease the risk of snagging and removing the G-Tube. Nico explains his day of using a feeding bag. I enjoyed reading this book. The book does a great job in describing the purpose of a  g-tube and would be an appropriate book for children new to using a feeding tube, family members including siblings, extended family member and teachers interested in expanding disability educational programs in the school.

Additional Information

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Free Asthma and Allergy Training Modules

Before Asthma and Allergy Awareness Month ends, I wanted to post links to free training modules on asthma and allergy. Below you will find a few that are all self-study which you can review on your own time. I included one for teachers and parents that focus on created a lesson plan for children which would be great for child with and without asthma and allergy issues.

Asthma and Nutrition Training Module– Developed by the University of Florida Pediatric Pulmonary Center, this course provides participants information on asthma and nutrition that may be used in assessing and counseling clients. This is a self-study module in a PowerPoint format with audio capture.

Asthma on Wheels Teacher Training Module– Created through the Mecklenburg County Health Department Asthma Education Program. This teacher training module provides a lesson plan to students with discussions of asthma and learning activities and list ways to educate students about asthma being a controllable condition in which students can live actively healthy lives.

Asthma Program- Indiana State Department of Health– Website includes information and resources for healthcare providers including a printable asthma medication poster and an asthma guideline implementation steps and tools.

Continuing Education for Healthcare Professionals– A free online course presented by Cross County University. This course focuses on information on assessment and monitoring, control of environmental factors, medicine management and patient education.

Food Allergy School Staff Training Module– A 30 minute module is designed to assist the school nurse in staff training and increase food allergy awareness for all staff including teachers, administration, aides, specialist and coaches.

AAIDD 2017 Conference

Image result for aaidd conference

The American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities will be holding its 141st annual meeting on June 26thru June 29th in Hartford, Connecticut. The theme for the conference is “Promoting Health and Wellness.”

Registration fees are the following:

Registration Type
        Early Bird    
 before or on June 1st 
          Regular
Beginning June 2nd 
 Member General Registration*  $355  $375
 Non Member General Registration  $505  $549
 Full Time Student Registration  $220 $235
 Retiree/Self-Advocate/Family Member $220 $235
 Member One-Day Registration  $230  $245
 Non Member One-Day Registration  $260  $280
 Pre and Post Conference Sessions** $45  $45

*The general registration fee entitles you to attend all AAIDD Annual Meeting sessions and events held on Tuesday, 6/27 and Wednesday, 6/28.
** Pre and Post conference sessions are 3 hours sessions held on Monday, 6/26 and Thursday, 6/29 and are optional.

AAIDD Corporate Members- If your organization is a Corporate member, you’ll get 20% discount on registration fees for employees at AAIDD annual meetings.


Sibling Leadership Network Conference

AAIDD is pleased to host the national meeting of our partner organization on June 24-25, 2017 in Hartford.  You’ll be able to register for this meeting through the AAIDD registration link as well.

         Registration Fee $125      

For program information about this conference, please visit: http://siblingleadership.org/2017-sln-conference/

Click here for additional information

Talking About Autism, Listen To Families


Source: The Spectrum News
Author: Shannon Des Roches Rosa

I take a deep breath before reading any article, popular or scientific, about autism. I steel myself because most of these stories paint people like my curly-haired, autistic teenage son as burdens to their families — as changelings or enigmas. I love my son Leo fiercely and consider him none of those things, so these stories hurt. My adult autistic friends are even more pained than I am by these puzzlingly negative portrayals. Click here to read the rest of the story

April Special Needs Article Links

Welcome to the April article links. These are articles that I tweeted and or received from viewers during the month of April on special needs and developmental disability topics. Enjoy!

5 practical ways to help adults with autism gain employment (Autism Parenting Magazine)

10 things I wish the entertainment industry understood about autism (The Mighty)

20 tips on employment for students with disabilities (The Inclusion Lab)

Autism and parent fatigue (Autism Awareness Centre, Inc.)

Grandparents may be first to spot autism in a child (NHS)

How animals can help autistic children  (The Conversation)

Making art galleries autism friendly (A.N)

Moms work to empower children and adults with autism (ABC News)

New guideline tackles sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (Neurology Advisor)

Robots helping to teach students with autism in West Vancouver– (Global News)

Stop telling me I don’t look autistic (Metro)

Teaching Important life skills to kids with autism (Nurse Barb’s Daily Dose)

The innovating creative superpower of ADHD (Yes Magazine)

What teachers should know about ADHD and ASD (Edutopia)

When a child with autism gets lost (HuffPost)

Maternal Anxiety and Depression May Affect the Quality of Life of Children with Cerebral Palsy

Mother’s Anxiety or Depression Affects Her Child’s Quality of Life, Study Suggests
Source: Cerebral Palsy News Today

A new study suggests that maternal anxiety and depression may affect the quality of life of children with cerebral palsy (CP).

The study, “Impact of Symptoms of Maternal Anxiety and Depression on Quality of Life of children with Cerebral Palsy,” was recently published in the journal Archives of Neuropsychiatry.

CP is a leading cause of physical disability.  A heterogenous condition, it causes motor and sensory impairment, negatively affecting quality of life (QOL). However, that QOL in CP patients is multidimensional, and can be affected by other variables, including the person’s specific type of CP, cognitive function, and other medical disorders. Click here to read the rest of the story.