Autism and Post-Secondary Education

According to the U.S. census, over a half million autistic students will turn 18 over the next decade/ Further studies show that many students diagnosed with autism are not prepared for the transition. Some and their families are opting towards a college education. More colleges are offering support services to autistic students including social, academic, and life skills.

The following resources provide information and articles on autism and college preparation:

11 tips for students with autism who are going to college (KFM)

20 great scholarship for students on the autism spectrum

College Autism Network (CAN)

College planning for autistic students (USC Marshall)

College students with autism need support to succeed on campus (Spectrum)

Families: Learn how to find autism-friendly colleges (U.S. News)

Going to college with autism (Child Mind Institute)

Helping students with autism thrive: College life on the spectrum (Madison House Autism Foundation)

Neurodiversity and autism in college (Psychology Today)

The transition to college can be tough, even more so if you have autism (Washington Post)

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Celebrating Nerodiversity: Embracing people for what they are

Celebrating Neurodiversity: Embracing people for what they are

 

 

 

 

Source: (Durham Region Autism Services)

The term “neurodiversity” was first pioneered in the late 1990’s by two forward-thinking individuals: journalist Harvey Blume and autism advocate Judy Singer. Blume and Singer both believed that the ‘Neurologically Different’ deserve their own political category, standing alongside the familiar ones of class, gender, and race and working to augment the rights and redefine common perceptions of the neurodiverse.

It was Blume and Singer’s wish to see the neurodiverse perceived in light of their strengths as well as their weaknesses. They noted, for example, that those with dyslexia often show above-average visual thinking abilities and entrepreneurial knack. Those with ADHD have a penchant for creative problem solving on the fly. They are typically very imaginative and excel in holistic problem processing that is based on imagination rather than working memory. People on the autism spectrum often show an unusual affinity for mathematics and computer programming. Those who struggle with mental illness, though their challenges may be many, often come up with unique and insightful ways to cope, and frequently exhibit heightened creativity. Click here to read the rest of the story