Six Things to STOP Saying to your (ADHD) Kids

Published by: Impact ADHD

Written by: Elaine Taylor Klaus

One of the most common questions I hear from parents – in coaching sessions, on training calls – is, “How do I say that so that my child will respond?” How do you give your kids directions without triggering a reaction? How do you get them to do their homework without starting a fight? You know the challenges – the list could go on all day.

While there is a lot of guidance Diane and I teach about how to communicate with our kids in a way that fosters connection and independence, sometimes we have to start by breaking old habits. It is every bit as important to pay attention to what we DON’T want to say to our kids, as it is to what we DO want to say. Click here to read the rest of the story.

The Most Supportive States for Raising a Child With Autism

Published by: Autism Parenting Magazine

Being a parent is challenging in its own right, and parenting a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) brings its own unique challenges. All parents want what’s best for their children, and it takes time, effort, and money to develop the whole child.

However, navigating systems of support for families in the US can be complex, to say the least. From deciding which daycare is best for your child and then finding a school that suits his/her needs, to securing a job with a salary that pays enough to support a family and also provides adequate healthcare, it is a real struggle for many parents in the US to make ends meet. Click here to read the rest of the article.

Teaching Strategies for Executive Function Disorder

According to CHADD org, Executive function skills refers to brain functions that activate, organize, integrate and manage other functions which enables individuals to account for short- and long term consequences of their actions and to plan for those results.

The following resources provides strategies on teaching students with executive function disorder skills:

10 tools to help teachers develop Executive Function classroom skills-The Edvocate

Activities Guide: Enhancing and practicing executive function skills with children from infancy to adolescence- Center on the Developing Child

Addressing Executive Function at the secondary level– Atlanta Public School

Executive Function in the classroom: Neurological Implications for Classroom Intervention– Reading Rockets

Executive Functioning Strategies for the Classroom– Pathway 2 Success

How to address executive function skills in the classroom-eschool news

Standard Interventions for Executive Functions– PDF Format

Teaching students with executive functioning issues– Resilient Educator

Treatment and strategies for weak executive function– Additude

What you should know about severe autism

Media is slowly getting better in it’s portrayal of people with autism in both movies and television, while many still hold onto to the perception of “Rain Man”, I do believe we are moving in the right direction. Still, little is discussed or talked about when it comes to children and adults with severe autism. Some may refer to severe autism as “low functioning when in fact autism is a spectrum in both symptoms and behaviors and varies from person to person.

Children and adults with severe autism often display the following signs :

  • Impaired social interaction
  • Difficulty in communicating- both expressive and receptive
  • Obsessive compulsive disorder
  • anxiety
  • aggressiveness
  • self-injurious

According to the 5th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), there are 3 levels of severity based on social communication impairments, restricted, and patterns of behaviors. The severity level (Level 3) is defined as requiring very substantial support. For example the person may exhibit very limited initiation of social interaction and extreme difficulty with coping and change. signs may include an indifference in others, using negative behavior to communicate, very little or echolalia, sensory sensitivity will vary from severe to none, may be self-injurious and have an intellectual disability.  Below you will find articles on understanding severe nonverbal autism:

5 nonverbal children that found their voices

Autism: How do you communicate with a non-verbal child

Helping nonverbal kids to communicate

I have nonverbal autism…Here is what I want you to know

Nonverbal autism: Symptoms and treatment activities

Missing brain wave may explain language problems in nonverbal autism

Overview of nonverbal autism

What can we learn from studying severe autism?

What makes severe autism so challenging?

Why being nonverbal doesn’t mean being non-capable

Why children with severe autism are overlooked?

Updated 8/23/2020

Signs and Symptoms of Dysgraphia

Early Signs of Dysgraphia

Signs and symptoms of dysgraphia generally begin to show up when children began to lean how to write. Early signs of Dysgraphia include:

  • Inconsistent spacing between letters
  • Poor spatial planning
  • Poor spelling
  • Unable to read own handwriting
  • Poor fine motor skills
  • Omitted words
  • Writes slow
  • Pain in hand from writing
  • Messy unorganized papers
  • Difficulty organizing thoughts on paper
  • Illegible printing and cursive letter formation
  • Slopping handwriting
  • Tight, cramped pencil grip
  • Tires quickly when writing
  • mixes upper and lower case or irregular sizes and shapes of letters.

Download a free dysgraphia checklist