Autism and Meltdown Resources

       Children with sensory issues including sensory integration disorder, Autism and ADHD may experience a meltdown due to feeling overwhelmed when there is too much sensory information to process.

The folllowing are useful resources to aid in calming:

Blankets- Helps in calming and improving attention and also decreases sensory behaviors by providing deep pressure touch

DIY-  How to make a weighted blanket

Etsy Shop

Mosaic Weighted blankets

Salt of the Earth Gear

Sensa Calm

Sensory Goods

The Magic Blanket

Swings– Will calm a child with autism by organizing and regulating the sensory system.

eSpecial Needs

Fun and Function

Sensory Edge

Sensory Goods

Southpaw

Vest- The weighted vest helps children stay calm and focused by stimulating their muscles through deep pressure.

Autistic Weighted Vest

Fun and Function

Pressure-Vest.com

Therapy Shoppe

Articles

3 ways to deal with autistic children’s meltdowns

5 things about autism meltdowns

10 tips to calm down an autistic child in meltdown

Autism meltdown-management 101: Key points for parents and teachers

Autistic meltdown or temper tantrum?

Fears, anxieties, sensory issues and meltdowns

How to handle the 4 most challenging autism behaviors

Mood instability and meltdowns

The cycle of tantrums, rage and meltdowns

The difference between tantrums and meltdowns (Understood)

What a meltdown feels like for someone with autism (The Mighty)

Why the meltdowns? (Autism Mind)

 

Person-Centered Planning Tool Resources

What is Person-Centered Planning?

Person-Centered Planning (PCP) is a set of approaches designed to assist someone to plan their life and supports. It is used as a life planning model to enable individuals with disabilities to increase their personal self-determination and improve their own independence.

A person-centered plan is use to communicate who they are, their likes and dislikes, to express their wants and needs and what works for them.

Resources and Templates– An information and resource site for person-centered thinking, planning and practices including tools, templates and planning for older adults.
Manual for Person-Centered Planning Facilitators– Created for person-centered planning facilitators developed by the Institute on Community Integration UAP University of Minnesota. Contains topics on preparing a checklist, facilitating a plan, follow-up and challenging situations with difficult group members.
Circle of Support Workbook– Developed by the Foundation for People with Learning Disabilities. Provides an introduction to starting a circle of support group for individuals with disabilities.

Various Approaches

Essential Lifestyle Planning- A guide process designed to help the person discover what matters to them the most.

Essential Lifestyle Planning Forms- The Delaware Division of Developmental Disabilities Services provide planning form tools including personal profile, and workbook.

MAPS

Inclusion Press– Resources available  to purchase and download for free. Information on person-centered planning- PATH, MAPS and Circle of Support. The website also includes resources on inclusion.
Person-Centered Planning Relationship Map– Free download relationship map including instructions on completing the map.

PATH- Planning Alternative Tomorrows’ with Hope- uses a visual tool to detail the future

Personal Futures Planning- An ongoing process where the team replaces system-centered methods with person-centered planning.

A Brief Guide to Personal Futures Planning – A 25 page booklet which provides information on building a personal profile, using MAPS, and components of the Personal Futures Planning process.
Planning for the Future– A workbook to help students, their families and professionals to plan for life after high school. Using a person-centered approach to identify the student’s strength.

Person centered planning

Person centered planning education site

Person centered planning-supported decision-making

Autism Spectrum Disorder and Meltdowns

Both children and adults  with autism often display a co-occurring disorder of anxiety. Meltdown typically occur when an event triggers a reaction which can be due to a new or unfamiliar situation that is seen as a potential threat.

The following articles provide information on managing autistic meltdowns:

11 things autistic people say can trigger  meltdown

How autistic meltdown differ from ordinary temper tantrums

How to ease autism meltdowns on the go

How to handle meltdowns

Managing autism meltdowns, tantrums and aggression 

Tantrum vs. autistic meltdown: what is the difference? 

The difference between meltdown and tantrums

What is an autism meltdown?

What it’s like to have a severe autism meltdown

When my son with autism melts down, here’s what I do

Autism and Mental Health Resources

 

5 ways to help reduce anxiety in children with autism

Anxiety: children and teenagers with autism spectrum disorder

How can you support your teenager with autism spectrum disorder if they are depressed

Managing anxiety and depressive symptoms in adults with autism spectrum disorder

Managing anxiety in children with autism

Mental health and autism

Mental heath treatment for people with autism spectrum disorder

The deep emotional ties between depression and autism

The essential guide to anxiety and autism

Treating mental health disorders in kids on the autism spectrum

What is Childhood Disintegrative Disorder?

Did you know that Childhood Disintegrative Disorder is  considered part of Autism Spectrum?

Childhood Disintegrative Disorder (CDD) is a condition where a child develops normally and achieves appropriate milestones up to the age of 4 and then begins to regress in both developmental and behavioral milestones and lose the skills they already learned. with a loss o skills plateauing around the age of 10.

Childhood Disintegrative Disorder is rare. It affects 1.7 in 100,000 and affects males at a higher rate than females. It is also known as Heller’s Syndrome and Disintegrative psychosis. The causes are unknown but may be linked to issues with the brain and nervous systems with some researchers suggesting it is some form of childhood dementia.

First discovered by Dr. Theodor Heller in 1908, Dr. Heller began publishing articles on his observation of children’s medical history in which he reported that in certain cases, children who were developing normally began to reverse at a certain age.

Signs and Symptoms

Children begin to show significant losses of earlier acquired skills in at least two of the following areas:

  • Lack of play
  • Loss of language or communication skills
  • Loss of social skills
  • Loss of bladder control
  • Lack of motor skills

The following characteristics also appear:

  • Social interaction
  • Communication
  • Repetitive interests or behaviors

Due to the small number of reported cases, it is included in the broad grouping of autism spectrum disorder in DSM-V under pervasive developmental disorder (PDD).  Although grouped with the autism spectrum disorder diagnosis, there are distinct differences. For example, children with CDD were more likely to be diagnosed with severe intellectual disability, epilepsy and long term impairment of behavior and cognitive functioning.

Resources

NCBI

Summit Medical Group

Neurodiversity in the workplace

Published by: JD SUPRA
Written by: Dentons

It is estimated that 15% of the UK population are neurodiverse. Many workplaces will already be accommodating neurodiverse employees but without the proper awareness and understanding of how best to support these employees

With Learning Disability Week taking place this month we have taken the opportunity to explore neurodiversity in the workplace and what employers should be doing. As a starting point, it is worth noting that ACAS has produced some very helpful guidance for employers, managers and employees.

What is neurodiversity?

Put concisely, people think differently. Neurodiversity is the way the brain processes and interprets information. One in seven people are neurodivergent, meaning that their brain processes information differently to most. Neurodivergence is experienced along a spectrum and has a range of characteristics which vary depending on the individual. There are various forms of neurodivergence but the most common are autism, dyslexia, dyspraxia and ADHD. While there tend to be certain expectations about the effects of each of these, they all cover a wide range of differences. Click here to read the rest of the story.

Law Enforcement and Autism: Why Training is Needed

Published by: Psychology Today
Written by: Katherine Stavropoulos

Although law enforcement is tasked with keeping the public safe, interactions between first responders and those with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or other psychiatric conditions can be contentious—and in some cases, deadly.

A 2012 study conducted by researchers at Drexel University measured how common it was for youth with ASD to be stopped and questioned by police or arrested. They found that by age 21, 20 percent of youth with ASD had been stopped by police, and almost 5 percent had been arrested.

Although the Drexel study focused on those in the U.S., similar findings have been reported from other countries. For example, a study from Swedish researchers found that people on the autism spectrum were at a 31 percent higher risk of having a criminal conviction compared to those without ASD. More broadly, in a study of all civilian deaths during interactions with law enforcement in 2015, researchers found that individuals with a mental illness were over 7 times more likely to be killed by law enforcement compared to those without. Click here to read the rest of the story

Autism And Fragile X Syndrome

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) about 1 in 54 children have been identified with autism spectrum disorder. ASD is reported to occur in all racial, ethnic and socioeconomic groups. ASD is more than 4 times more common among boys than girls. About 1 in 6 (17%) children aged 3-17 years were diagnosed with a developmental disability.

The CDC states that Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is the most common known cause of inherited intellectual disability and affects both males and females, with females having milder symptoms than males.

Autism is considered a common comorbid condition with Fragile X syndrome- it is estimated that he prevalence of ASD in Fragile X syndrome varies. some studies show a 50% relationship. While there are similar characteristics, the motivation appears to be for different reasons. For example, indiviuals with Fragile X Syndrome appear to avoid eye contact due to social anxiety and shyness while people with autism simply prefer to be left alone.

The following articles provide insightful information:

 

Autism Spectrum Disorder in Fragile X Syndrome– Further Inform Neurogenetic Disorders (FIND)

Autism Spectrum Disorder in Fragile X Syndrome Cooccurring Conditions and Current Treatment– Journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics

Fragile X and Autism Factsheet– Synapse

Fragile X is a common cause of autism and intellectual disabilities– UC Davis Health

Fragile X symptoms don’t add up to autism studies suggest– European Fragile X Network

Fragile X Syndrome and Autism– Interactive Autism Network

Fragile X Syndrome and Autism Spectrum Disorder- Otsimo

Fragile X Syndrome and Autism Spectrum Disorder: Similarities and Differences– National Fragile X Syndrome

The Fragile X Syndrome Autism Comorbidity: What do we really know? – National Institute of Health

What can we learn about Autism from studying Fragile X Syndrome?– Developmental Neuroscience

 

Printable Autism Fact Sheet

 

Today is World Autism Awareness Day. It is a recognized day sponsored through the United Nations to bring awareness about people with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

The day serves to bring individual autism organizations together around the world to aid in research diagnoses, treatment and acceptance. More than ever in these challenging times we face, tolerance, compassion and acceptance is needed to provide people with autism with necessary support.

The following fact sheet provides information on facts, prevalence, timeline, co-occurring disorders and the definition.

 

Download Fact Sheet Here

 

 

Teaching Counting to Special Needs Students

Teaching individuals to count is an early prerequisite to working on money skills. Before starting to work on a counting goals, students should be able to count numbers 1- 100. Make sure to break any counting activities into short, easy-to-manage steps and provide clear expectations.

6 methods for teaching money counting-Thought Co.

7 ways to teaching counting to 100- Raising Da Vinci

10 tips to teach numbers and alphabets to children with autism– The Learning App

Counting Strategies– National Council of Teachers of Mathematics

Easy way to teach preschool children to count– VeryWell

Math: Counting and Comparing– The Yale Center for Dyslexia and Creativity

Skip Counting for Autism– Autism Educators

Teaching Counting- The Autism Helper

Teaching Counting Skills– The Autism Helper

Teaching Counting– National Center on Intensive Intervention