COVID-19 and Handwashing Powerpoint

Most news today whether it is social media, newsprint or broadcasting, focuses on the crisis of the COVID-19. It seems information changes everyday and we are still learning ways to protect ourselves. When the news of COVID-19 first appear, there was emphasis on the implications for people who have severe underlying conditions  such as heart or lung disease and diabetes. The picture painted were people that were over the age of 65 who were more likely to be at risk for developing serious complications from COVID-19.

It occurred to me that very little information indicated that people with disabilities and special risk also fall under the high risk category. for us who are parents or professionals  (in some cases both), we know the dangers of this deadly disease for children and adults with serious medical issues.

Many special needs children and adults have co-occurring issues including chronic heart disease, GI issues, diabetes, asthma, seizure disorders, GERD, and breathing issues.

For this reason, it is all the more reason to ensure that professionals, frontline staff and families know how to hand wash properly.  The Powerpoint focuses on the transmission of the virus as well as the appropriate way to wash hands. You will find the link to the Powerpoint at the bottom of the page.

COVID-19 and Hand Washing

Coronavirus Ireland: Being stuck at home is extra stressful for autistic people says Adam Harris CEO of AsIAm

Published by: Irish Mirror
Written by; Marguerite Kiely

The Covid-19 crisis has brought uncertainty into all our lives, with our day-to-day routine severely disrupted.

The autistic community, however, is particularly vulnerable to the huge change, as the loss of structure from their lives can be a source of enormous anxiety and distress.Adam Harris, founder and CEO of AsIAm, has revealed the issues autistic people face at this difficult time and what their parents can do to help.

He explained: “What we have seen over the last few weeks is the complete removal of routine. That’s a real challenge and there is a need to create a new structure as a result.

“For many autistic people going places may be a very important part of their routine. Maybe they go to a certain cafe on a particular day of the week or like to walk in the park every evening.

“All of those opportunities are being removed and it doesn’t just cause upset, it removes the certainty and predictability for the person.” Click here to read the rest of the story.