Motor Development: How Autism Affects Motor Skills

Motor development
Website:Profectum
Written by: Serena Wieder

Moving our bodies throughout our day to day lives is something most of us do without giving it much thought — but it actually takes a considerable amount of skill.

The central nervous system controls both fine and gross motor skills. Fine motor skills include small movements, such as writing and drawing. Gross motor skills include larger movements such as walking and throwing a ball.

Motor development in autistic children has been the subject of study for years. The reason why is because autism is a neurological condition without any defining physical characteristics. Differences in brain functioning in autistic children are not easy to detect, so professionals will often observe behavioral patterns such as those exhibited by the development of motor skills.

Professionals also find it beneficial to observe motor development in autistic children because it can be measured over time, and results of testing can be easily reproduced. Observing motor skills can help professionals discover brain functioning differences, even in cases of high functioning autism. Click here to read the rest of the story

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How Anxiety Leads to Disruptive Behavior


Website: Child Mind Institute
Written by: Caroline Miller

A 10-year-old boy named James has an outburst in school. Upset by something a classmate says to him, he pushes the other boy, and a shoving-match ensues. When the teacher steps in to break it up, James goes ballistic, throwing papers and books around the classroom and bolting out of the room and down the hall. He is finally contained in the vice principal’s office, where staff members try to calm him down. Instead, he kicks the vice principal in a frenzied effort to escape. The staff calls 911, and James ends up in the Emergency Room. Click here for the rest of the story

The invisible girls on the Autism Spectrum — Everyday Autism

I recently helped a friend with her niece, who had just been diagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder. My friend strongly felt that this diagnosis was wrong, and after reading more about my symptoms and experiences with ASD believed that her niece “Anne” (name changed) was actually Autistic. The symptoms were all there – social issues, […]

via The invisible girls on the Autism Spectrum — Everyday Autism

Benefits of being an Autism Mum — Upside Mum

Firstly, the title is for effect. I’m not a big fan of the term ‘Autism Mum’ and only use it when it’s the only succinct way to describe what I’m talking about. I don’t mind other people using it, I just try not to use it myself. I’m just a mum. I have a child […]

via Benefits of being an Autism Mum — Upside Mum

# 3 This also can be called Disability discrimination — Don’t Dis their Ability

Hi everyone how is your day? For many of you, I know nobody want to admit he/she is discriminating people with disability, because some people did not realise that their behaviours can be called indirect discrimination; others who discriminate directly actually know it goes against and destroys the moral, which becomes a trend of weakness […]

via # 3 This also can be called Disability discrimination — Don’t Dis their Ability

FILM REVIEW: THE ACCOUNTANT — Grady P Brown – Author

I saw The Accountant starring Ben Affleck today and I must say that it is one of the most relatable films I have seen in recent years. The reason for this is because Ben Affleck plays someone who has high-functioning autism. As someone who has lived with autism all his life and serves as an […]

via FILM REVIEW: THE ACCOUNTANT — Grady P Brown – Author

Call for Submissions: Knots: An Undergraduate Journal of Disability Studies #3 — Disability Research Forum

Journal: Knots: An Undergraduate Journal of Disability Studies Submissions Due: 1st January 2017 Description: The Equity Studies program (at New College, University of Toronto) invites submissions for the next issue of Knots: An Undergraduate Journal of Disability Studies. Knots is a peer-reviewed journal that highlights high-calibre work by undergraduate students, and undergraduate alumni*, which moves […]

via Call for Submissions: Knots: An Undergraduate Journal of Disability Studies #3 — Disability Research Forum

Cause Cafe Gives Employees with Autism a Place to Call Home


Source: Today’s Parents

After Jonathan Barksdale lost his job as a bagger at Pathmark when the grocery store chain went bankrupt last November, he spent months getting rejected from a dozen other stores, one after another.

His mother, Dorina, remembered managers telling her the 25-year-old’s Asperger’s syndrome made him too risky to hire. Click here to read the rest of the story

 

Down Syndrome

Down Syndrome  is a chromosomal disorder caused by an extra cell division that results in an extra 21st chromosome. This causes developmental delays both intellectually and physically.

down-syndrome-resources

The disorder is named after John Langdon Down, a British physician who was the first to describe the syndrome in 1866. The disorder was later identified by Jerome LeJeune in 1959 as a condition associated by the chromosome structure. Down syndrome is the most common chromosome disorder. Each year, about 6,000 babies are born with Down syndrome. An estimate of 1 in 700 babies born. The life expectancy of people with Down syndrome increased between 1960 and 2007. In 1960, an average person with Down syndrome lived to be 10 years old compared to 2007 with people with Down syndrome living to 47 years of age.

Characteristics

Often, people born with Down syndrome may develop health issues and a cognitive development ranging from mild to severe. There is often a speech delay and children may lag behind with fine and gross motor skills. Physical characteristics may include a flat nasal bridge, single, deep creases across the center of the palm, protruding tongue, large space between the large and second toe, low muscle tone, almond shape to the eyes. Health issues may include, congenital heart defects, gastroesophageal reflux disease, sleep apnea and thyroid dysfunctions

Types

Trisomy

There is an extra copy of chromosome 21 in every cell. This is the most common form of Down syndrome. It represents 94% of all cases of Down syndrome.

Mosaicism

Mosaic Down Syndrome represents 2 to 4% of all cases of people with Down Syndrome. This occurs when a person has a certain percentage of translocation cells with the remaining cells unaffected. meaning people with mosaic down syndrome have a certain percentage of cells with the extra 21 chromosome. The physical characteristics of mosaic down syndrome vary from having similar characteristics of a person with down syndrome to almost none.

Translocation

It is caused by rearranged chromosome material that may be attached to the other 14 chromosomes. It can be cased by extra genes in the egg or sperm of one of the parents. About 3-5% of all cases are translocation.

Resources

Medical Sites

The following sites include information on causes, symptoms and definition:

CDC

Kids Health

Mayo Clinic

Medline Plus

WebMed

Wikipedia

Organizations
Band of Angels: http://www.bandofangels.com/-

Established in 1994, Band of Angels provides support for individuals with Down Syndrome and their families. The website offers links on Down Syndrome support groups and a litany of topics including, adoption, autism and education.

Down Syndrome International https://www.ds-int.org/

A U.K. based international organization comprising a membership of individuals and organizations from all over the world. Disseminates information on Down Syndrome including prenatal diagnosis, early intervention, education, medical, health, employment, aging and human rights. Down Syndrome International also promoted World Down Syndrome Day (March 21) as a day dedicated to people with Down Syndrome.

 

Global Down Syndrome http://www.globaldownsyndrome.org/

Provides fundraising, education and governmental advocacy for the Linda Crnic Institute for Down Syndrome. Resources available on the website include, information on research, medical care and facts on Down Syndrome.

International Down Syndrome Coalition: http://theidsc.org/

Dedicated to helping and advocating for individuals with Down syndrome from conception and throughout life. Offers support to parents who are new to the Down syndrome diagnosis by connecting parents to each other.

National Association for Down Syndrome http://www.nads.org/

NADS is the oldest organization in the United States serving individuals with Down syndrome and their families. Also provides families with information and resources that will enable them to access appropriate services and educates the public about Down syndrome.

National Down Syndrome Congress http://www.ndsccenter.org/

The purpose of the NDSC is to promote the interests of people with Down syndrome and their families through advocacy, public awareness, and information. When we empower individuals and families from all demographic backgrounds, we reshape the way people understand and experience Down syndrome.

National Down Syndrome Society http://www.ndss.org/

NDSS provides resources to new and expectant parents and offers a toll-free helpline and email services. NDSS also focuses on transitions , wellness and education

Top Books on Down Syndrome for Parents and Professionals

 

Down Syndrome Parenting 101

Babies with Down Syndrome: a New Parents Guide

Early Communication Skills for Children with Down Syndrome: A Guide for Parents and Professionals

Gifts: Mothers Reflect on How Children with Down Syndrome Enrich Their Lives

Gross Motor Skills for Children with Down Syndrome: A Guide for Parents and Professionals

Down Syndrome: An Overview- Kindle Edition

Adults with Down Syndrome

The Down Syndrome Handbook: A Practical Guide for Parents and Caregivers

Reflections From Holland: A New Mother’s Journey with Down Syndrome

The Down Syndrome Nutrition Handbook

Self-Care 12 Week Challenge (Week 6)

self.care.title

Week 6 Challenge- Drinking Water

Benefits of Drinking Water

  • Prevents constipation
  • Reduces risk of cancer
  • Prevent joint pains and arthritis
  • Helps in losing weight
  • Protects your heart
  • helps flush out toxins
  • Helps the body absorb nutrients
  • Lubricates skin and tissues
  • Reduces water retention

Articles on the benefits of drinking water:

6 reasons to drink water

7 science-based health benefits of drinking

10 Reasons why you should drink more water

12 unexpected reasons to drink more water

34 proven ways water makes you awesome

General Water Articles

Hydration Calculator

The amount of water you actually need to per day

Water: How much should you drink every day?