May Special Needs Articles

Welcome to the May article links. These are articles that I tweeted and or received from viewers during the month of May on special needs and developmental disability topics. Enjoy!

5 things I learned from being an autism dad (Fatherly)

7 toilet training tips that help nonverbal kids with autism (Autism Speaks)

8 ingenious innovations helping autistic children communicate (Mashable)

9 important things autism moms want people to know (Autism Magazine)

10 steps to include students with autism in general education classrooms (Think Inclusive)

After an autism diagnosis: 13 necessary next steps for parents (Thinking Person’s Guide to Autism)

An overlooked resource- people with disabilities (Think Inclusive)

Author tells own story of life with cerebral palsy (Madison Magazine)

Autism: The hidden talent that shows up in the workplace (Business Standard)

Gaming may help kids with ADHD (The Newspaper)

How to help children with autism make, and keep friends (Chicago Tribune)

Kids treated for ADHD can still struggle in school, especially girls (Reuters)

The joys and challenges of being a parent with autism (The Atlantic)

Using visual schedules to get a child with autism organized in 45 minutes (Autismag)

What sensory processing disorder says about autism (Spectrum)

Talking About Autism, Listen To Families


Source: The Spectrum News
Author: Shannon Des Roches Rosa

I take a deep breath before reading any article, popular or scientific, about autism. I steel myself because most of these stories paint people like my curly-haired, autistic teenage son as burdens to their families — as changelings or enigmas. I love my son Leo fiercely and consider him none of those things, so these stories hurt. My adult autistic friends are even more pained than I am by these puzzlingly negative portrayals. Click here to read the rest of the story

April Special Needs Article Links

Welcome to the April article links. These are articles that I tweeted and or received from viewers during the month of April on special needs and developmental disability topics. Enjoy!

5 practical ways to help adults with autism gain employment (Autism Parenting Magazine)

10 things I wish the entertainment industry understood about autism (The Mighty)

20 tips on employment for students with disabilities (The Inclusion Lab)

Autism and parent fatigue (Autism Awareness Centre, Inc.)

Grandparents may be first to spot autism in a child (NHS)

How animals can help autistic children  (The Conversation)

Making art galleries autism friendly (A.N)

Moms work to empower children and adults with autism (ABC News)

New guideline tackles sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (Neurology Advisor)

Robots helping to teach students with autism in West Vancouver– (Global News)

Stop telling me I don’t look autistic (Metro)

Teaching Important life skills to kids with autism (Nurse Barb’s Daily Dose)

The innovating creative superpower of ADHD (Yes Magazine)

What teachers should know about ADHD and ASD (Edutopia)

When a child with autism gets lost (HuffPost)

Maternal Anxiety and Depression May Affect the Quality of Life of Children with Cerebral Palsy

Mother’s Anxiety or Depression Affects Her Child’s Quality of Life, Study Suggests
Source: Cerebral Palsy News Today

A new study suggests that maternal anxiety and depression may affect the quality of life of children with cerebral palsy (CP).

The study, “Impact of Symptoms of Maternal Anxiety and Depression on Quality of Life of children with Cerebral Palsy,” was recently published in the journal Archives of Neuropsychiatry.

CP is a leading cause of physical disability.  A heterogenous condition, it causes motor and sensory impairment, negatively affecting quality of life (QOL). However, that QOL in CP patients is multidimensional, and can be affected by other variables, including the person’s specific type of CP, cognitive function, and other medical disorders. Click here to read the rest of the story.

March Special Needs Article Links

Welcome to the March article links. These are articles that I tweeted and or received from viewers during the month of March on special needs and developmental disability topics. Enjoy!

3 key lessons no one told about dyslexia (The Pavlovic Today)

7 key social skills to help children with autism cope with bullying (Upbility)

7 signs adult ADHD might be interfering with your performance at work (Techco)

7 tips for motivating kids on the autism spectrum (PopSugar)

11 signs of autism in girls (Very Well)

Helping Asperger’s teens transition to college (My Asperger’s Child)

Helping your ADHD child with homework (Healthy Place)

Is sensory processing disorder the same as sensory processing sensitivity? (The Highly Sensitive Person)

Organization and attention challenges related to sensory processing disorder (The O.T. Toolbox)

Parents: Don’t hide your children’s autism diagnoses from them (Thinking Person’s Guide to Autism)

Sensory processing disorder at home ideas (Kids Activities Blog)

Sleep strategies for kids with autism and sensory needs (And Next Comes L)

What an autistic shutdown is like for me (The Mighty)

What teachers should know about ADHD and ASD (Edutopia)

 

Resources Scarce for Adults With Autism


Source:(The Gazette)
Writer: Liz Zabel

Leah Parker wasn’t diagnosed with autism until she was 18.

Despite recognizing the symptoms in her behavior, the 19-year-old University of Iowa English major said her parents had trouble believing her.

Maybe it’s because she got “good at pretending and blending in” by studying others, even though it didn’t feel natural. Or perhaps it’s because her special interest in dogs is socially acceptable enough to “slip by without people noticing,” she said.

But when the doctors delivered the news that she is, in fact, autistic, her parents were shocked.

“A lot of people seem to think it’s much more rare than it actually is,” Parker said. “They have a picture in their head that everybody who is autistic is Rain Man or something People just know a lot more autistic people than they realize.” Click here to read the rest of the story

Autism and Managing Multi-Tasking and Memory


Source: (Huffington Post)
Writer: Mary Bailey

There are studies and articles that explore the mysteries of multi-tasking and memory in the life of individuals with autism, but there are still huge question marks which have yet to be answered. In my own search for the keys to Chase’s brain, I learned that researchers have discovered that the brains of children with autism are inflexible at rest-to-task performance. This basically means that specific brain connections do not change or function as they should, when switching from a resting-state to a task-state. There can also be impairments in the parts of the brain responsible for prospective memory (remembering things that need to be done in the future) and retrospective memory (remembering things that occurred in the past). Click here to read the rest of the story

Tax Planning for Parents of Children with Autism (And Special Needs)

Tax Planning for Parents of Children with Autism
Source: (Parenting Special Needs Magazine)
Author: Karen F. Greenberg, CFP

Parents or other caregivers of loved ones with autism may qualify for valuable tax benefits, which may be overlooked by some tax preparers who are unfamiliar with the autism spectrum disorder. These unique tax benefits may entitle parents to additional refunds of thousands of dollars.

Families often incur a myriad of expenses because of their child’s treatment and life style expenses many of which are deductible as medical expenses. Taxpayers who itemize deductions can claim medical expenses to the extent that they exceed 7.5 percent of adjusted gross income .The challenge is to be aware of which expenses may be allowable and to keep track of them. Click here to read the rest of the story.

 

February Special Needs Article Links

Welcome to the February links. These are articles that I tweeted and or received from viewers during the month of February on special needs and developmental disability topics. Enjoy!

specialneedslinks

10 fun activities for children with autism (education.com)

12 things to remember when working with challenging students (Think Inclusive)

Autism awareness and wandering- tips for parents and the wider community (Patient Talk)

Adults with autism: Scarce funds and wait lists (WUWF)

Adults with autism see interests as strengths, career paths (NYU)

Imaging study confirms differences in ADHD brains (The Conversation)

Justice side with Michigan girl in dispute over service dog (ABCNews)

Sensory processing disorder and autism: Task and the picky eater (Aspergers 101)

Supporting students with autism in the classroom: What teachers need to know (My Disability Matters)

 

 

Good Communication Can Make Medical Visits More Successful For Patients With Autism

Hospital, Doctor, Nurse, Medical, Health, Professional
Source: (News Medical)

Doctor visits can be a challenge for patients with autism, their families and health care providers. Kristin Sohl, associate professor of child health at the University of Missouri, offers several steps providers and families can take to make medical visits more successful. She says that all of them require good communication between the provider and parent before, during and after medical visits.

Before a Visit

“Parents or caregivers should call ahead to the provider’s office to discuss individual accommodations that the patient might need during the visit, such as a comfort item or a distraction toy,” Sohl said. “Tell the office staff if there have been prior negative experiences—or successful ones—so the office can provide a supportive environment and avoid triggering anxiety in the patient.” Click here to read the rest of the story.