Technology Has Opened Doors For Those With Disabilities

Technology Has Opened Doors for Those with Disabilities
Written by: Jessica Grono
Published By: Cerebral Palsy News Today

No matter what type of cerebral palsy a person has, it limits their independence to a certain extent. Independence is amazing, especially when you have such a limited range of freedom. Technology has improved the quality life of thousands of people who have significant disabilities. I know that each time I can do an action for myself, the feeling is indescribable. This week online, I learned of two children who have experienced the unexpected, thanks to advances in technology. Click here to read the rest of the story

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Epilepsy Seizures May Promote Autism Symptoms in Angleman Syndrome, Study Finds

Epilepsy Seizures May Promote Autism Symptoms in Angelman Syndrome, Study Finds
Written by: Patricia Inacio. Ph.d
Published by: Angelman Syndrome News

Epileptic seizures contribute more than previously thought to autism symptoms in patients with Angelman syndrome, according to researchers.

The study, “Effect of epilepsy on autism symptoms in Angelman syndrome,” was published in the journal Molecular Autism. Autism and epilepsy often co-occur in patients with Angelman syndrome, but the extent to which the association between autism symptoms and epilepsy is due to shared aetiology or to the direct effects of seizures was unclear. Click here to the rest of the story.

Smithsonian Exhibit Puts Focus On Accessible Design

Publisher: Disability Scoop
Written by: Shaun Heasley

From clothing to utensils and computers, a new exhibit is showcasing the varied and increasing ways that today’s world is adapting to accommodate the needs of people with disabilities.

The display at the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum dubbed “Access+Ability” includes over 70 works that highlight how design is making a broad range of experiences more inclusive.

Divided into three sections — moving, connecting and living — the exhibit features the latest in cane technology, clothing with magnets and other accessibility modifications, eye-controlled speech-generating devices and more innovations.

Click here for the rest of the story

Autism and Sensory Overload

Even more challenging, it can be difficult for people with autism to “just ignore” sensory information as it comes in.So, unlike people with typical sensory systems, people on the spectrum may not be able to, for example, notice a car alarm going off and then decide not to listen to it. Some of the environmental challenges that can negatively impact people with autism include Click here to read the rest of the story

Anyone With A Disability Should Relate To Finding Dory

Anyone with a Disability Should Relate to Finding Dory
Source (Cerebral Palsy News Today)
Author: Jessica Grono

Movies are usually liked because they are relatable. Seeing many movies that portray a character with cerebral palsy isn’t very common. There are some, but the character is either sick, dying or wants to die. Either way, they’re unrealistic. However, I felt very positive about the movie Finding Dory.

As a child in the late seventies and early eighties, movies about people with disabilities were scarce. I remember seeing one on television that showed a man falling for a woman in a wheelchair, but she ended up dying in the end anyway. Not very positive. More recently, there is a movie about a man who, despite being well-loved, educated and having a great life, commits suicide because he’s in a wheelchair. Again, it was a terrible representation of people with disabilities. Please click here to read the rest of the story.

Study of Nonverbal Autism Must Go Beyond Words, Says Expert


Source: Spectrum
Author: Sarah Deweedt

Roughly 25 percent of people with autism speak few or no words. A generation ago, that figure was closer to 50 percent. Most researchers agree that the decline is due to the recognition of more people with milder forms of autism, as well as to the advent of early intervention programs  that have helped more children. Click here for the rest of the story.

12 Tips for Teaching Tactile Skills to Struggling Braille Readers

Collage of 12 tips for teaching tactile skills to struggling braille readers
Source: Paths to Literacy

Struggling braille readers may easily become frustrated or discouraged, so it’s critical to find ways to ensure success whenever possible.  Here are some strategies to promote tactile skills with struggling braille readers:

  1. Implement a variety of tactile activities throughout the daily schedule. Students need practice not just reading braille, but also using tactile information.
    • Put an article in a bag and have the student remove it and describe it – NOT tell you what it is. Ask them to think about questions, such as how much does it weigh, how long, what shape, what else might be like this, what is the purpose of the item, how is it different from yesterday’s item, etc. This is a good starter for lessons, introducing seasons of the year, special events, common knowledge, etc.
    • I recall putting a boat in the bag when the movie Titanic was showing.
    • Another example would be a stapler, and then to teach students how to use it. By third grade kids need to use one daily to help their teacher pair braille and print pages.
    • A pen and pencil can help to teach likenesses and differences.
    • Every fruit imaginable showed up in the bag and then we had tasting parties one year.
    • Toys like a yo-yo, or other toys of the day can be put in the bag.
    • Students must answer in complete sentences (no one word answers). In fact students should be taught to respond to all questions in complete sentences.
    • All this ties into improving sentence structure, writing, common knowledge, and even social skills.

Click here to read the rest of the story

Autism Sensory Difficulties and How to Address Them

Autism Sensory Difficulties and How to Address Them

 

 

 

 

 

Source: Durham Region Autism Services

People with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) typically have difficulty processing sensory information such as sounds, sights, and smells. This is usually referred to as having issues with “sensory integration”, or having sensory sensitivity, and is caused by differences in how the brain of a person with ASD understands and prioritizes the sensory information picked up by the body’s many sensory receptors. When this breakdown in communication becomes too intense, the person with ASD may become overwhelmed, anxious, or even feel physical pain. When this occurs, some with ASD may act out. Click here to read the rest of the story.

Troubleshooting Common Problem Areas in Children with Autism

Troubleshooting Common Problem Areas in Children With Autism
Source: Durham Region Autism Services

When dealing with a child on spectrum, the presence of sudden or chronic behaviours that are aggressive, odd, or socially inappropriate can present challenges one may feel ill-equipped to understand and deal with. Being prepared ahead of time can help a great deal in managing these issues in the calm, logical way. The following questions and answers cover some of the most common problems that arise with the behaviour of children (and some adults) who have Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Click here for the rest of the story.