5 common learning disabilities

Published by: Washington Times Herald
Written by: Metro Creative Connection

Students are often told that hard work is the path to success. Individuals who have learning disabilities may have to work even harder than their peers to be successful.

The Learning Disabilities Association of America says learning disabilities occur due to neurobiological and/or genetic factors that alter the way the brain functions. This can affect one or more cognitive processes related to learning and interfere with various skills, potentially preventing a person from acquiring the same amount of knowledge as others of the same age.

There are many learning disabilities, and the following are five of the most common, according to LD Resources Foundation, Inc., a nonprofit organization that helps find solutions to those who are affected by learning disabilities.

1. Dyslexia: This learning disability can impede a person’s ability to read and comprehend text. Students may have trouble with phonemic awareness, or the way to break down words. Similar problems with phonological processing, or distinguishing between similar word sounds, can occur as well.

2. ADHD: Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder is marked by behaviors that make it difficult to pay attention and stay on task. The Masters in Special Education, a resource for finding work and study in special education concentrations, says there is debate over whether ADHD is a learning disability. But there is no denying that ADHD can impede success in school settings.

Click here to read the rest of the story

ADHD Time Blindness Contributes to My Impulse Spending

Published by: Health.com
Written by: Mikhal Weiner

For me, the worst part of ADHD isn’t being fidgety or hyper-focused; it’s under-discussed symptoms such as time blindness and impulsive spending—which have made my finances a constant struggle.

ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) is often associated solely with the obvious symptoms—such as fidgeting, cutting up in class, and general disorganization. While this is an accurate description of certain aspects of ADHD, there are far more (often overlooked) symptoms of this disorder—that wildly affect the lives of those, like me, with ADHD.

For me, those underreported symptoms include time blindness as well as impulsive spending—symptoms that have made managing my finances a constant struggle. Even though I usually manage to keep away from overspending, I can only achieve this by keeping myself on a very short (at times, painful) leash. Click here to read the rest of the story.

Quick reaction and determination lead to amazing recovery for man with spinal cord injury

Published by: UC Davis Health

Jasminder Singh recently proposed to his girlfriend of one year. He picked the perfect spot, the right moment and knelt on one knee to pop the question.

 Jasminder Singh, left, wrecked his ATV in 2019 and paramedics thought he might never walk again.

But the fact that he could perform the simple act of kneeling — let alone that he’s alive — can be traced back to the quick thinking and surgical expertise to the team of neurological surgeons at UC Davis Health.

They said “quadriplegic”

On July 7, 2019, Singh and a buddy were riding ATVs at a state park in Northern California. After riding several trails that he said were “nothing crazy,” they opted for one final lap. It would be his last lap ever.

“I took a turn on a bank with wet and loose dirt,” Singh recalled. “The ATV fishtailed and thew me over the side. I tumbled 10 to 20 feet and landed on my neck.”

Never having broken a bone, Singh thought his arms and legs were broken. The arrival of the Folsom Fire Department made him realize the situation was far graver.

“They didn’t say paralyzed, they said quadriplegic,” Singh said. “Next thing you know I’m in the back of the ambulance and, luckily, headed to UC Davis Medical Center.”

He arrived at UC Davis Health in the Emergency Department, where a neurosurgery resident on duty that Sunday afternoon was quick to evaluate and facilitate surgical treatment.

“Jas couldn’t move his legs. An MRI showed damage to his spinal cord,” explained Kee Kim, chief of spinal neurosurgery. “There was a possibility he may not walk again. I knew it was best to get him into the operating room sooner rather than later.” Click here to read the rest of the story

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome is preventable

Published by: Daily News
Written by: Kevin Green

FASD (Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Disorder) is a condition that results from alcohol exposure during the mother’s pregnancy. FASD causes brain damage and growth problems. The problems vary from child to child, but defects are not reversible.

The fetus can be affected regardless of the amount or frequency of alcohol consumed by the mother. Each year 630,000 babies with FASD are born globally. The average life expectancy of people with FASD is 34 years of age, with extreme causes accounting for 44% of all deaths. Not only will alcohol lead to various physical defects including brain malformation, but mental issues and neurological problems. FASD is 100% preventable.

Disabilities can vary from abnormal appearance, shorter height, hyperactivity, learning disabilities, poor judgment skills, vision and hearing problems, and problems with the heart, kidneys, and bones.

Distinctive facial features include small eyes, an exceptionally small upper lip, a short upturned nose, and a smooth skin surface between the nose and upper lip.

Drinking alcohol during pregnancy allows alcohol to enter the bloodstream and reaches the developing fetus by crossing the placenta. Alcohol causes higher blood alcohol concentrations in your developing baby than in the mother’s body because the fetus metabolizes the alcohol slower than an adult does. Alcohol interferes with the delivery of oxygen and optimum nutrition to your developing baby.

Exposure to alcohol before birth can harm the development of tissues and organs, causing permanent brain damage in your baby. Click here to read the rest of the story

HOW TO USE AN EARLY WARNING SYSTEM FOR SEPSIS IN THE EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT

Published by: Health Leaders
Written by: Christopher Cheney

A sepsis early warning system at a Cleveland-based health system triggered an alert in the electronic health record and a notification message to emergency department pharmacists.

An early warning system for sepsis embedded in an electronic health record (EHR) can have a significant impact on sepsis care, according to a recent research article.

Sepsis is a life-threatening condition caused by the body’s extreme reaction to an infection. Annually, at least 1.7 million American adults develop sepsis and about 270,000 Americans die due to sepsis, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The recent research article, which was published by Critical Care Medicine, describes the results of a randomized, controlled quality improvement initiative conducted at The MetroHealth System in Cleveland. The article features data collected from 598 patients, with 285 patients in the intervention group and 313 in the standard care group.

The intervention involved using a sepsis early warning system embedded in the health system’s EHR. The early warning system is based on structured EHR variables used to predict whether a patient will develop sepsis during their hospitalization. The variables include demographic data, Click here to read the rest of the article