10 Things ADHD Is– and 3 It isn’t

Published by: Self Magazine

Written by: Christiana Stiehl

Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, or ADHD, is one of those mental health conditions that has become cultural shorthand in a pretty inappropriate way. Ignoring the fact that “I’m so ADHD” isn’t even grammatically correct, throwing this acronym around to flippantly explain distraction or disinterest waters down the true meaning of this extremely nuanced disorder. Not only that, it can further isolate those who do have ADHD, since they’re often already misunderstood. To dispel some of the common myths surrounding ADHD, we’ve broken down what the disorder actually is—and a couple things it isn’t, too. Click here to read the rest of the story

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What is Stimming?

Published by: Medical News Today

Written by: Lori Smith

Repetitive body movements or repetitive movement of objects is referred to as self-stimulatory behavior, abbreviated to stimming. Stimming can occur in people with autism and other developmental disabilities.

Some people will stim when nervous, employing behaviors such as pacing, biting their nails, hair twirling, or tapping their feet or fingers.

In this article, we will examine why stimming occurs and the different types that occur. We will also look at what can be done if someone’s stimming behaviors are causing them problems in day-to-day life. Click here to read the rest of the story

What Does OCD Look Like In The Classroom?

 


Published by: Child Mind Institute
Written by: Dr. Jerry Bubrick

For children who have obsessive-compulsive disorder, functioning in school can be complicated and very difficult. And for a teacher, it can be easy to misread the symptoms of OCD as oppositional behavior on the child’s part, or as ADHD.

But if teachers can recognize the behaviors associated with OCD, especially when a child is embarrassed and trying to hide his anxiety, they can help save him to receive treatment or make adjustments to from unnecessary struggle, and clear the way for him to learn successfully. Click here to read the rest of the story.

Children With Autism and Breaks In Routine

Published by: Kid Companion
Written by: Lorna dEntremont

A child with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) may have greater difficulty in accepting changes of routine. This may be due to their greater need for predictability or difficulty when a pattern of routine is disrupted. Vacations, family visits, or field trips can be over-stimulating and distressing for the child with autism. If this is the case with your child, prepare BEFORE a scheduled change in routine occurs like before school breaks and for summer vacation. Click here for the rest of the story

Setting Students With ADHD Up for Success

Published by: Eutopia
Written by: Nina Parrish

Teachers often come to the classroom with an unclear understanding of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and they are rarely provided with strategies that detail how to work with students who have been diagnosed with ADHD, even though such students make up an increasingly large number of their students—11 percent and growing as of 2011, according to data gathered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

As a special education teacher and tutor who coaches struggling students (many with ADHD), I have found several classroom strategies to be effective. Click here for the rest of the story

Emergency Plans Need to Be in Effect for Students with Disabilities

Published by: Cerebral Palsy News Today

Written by: Jessica Grono

School violence, unfortunately, is on the minds of thousands of people. Protection of our children is extremely important, and it is imperative to find the right plan to keep everyone safe. As more schools implement drills and plans to protect children and staff, children with disabilities aren’t included in the planning. How can we, as a nation, fix this huge safety dilemma for students with disabilities? Click here to read the rest of the story

Anxiety, Movement Disorders May Increase With Age in Angelman Patients, Study Finds

Anxiety and movement disorders may increase with age in adults with Angelman syndrome, while the prevalence of seizures may decrease, a study suggests.

The results also call into attention the need for better monitoring and treatment, provided by a multidisciplinary medical team, to improve quality of life in the adult Angelman population. That’s because sleeping, gastrointestinal and bone disorders remain a significant issue for many adults with this condition. Read the rest of the story here

Reducing Stress In Kids


Published by: Stress-Free Kids
Written by: Lori Lite

Children are vulnerable to stress. Thirteen out of one hundred children experience some kind of anxiety disorder and many more are just stressed out! Living a balanced life and reducing stress in kids is a challenge for most families.
With very little effort you can offer your children the tools they need to maintain emotional balance. Consider filling your child’s emotional backpack with solutions and techniques they can use for stress management and relaxation. Kids can be active participants in creating their own healthy, calm lives. Click here to read the rest of the story

 

Surfing as therapy for autism: Ocean Heroes charity helps children find connection


Published by: ABC News
Written by: Eliza Laschon

Learning to surf is proving to be a tonic for children with autism, helping them become calmer and more confident after a morning in the swell on Perth’s coastline with volunteers from a surfing charity.

The organisation was set up by a group of surfing mates last year and parents of children who have participated have been blown away by the positive results.

Judi Barrett-Lennard said her son William had “very low-functioning autism”.

“There’s a huge improvement once he has been in the water,” Mrs Barrett-Lennard said. Click here to read the rest of the story

New report shows slight uptick in autism prevalence

Published by: Spectrum
Written by: Jessica Wright

About 1 in 59 children in the United States has autism, according to data released today by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Four times as many boys as girls have the condition, according to the report1.

The data are based on a 2014 survey of 325,483 children across 11 states. The data were collected by the CDC’s Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring Network (ADDM).

These numbers show an increase of nearly 16 percent from the previous prevalence of 1 in 68 children. That estimate was based on data collected in 2012 and had a gender ratio of 4.5 to 1. Click here to read the rest of the story.