16 Must-Read Training Resources In The U.K.

There are around 700,000 people on the autism spectrum in the U.K.- An estimated 1 in 100 people are affected. Studies also show that 60% of teachers in England do not feel they have adequate training to teach children with autism.

Thankfully across the U.K., a number of trainings that focus on autism help parents, professionals, caregivers and educators learn more about the autism spectrum disorder. below are links to trainings in the U.K.

England

Autism West Midlands
  • Autism West Midlands supports families and people with autism. Seminars and workshops are offered as well as an annual conference on autism.
Child Autism U.K.
  • Child Autism U.K. provides information and support for parents of children with autism. Training courses for parents includes beginner ABA and social skills.
The National Autistic Society- 
  • Leading U.K. charity for autistic children and their families. Provides information, support and services. NAS offers scheduled training events, in-house training and online training modules including training modules on communication, sensory experiences, stress and anxiety and physical activity.

Northern Ireland

Autism Initiatives
  • Provides a range of person-centered services throughout the U.K. Autism Initiatives Northern Ireland includes a learning and development department which is designed to meet the needs of all professional staff. Upcoming training topics for July includes, Understanding Autism, Epilepsy Awareness, and Keeping Children Safe. E-Learning courses are also available.
Autism NI
  • Northern Ireland’s longest-serving autism charity and training provider. Autism NI  provides family support workshops and discussion group. Training topics include, Fundamentals of Autism, Understanding Social Skills, Sensory Processing, and PECS training courses are held off-site.
Centre For Autism
  • Provides a wide range of training for professionals working with autistic children to parents, educators and caregivers. The organization also publishes a research bulletin designed to meet the needs of professionals working in education with autistic children. Trainings for parents include topics on, transition, sensory processing and life skills
PEAT
  • PEAT provides a wide range of training services for parents of children with autism and professionals involved with individuals with autism. PEAT provides in-house training and tailors made programs to meet the needs of parent groups and specific organizations.
The National Autistic Society, Northern Ireland
  • Provides information, support and training for autistic people, families, and professionals. Offers a variety of scheduled events, courses and online training modules.

Scotland

Autism Forth Valley
  • The Autism Forth Valley Website includes a table which contains information on training providers and courses including university courses on autism, professional organizations and social service agencies.
NHS Education for Scotland
  • NES offers a wide range of education and training support for both clinical and non-clinical staff in Scotland. Formats include e-learning, workbooks, publications and blended learning.
Scottish Autism
  • Provides a wide range of support services across Scotland for individuals with autism, their families and professionals. Scottish Autism offers external training core courses including, Introduction to Autism and Autism Profiling.

Wales

ASDinfoWales
  • An E-learning introductory course on autism spectrum disorder. Participants will be asked to answer a series of 20 questions. Once completed, participants will receive a certification.
Awares
  • Provides a library with a wealth of information on autism topics from previous conferences in Microsoft PowerPoint format. Geared towards professionals however this are also useful information for parents as well. Sample topics include; psychosexual development in ASD, A guide for practioners and resources for families living in Wales.
Learning Disability Wales
  • Training program includes a range of person-centered and practical courses for people in the public, voluntary and private sectors as well as parents and caregivers. Courses include a fee at an onsite facility. Training topics include, An Introduction to Mindfulness and Making Information Easy to Read and Understand
Ringway Training

A training provider delivering online courses on autism for professionals working with children, young people and adults on a host of topics including, Autism Spectrum Condition Advance Level Training and Autism and ADHD

The National Autistic Society/Wales
  • Offers a host of free one-hour webinars for teachers, professionals and parents. The website includes two series of one hour webinars on various topics such as, promoting inclusion, preventing bullying, and neurodevelopment and social competence in autism spectrum disorder.

May Special Needs Articles

Welcome to the May article links. These are articles that I tweeted and or received from viewers during the month of May on special needs and developmental disability topics. Enjoy!

5 things I learned from being an autism dad (Fatherly)

7 toilet training tips that help nonverbal kids with autism (Autism Speaks)

8 ingenious innovations helping autistic children communicate (Mashable)

9 important things autism moms want people to know (Autism Magazine)

10 steps to include students with autism in general education classrooms (Think Inclusive)

After an autism diagnosis: 13 necessary next steps for parents (Thinking Person’s Guide to Autism)

An overlooked resource- people with disabilities (Think Inclusive)

Author tells own story of life with cerebral palsy (Madison Magazine)

Autism: The hidden talent that shows up in the workplace (Business Standard)

Gaming may help kids with ADHD (The Newspaper)

How to help children with autism make, and keep friends (Chicago Tribune)

Kids treated for ADHD can still struggle in school, especially girls (Reuters)

The joys and challenges of being a parent with autism (The Atlantic)

Using visual schedules to get a child with autism organized in 45 minutes (Autismag)

What sensory processing disorder says about autism (Spectrum)

Talking About Autism, Listen To Families


Source: The Spectrum News
Author: Shannon Des Roches Rosa

I take a deep breath before reading any article, popular or scientific, about autism. I steel myself because most of these stories paint people like my curly-haired, autistic teenage son as burdens to their families — as changelings or enigmas. I love my son Leo fiercely and consider him none of those things, so these stories hurt. My adult autistic friends are even more pained than I am by these puzzlingly negative portrayals. Click here to read the rest of the story

March Special Needs Article Links

Welcome to the March article links. These are articles that I tweeted and or received from viewers during the month of March on special needs and developmental disability topics. Enjoy!

3 key lessons no one told about dyslexia (The Pavlovic Today)

7 key social skills to help children with autism cope with bullying (Upbility)

7 signs adult ADHD might be interfering with your performance at work (Techco)

7 tips for motivating kids on the autism spectrum (PopSugar)

11 signs of autism in girls (Very Well)

Helping Asperger’s teens transition to college (My Asperger’s Child)

Helping your ADHD child with homework (Healthy Place)

Is sensory processing disorder the same as sensory processing sensitivity? (The Highly Sensitive Person)

Organization and attention challenges related to sensory processing disorder (The O.T. Toolbox)

Parents: Don’t hide your children’s autism diagnoses from them (Thinking Person’s Guide to Autism)

Sensory processing disorder at home ideas (Kids Activities Blog)

Sleep strategies for kids with autism and sensory needs (And Next Comes L)

What an autistic shutdown is like for me (The Mighty)

What teachers should know about ADHD and ASD (Edutopia)

 

Resources Scarce for Adults With Autism


Source:(The Gazette)
Writer: Liz Zabel

Leah Parker wasn’t diagnosed with autism until she was 18.

Despite recognizing the symptoms in her behavior, the 19-year-old University of Iowa English major said her parents had trouble believing her.

Maybe it’s because she got “good at pretending and blending in” by studying others, even though it didn’t feel natural. Or perhaps it’s because her special interest in dogs is socially acceptable enough to “slip by without people noticing,” she said.

But when the doctors delivered the news that she is, in fact, autistic, her parents were shocked.

“A lot of people seem to think it’s much more rare than it actually is,” Parker said. “They have a picture in their head that everybody who is autistic is Rain Man or something People just know a lot more autistic people than they realize.” Click here to read the rest of the story

Autism and Managing Multi-Tasking and Memory


Source: (Huffington Post)
Writer: Mary Bailey

There are studies and articles that explore the mysteries of multi-tasking and memory in the life of individuals with autism, but there are still huge question marks which have yet to be answered. In my own search for the keys to Chase’s brain, I learned that researchers have discovered that the brains of children with autism are inflexible at rest-to-task performance. This basically means that specific brain connections do not change or function as they should, when switching from a resting-state to a task-state. There can also be impairments in the parts of the brain responsible for prospective memory (remembering things that need to be done in the future) and retrospective memory (remembering things that occurred in the past). Click here to read the rest of the story

Good Communication Can Make Medical Visits More Successful For Patients With Autism

Hospital, Doctor, Nurse, Medical, Health, Professional
Source: (News Medical)

Doctor visits can be a challenge for patients with autism, their families and health care providers. Kristin Sohl, associate professor of child health at the University of Missouri, offers several steps providers and families can take to make medical visits more successful. She says that all of them require good communication between the provider and parent before, during and after medical visits.

Before a Visit

“Parents or caregivers should call ahead to the provider’s office to discuss individual accommodations that the patient might need during the visit, such as a comfort item or a distraction toy,” Sohl said. “Tell the office staff if there have been prior negative experiences—or successful ones—so the office can provide a supportive environment and avoid triggering anxiety in the patient.” Click here to read the rest of the story.

For Those With Autism, Fixations Can Be Beneficial

Consuelo Martinez watches her daughter Chelsea, who has autism, play the violin
Source: (Disability Scoop)
Author: Shaun Heasley

Parents and teachers should do more to embrace the preferred interests of those with autism, researchers say, pointing out that such aptitudes can be calming and form the basis for careers.

Individuals on the spectrum often display intense interests in topics like computers, animals or trains. Traditionally, many experts thought that such preferences might inhibit social development. Click here to read the rest of the story.

Social Skills Resources for Parents and Special Education Teachers

For some autistic children, social situations can be overwhelming and cause a great amount of anxiety. One of the characteristics of having an autism spectrum disorder is social interaction. Dr. Lorna Wing described social interaction as:

  1. not paying attention to others
  2. being aloof, distant and uninterested
  3. being alone and withdrawal
  4. difficulty in making and sustaining relationships
  5. a lack of social skills

social-skills

Social skills vary from conversation to friendship skills. The following links provides social skills resources on a variety of topics:

5 tips for running a social skills group ages 7-11. This site provides tips on increasing social skills via working in a group.

12 activities to help your child with social skills. This article by the Friendship Circle describes 12 ways to help improve social skills

101 ways to teach children social skills. Written by Lawrence Shapiro, this ready-to-use reproducible activity book (pdf) contains information on communication, being part of a group, caring about yourself, and problem solving.

Building social skills through activities. Danny Pettry created an e-book that focuses on various activities that will increase social skills for children.

Kind words sensory lesson friendship activity. This article includes information on why kind word are important through sensory play.

More tools for teaching social skills in school. Examples of role-plays, worksheets and student behavior.

Social skills activities. Free printable activity sheets on developing and practicing social skills.

Social skills lesson activities. Developed by special educator Angela Cardenos, this website includes various lessons on social skills and friendship

Social skills lessons on friends. A lesson plan and activity on identifying the qualities of a friend and naming behaviors that a friend may exhibit.

Social Skills Worksheets. This site includes printables for social skills designed to develop appropriate social skills.

Should I Push My Activities Child To Take Part In Typical Activities?

Baseball kids
Source: Very Well
Author: Lisa Jo Rudy

You enroll your autistic in a preschool soccer program and watch as your child wanders off while the other children happily kick the ball and run toward the goal.

You carefully dress your child up for Halloween to look like his favorite TV character, only to find that he can’t stay in the costume for more than two minutes without having a sensory Meltdown. Click here for the rest of the story.