Eleven Ways You Can Make Your Autistic Child’s Life Easier


Published by: Thinking Person’s Guide To Autism
Written by: Shannon Des Roches Rosa

Loving your autistic child with all your heart is a wonderful, precious experience. If you’re not autistic yourself, though, even the purest love can’t always help you intuit how being autistic affects your child’s body, their senses, and how they interact with the world.

You don’t want to inadvertently make your child’s life harder than it has to be, so please consider the advice below—advice I’ve gleaned about autistic experiences, gathered during thirteen years of listening to autistic people, professionals, and parents. Some of these factors are common knowledge in autism communities and circles, but others are really not talked about enough, and every last one bears repeating. Click here for the rest of the story.

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Growing Up With Autism and ADHD, I Had To Adapt My Own Education


Published by: Ravishly

I had a dream about writing this. In my dream, I got an email from one of the Ravishly editors, someone who I’ve worked with before but who didn’t assign me this piece. The email popped up in my Gmail inbox, alerting me with a little bold (1) that I had to open and read it. The message was something to the effect of: “Hey Alaina! I see you didn’t turn in your piece to Jenni on time, which was due yesterday. We’re going to have to remove you from the schedule permanently, effective now.” Click here to read the rest of the story

Ten Seconds That Prove You Should Never Undersestimate A Non-Vebral Child


Published by: Faithmummy Blog

Speech and language therapists have all but given up on him, encouraging me to just accept he is non-verbal with limited understanding.
School take him on ‘environmental excursions’ rather than reading and writing because…well he can’t hold a pencil despite having been in school for four and a half years so he is never going to read and write is he?
The learning difficulties mental health team wrote to us explaining his challenging behaviour and long spells of screaming are just part of his complex diagnosis and are unlikely to change. Click here to read the rest of the story

Study of Nonverbal Autism Must Go Beyond Words, Says Expert


Source: Spectrum
Author: Sarah Deweedt

Roughly 25 percent of people with autism speak few or no words. A generation ago, that figure was closer to 50 percent. Most researchers agree that the decline is due to the recognition of more people with milder forms of autism, as well as to the advent of early intervention programs  that have helped more children. Click here for the rest of the story.

Autism Sensory Difficulties and How to Address Them

Autism Sensory Difficulties and How to Address Them

 

 

 

 

 

Source: Durham Region Autism Services

People with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) typically have difficulty processing sensory information such as sounds, sights, and smells. This is usually referred to as having issues with “sensory integration”, or having sensory sensitivity, and is caused by differences in how the brain of a person with ASD understands and prioritizes the sensory information picked up by the body’s many sensory receptors. When this breakdown in communication becomes too intense, the person with ASD may become overwhelmed, anxious, or even feel physical pain. When this occurs, some with ASD may act out. Click here to read the rest of the story.

Troubleshooting Common Problem Areas in Children with Autism

Troubleshooting Common Problem Areas in Children With Autism
Source: Durham Region Autism Services

When dealing with a child on spectrum, the presence of sudden or chronic behaviours that are aggressive, odd, or socially inappropriate can present challenges one may feel ill-equipped to understand and deal with. Being prepared ahead of time can help a great deal in managing these issues in the calm, logical way. The following questions and answers cover some of the most common problems that arise with the behaviour of children (and some adults) who have Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Click here for the rest of the story.

New State Laws Improve Coverage for Autism

New State Laws Improve Coverage for Autism
Source: PsychCentral
Author: Rick Nauert

A recent study finds that insurance coverage for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has improved significantly in most states. Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health discovered that over the past decade, the enactment of state laws mandating coverage of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has improved care for children, albeit with associated spending. Click here to read the rest of the story

July Special Needs Article Links

Welcome to the July article links. These are articles that I tweeted and or received from viewers during the month of July on special needs and developmental disability topics. A special thank you to Kathleen Carter for the additional special needs links!

5 things I would advise myself post autism diagnosis (HuffPost)

10 great autism books for autistic kids (New Horizon Professional ABA Services)

11 insightful tips for parents of ASD adults for getting the most out of vocational service providers (Think Inclusive)

17 things to love about ADHD (ADDitude)

ADHD and addiction- What is the risk (Discovery Place)

Creating the optimal living environment for a child with ADHD (Home Advisor)

How to create an autism friendly environment for kids (Redfin)

How to discuss puberty with your child who has special needs (Friendship Circle)

Make this summer safer with safety and wandering prevention resources (Autism Speaks)

My son made me a better teacher (ADDitude)

Parenting tips for ADHD: Do’s and don’t (Healthline)

Parents encourage early therapy for kids with cerebral palsy (Fox17)

Party planning and sensory processing disorder (Sensory Spectrum)

Secrets of your ADHD brain (ADDitude)

Seizures and seizure dogs (Epilepsy Foundation)

Strategies to triumphantly improve your autistic student’s peer interaction (Think Inclusive)

Teacher shortage leaves special education classrooms with inexperienced, first-time educators (Bakersfield.com)

Teens with ADHD: Recognizing signs of depression (Health Central)

The importance of self-esteem for kids with learning and attention issues (Understood)

The price of special education as autism rates surge (Bakerfield.com)

Understanding dyslexia (Child Mind Institute)

Autism and Wandering Resources (update)

Studies show that nearly half of children with autism attempt to wander off or bolt from a safe supervised place (Autism Speaks). Children with Angleman Syndrome also tend to have an obsession with water and will tend to wander if water is nearby. The following resources includes wandering kits, articles and additional resources on the topic of wandering.

What is Wandering?

When a person, who requires some level of supervision to be safe, leaves a supervised, safe space and/or the care of a responsible person and is expected to potential dangers such as traffic, open water (drowning), falling from a high place , hypothermia, heatstroke, dehydration.

Types of Wandering

  • Goal-Directed Wandering- wandering with the purpose of getting to something ( a place of obsession, water, etc.).
  • Non goal-directed wandering- Wandering with no purpose, random from one place to another.
  • Confusion Wandering-Wandering due to disorientation or confusion.
  • Bolting/fleeing- The act of suddenly running or bolding, usually to quickly get away from something, or in negative reaction to an event, anxiety or stress.
 Facts and Statistics
  • Roughly half, or 49%, of children with an ASD attempt to elope from a safe environment, a rate nearly four times higher than their unaffected siblings.
  • In 2009, 2010, and 2011, accidental drowning accounted for 91% total U.S. deaths reported in children with an ASD ages 14 and younger subsequent to wandering/elopement.
  • More than one third of ASD children who wander/elope are never or rarely able to communicate their name, address, or phone number.
  • 32% of parents reported a “close call” with a possible drowning.
  • 40% of parents had suffered sleep disruption due to fear of elopement.
  • half of families with elopers report they never received advice or guidance about elopement from a professional.
Source: Interactive Autism Network research report: Elopement and wandering (2011)
Source: National Autism Association, Lethal Outcomes in ASD Wandering (2012)

Caregivers Information

Autism elopement and wandering kit for families (Parenting Chaos)

Big Red Safety Toolkit (National Autism Association)

28 page toolkit that provides information on preventing wandering. The toolkit includes the following information:

  • Caregiver checklist
  • Family wandering emergency plan
  • swimming lessons tool
  • Root-causes scenario and strategies tool
  • Caregivers log
  • How to get tracking technology in your town.

First Responder Resources

First Responder Checklist– A checklist for first responders developed by the National Autism Association

First Responder Notification Form

First Responder Tips

GPS Tracking Technology

The AngleSense Guardian Kit

  • Comes with a GPS device, embedded SIM card, customized wearables and a magnet key for parents $39.00 monthly service plan.

7 tracking devices to find a lost child with autism (Friendship Circle)

Articles

5 simple ways to prevent wandering in children with autism (Autism Parenting Magazine)

Autism and Wandering (SFGate)

Autism and Wandering: How ABA can help keep kids safe. (HuffPost Parents)

Teaching safety skills to children with autism (Our Crazy Adventures in Autismland)

The autism epidemic that can no longer be ignored (HuffPost Parents)

Wandering: A hazard for more than a third of kids with autism (U.S. News)

Wandering & Autism: Elopement within the classroom (Autism Classroom Blog)

Wandering & Autism: Students who flee, bolt, run and elope (Autism Classroom Blog)

June Special Needs Article Links

Welcome to the June article links. These are articles that I tweeted and or received from viewers during the month of June on special needs and developmental disability topics. Enjoy!

8 activities for your preschooler with cerebral palsy (Cerebral Palsy News Today)

8 tips for wheelchair travel on an airplane (Cerebral Palsy News Today)

10 benefits of jigsaw puzzles for people with special needs (Autism Parenting Magazine)

20 tips on employment for students with disabilities( The Inclusion Lab)

25 sensory hacks for kids for vestibular and proprioceptive input (AndNextComesL)

At airports, making travel easier for autistic passengers (New York Times)

Epilepsy and Exercise (Epilepsy Foundation)

Helping your child with special needs develop empathy (Friendship Circle)

Kids with cerebral palsy take to yoga (The Times of India)

From tragic death, a law to safeguard people with developmental disabilities (Philly.com)

Let’s talk about the fidget spinner craze (Neurodivergent Rebel)

Parents of those with disabilities fear deportation (Disability Scoop)

Simple ways sensory-based intervention can change your ASD child’s life (Autism Parenting Magazine)

Sleep strategies for teens with autism: A guide for parents (Autism Speaks)

The difficulties that get overlooked when your autistic child is verbal (FaithMummy)

When a parent and child has ADHD (HuffPost)

When the brain can’t hear: Auditory Processing Disorder (Sensory Spectrum)