November Special Needs Article Links

specialneedslinks

Welcome to the November links. These are articles that I tweeted and or received from viewers during the month of November on special needs and developmental disability topics. Enjoy!

5 simple but important ways to help include kids with autism

14-Year Old with Asperger’s syndrome makes debut as an author

Activism and Advocacy- The Road from here to now

Autism: Parents face challenges too

Autism is seen as a male thing- but girls just implode emotionally

Children with autism may be over-diagnosed with ADHD: Study

Concussions are more prevalent in teens with ADHD

Dealing with sensory overload during the holidays

Employers are letting down people with autism

Mother and daughter share their struggles with dyslexia

Not letting ADHD get in the way of managing a business

Supreme Court hears service dog case

Utah adolescents with autism get own ‘high school,’ prevocational education

Woman with Down syndrome becomes the first teacher in Latin America

October Special Needs Article Links

specialneedslinks

Welcome to the October links. These are articles that I tweeted and or received from viewers during the month of October on special needs and developmental disability topics. Enjoy!

4 ways parents of children with special needs can prepare for a natural disaster (Think Inclusive)

10 lessons I learned while parenting through sensory processing disorder (Scary Mommy)

10 things people with autism want you to know (Autism Speaks)

A year later, how Microsoft’s job program for people with autism is working (Geek Wire)

Adults with sensory processing disorder, you are not alone (Sensory Spectrum)

Artists with autism encounters people to see the world differently (Evening Standard)

Autism and Anxiety: 15 things to know about dealing with a double diagnosis (The Autism Site)

Clever ideas to make classes ADHD friendly (Blog Talk Radio)

Exercise gives children with autism a jump on social skills (Spectrum)

Girls with ADHD may face higher risk for more severe mental disorders (UPI)

How I’ve made progress with my love-hate sensory relationship with socks (The Mighty)

The world I see as a person with autism spectrum disorder (The Mighty)

Top things parents should know about autism (Natural News)

You’re autistic. You know you can do a good job, but will employers listen? (The Washington Post).

Transition Planning Timeline

Click here for a printed version

One of the goals of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act is to include transition planning services for all special education students at age 16. Transition planning is mandated through IDEA 2004 which serves to help students begin the process of preparing for post-school activities including, postsecondary education, vocational education, integrated employment and adult services. A timeline will help you stay focused on achieving each step.

The law states transition planning should begin no later than 16 years old or before. It is recommended transition planning should begin by age 14 since services are different in the adult services world including long waiting list depending on where you live and what services are available.

14 Years Old
  • Transition planning should begin no later than when your child is 14.4- It is the law in most states.
  • Begin to research agencies who provide services for individuals with disabilities
  • IEP meeting should focus on the student’s needs, interest in preparation for adulthood
  • Research various aspects of transition services
  • Begin to explore recreation activities
15 Years Old
  • Develop a vision statement
  • Transition goals should be part of the IEP
  • Begin to discuss home services
  • Attend information fairs that offer information on future planning including residential, guardianship and employment
  • Start planning an independence plan at home where possible
16 Years Old
  • Transition goals at the IEP meetings should be updated.
  • Confirm how long students will attend high school- 4 years or until age 21
  • Start the process of getting referrals to your state agency
  • Begin researching adult services and programs. Some waitlist can last for years
  • Initiate application to adult service agencies
17 Years Old
  • Confirm a graduation date
  • Update transition goals in the IEP
  • Begin to invite adult service providers to IEP
  • Begin to investigate guardianship information and the process
18 Years Old
  • Adult eligibility should be completed
  • Apply for SSI (Supplemental Security Income) and Medicaid.
  • Visit adult providers programs
  • Attend job fairs if appropriate
  • Establish legal guardianship if necessary
  • Explore future planning
18-21 Years Old
  • Refine vision statement
  • Revise and update IEP goals
  • Invite transition coordinator your child’s IEP meeting
  • Explore and obtain necessary funding for adult programs
  • Ensure there is a plan for medical/health coverage
  • Confirm all support services are in place.

Below is a free transition printable planning checklist. Feel free to download the PDF.

transition-planning

transition-planning-checklist

October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month

national disability monthNational Disability Employment Awareness is recognized each October to highlight the workforce contributions of people with disabilities.

Facts:

  • Only 20 percent of the labor force with disabilities are employed.
  • 59% of the people with hearing impairments were employed.
  • 41% of people with visual disabilities were employed.

16% of people with severe disabilities work full-time.

Check out this infographic!

disability employemnt

What can you do in your organization to recognize National Disability Employment Awareness Month?

Train frontline staff on the facts

Reach out to local media

Proactively recruit people with disabilities

Review company policies and procedures

Conduct training for supervisors on understanding their role in fostering an inclusive workplace culture

Participate in a disability mentoring day

Conduct a training on disability history.