We are alone in this together

Published by: Cerebral Palsy News
Written by: Briana Beaver

“This pandemic is really working for you,” my mom said, half-jokingly. She nor I never could have imagined that over the course of only weeks, society would rearrange itself into a more Briana-friendly place. The “awkward” social necessities characteristic of my interactions with others have now become the norm.

For years, I have received critical looks upon entering a public space wearing a mask. When I would ask people not to stand close to me, to refrain from touching me because of my immunocompromised state, people would look at me strangely. Trying to explain to others that I have been isolated in my home because of environmental health triggers has been met with skepticism. Suddenly, social distancing and quarantining have become the rule, not the exception.

The ability of society to reorganize with warp speed is something to behold. The countless years during which I attempted to legitimize my health needs and requisite social arrangements have felt fruitless. I’ve lost friends and watched sprouting relationships fade into the background because others could not understand my life. The cultural repercussions of the pandemic are providing us with a unique opportunity not only to legitimize the various needs of those with chronic health conditions and disabilities, but also to increase awareness about the flexibility of humanity. Click here to read the rest of the story.

“What I Learned About My ADHD Brain on Quarantine”

Published by: ADDitude
Written by: Laura Creedle

My daughter is a first-year medical student. A few weeks ago, she flew to a medical conference in New York. As I write this, traveling on an airplane seems like a delightfully whimsical concept from an earlier time — like eating ice cream in a public place, or sending your kids to school.

After her trip to New York, my daughter came home for a brief visit. And then we got word that people who had been at the conference were testing positive for COVID-19. We were told by her medical school that we should quarantine for two weeks, just to be safe.

Many people under quarantine suffer from a sense of isolation, and while I do have great sympathy for them, that’s not been my experience. My nephew, his wife, and their baby live with us. My son was home for spring break. In total, there were seven of us in the house. That’s a lot of people in one house, especially when one is a demanding toddler. Click here to read the rest story.

Having ADHD vs. Living With It

Published by: PsychCentral
Written by: Neil Petersen

When we talk about ADHD in general, we often talk about it from the perspective of something that is looked at from the outside. We talk about symptoms that can be observed, and we talk about people with ADHD or people who have ADHD.

But if you actually are one of those people, you experience ADHD from the inside, which is a little different. That’s why when I’m talking about the experience of having ADHD, I often find myself referring to people who live with ADHD rather than people who have ADHD.

ADHD is something that, when it affects you personally, is a constant and inseparable part of your life.

My shoes are something that I have. My keys are something that I have (on a good day). My ADHD, however, is something that I live with.

One of the biggest challenges to coping with ADHD, and often one of the biggest obstacles to diagnosis, is being able to match up your lived experience of ADHD from the inside with clinical descriptions of what ADHD looks like from the outside. Click here to read the rest of the story.

 

‘I didn’t find out I was dyslexic until I was 21 and training to be a journalist’

Published by: WalesOnline
Written by: Bronte Howard

Most people would love to be intelligent, creative, critical thinkers who have a knack for seeing the bigger picture.

Who wouldn’t? They’re a great set of life skills that come in handy in whatever you want to be.

But what if in turn, you had to spend your school years struggling to keep up with your peers and even as an adult, had difficulty spelling simple words?

Well, just like a coin – dyslexia has two sides to it.  Click here to read the rest of the story.

10 Passover Craft Activities

Passover,m also known as Pesach is the Jewish festival celebrating the exodus of the Israelite’s from Egyptian slavery. There are craft ideas in the link below that are fun as well as improving fine motor skills including writing, cutting, gluing, painting and buttoning.

Other skills developed from these activities include attention to task, following directions, following two- step commands, and listening.

8 fun crafts to get kids ready for Passover

8 Passover activities to do with your kids

9 great Passover crafts

10 kid friendly crafts for Passover

15 DIY Passover Seder plates your kids will love to make

15 Passover games and activities

Passover activity pages for kids

Passover crafts for kids

Passover teacher resources

Planning a child-friendly Seder

Parents of children living with Autism face unique challenges during COVID-19 restrictions

Published by: WBTV
Written by: Amanda Foster

Families everywhere are facing new challenges involved with suddenly teaching kids from home.It is a total shift in routine and a big adjustment for many families, and a unique challenge for parents of children who live with Autism.Lori Price’s dining room looks like many others right now – papers strewn across the table, kids learning from home because of COVID-19.But the reality for this Gastonia mom is that setting up learning experiences for her kids can be a little different than it is for others.“We’re in a time right now where everything’s different, and it’s not working for these kids,” Price says.Her 8-year-old son Damien lives with autism, and her 11-year-old daughter Alex with ADHD. With children who experience challenges with changes in routine, it makes a big shift like this difficult. “Right now, we are far from routine,” she says. “Every day, it’s something’s changing.” Click here to read the ret of the story

Coronavirus Ireland: Being stuck at home is extra stressful for autistic people says Adam Harris CEO of AsIAm

Published by: Irish Mirror
Written by; Marguerite Kiely

The Covid-19 crisis has brought uncertainty into all our lives, with our day-to-day routine severely disrupted.

The autistic community, however, is particularly vulnerable to the huge change, as the loss of structure from their lives can be a source of enormous anxiety and distress.Adam Harris, founder and CEO of AsIAm, has revealed the issues autistic people face at this difficult time and what their parents can do to help.

He explained: “What we have seen over the last few weeks is the complete removal of routine. That’s a real challenge and there is a need to create a new structure as a result.

“For many autistic people going places may be a very important part of their routine. Maybe they go to a certain cafe on a particular day of the week or like to walk in the park every evening.

“All of those opportunities are being removed and it doesn’t just cause upset, it removes the certainty and predictability for the person.” Click here to read the rest of the story.

Special Needs COVID-19 Resources and Information

Hi Everyone, Like most people in the world, the COVID-19 Virus has greatly impacted my own little universe. Living in the epicenter of the virus at last count, almost 4,000 people in my county have tested positive. I too seek ways to live a normal life in these trying times.  Its been very challenging to continue to write articles on special needs with so much is going on in the world.

Looking to see how I can help others during this time, I created COVID-19 virus page which I will continue to add more information as we learn more. I advise you to stay tune to both local news and get regular updates from the CDC as they update on a regular basis. If you are a reader from another County, please check on updates from your government on a regular basis.

Please all stay safe during these trying times, continue to help one another and we will come out from this better and stronger.

 

Articles on what you need to know about the COVID-19 Virus:

CDC

CNET.Com

RWJ Barnabas Health

Washington Post

UNICEF- What parents should know

CDC Resources

Cases in the United States

Community and Faith Based Leaders

How to prepare

Guidance for Schools and Childcare Programs

Travel

The following are free social stories on Teachers Pay Teachers Must have a log on account):

COVID-19 No Print Social Story

COVID 19 and Social distancing Story

COVID 19 Social Narrative

Social Narrative for Autism

The following links and information comes  from the U.S. Education Department. Check for updated information:

Additional Resources for Higher Education Institutions:

Schools should continue promoting everyday disease prevention strategies:

  • If you are sick, stay home from school.
  • Avoid close contact with those who are already sick.
  • Cover your nose and mouth when coughing or sneezing with a tissue or the crook of your arm.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water.
  • Avoid touching eyes, nose, or mouth.
  • Consult this web page for further guidance from the U.S. Department of Education.

Schools can share relevant CDC fact sheets to help students, families, and staff understand COVID-19 along with steps they can take to protect themselves:

COVID-19 and Special Needs

Best practices in using telemedicine for ADHD during the COVID-19 pandemic

Coronavirus and Anxiety

How to help a child with autism adjust

Supporting families through COVID-19

Handwashing

CDC- Handwashing Training and Education-Includes lessons and activities for all ages including a 30-page PDF and age appropriate handwashing curriculum.

Free Printables– Activities from nourishinteractive.com, includes handwashing worksheets, lesson plans and a math sequencing worksheet that teaches the important steps to good handwashing techniques.

Kids Handwashing Coloring Page– Developed by Lancaster County Health Department including 2 coloring pages and instructions on how to wash your hands properly.

Teach-nology- A lesson plan for kids pre-school age which discusses germs and how germs make people sick.

Why We Wash Our Hands– From Florida Health Department for children ages 3-41/2. The lesson educates children on how to prevent common health problems by developing handwashing skills.

The following articles are links to articles specific to handwashing and the COVID-19 virus:

CDC- Handwashing and Prevention

Family Doctor

UNICEF

USAToday

The following are worksheets to keep your little ones busy during this time:

Identify Money Freebie

Free Printable Money WorkSheets

Free Skip Counting by 5″s Worksheet

 

Getting Self Help With ADHD

Published by: ADHD Man of DistrAction
Written by: Kelly Babcock

I’ve had ADHD all my life, I guess. Though, of course, when I was younger it would have been harder to detect, since both childhood and ADHD are afflictions denoted by being not completely developed yet.

The first sad thing about that statement is that it makes people think that we are childish.

The second, but bigger sad thing about that statement is that the childish thing is, though damned insulting, also accurate.

I mean, technically, of course.

Truth of it …

There is a freedom of spirit that comes with ADHD that we enjoy and that others are attracted to. We attract people because we are fun and somewhat exciting to be around.

Life is not dull around us. A person with ADHD can be a vortex of activity, a tornado of plans and schemes and attempts at instant gratification, and impetuous sudden decisions to have fun in yet another way.

All of these things are exactly why children have so much fun. Click here to read the rest of the story

 

Many doctors aren’t addressing safe sex, driver readiness with teens who have a history of ADHD

Published by: Philly Voice
Written by: Tracey Romero

Primary care doctors need to more closely monitor the health risks of teenagers with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, particularly in regard to two classic teenage thrills – driving and sex, researchers say.

Children diagnosed with ADHD before age 10 are at increased risk for sexually-transmitted diseases and car accidents, previous research has shown. But a new Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia study found that only 1 in 2 teens with a history of ADHD receives a safe sex talk from their doctor. And far fewer discuss their readiness to drive. “Although doctors do a good job screening for many behavioral health risks, like suicide risk and depression, we need to be more aware of the dangers associated with driving and sexual health,” said Thomas Power, director of CHOP’s Center for Management of ADHD.

“For example, our previous research shows teens with ADHD are more likely to be involved in a car accident particularly in the first month after receiving their driver’s license, so this is definitely an issue that should be discussed with our patients.” Click here to read the rest of the story.