Autism in adults often accompanied by depression

Source: Spectrum
Written by: Hannah Furfaro

Depression is more than three times as common among adults with autism as it is in the general population, according to new work1. And those with average or above intelligence are more likely to be depressed than those with low intellectual ability.

The study found that about 20 percent of autistic people have a diagnosis of depression, compared with 6 percent of the general population.

The findings are based on data from a large Swedish cohort, but they are likely to apply more broadly. A large 2015 study in the United States likewise reported that 26 percent of people with autism have a depression diagnosis, compared with 10 percent in the general population2. A smaller study that same year estimated that 43 percent of autistic people have depression3. Click here to read the rest of the story

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Assistive Technology to Help Students with Developmental Delays Succeed Academically

Developmental delays can affect almost every area of a child’s life. This broad issue can cover any possible milestone that a child doesn’t meet according to the expected timeline, including speech or movement. While children with developmental delays can still be successful, it will require some additional help from patient teachers. Educators would do well to research the available assistive technology that can help to bolster a child’s education and encourage academic success.

What tools are available to help students compensate for their developmental delays? Here are just a few of the top technologies that parents and teachers have found to be successful in the classroom. Click here to read the rest of the story.

About High Sensitivity, Autism & Neurodivesity

Published by: The Highly Sensitive Person
By: Elaine

To be very clear, the brain research continues to find high sensitivity and autism quite different, but they also have something in common. High sensitivity and autism spectrum are terms that describe differences—differences in brains that make them not typical. The neurodiversity “movement” wonders why the majority of brain differences (not due to injury or infection) can’t be seen as simply variations in human experiences rather than some of them being disorders? A disorder means someone is impaired or suffering, and we have made it very clear that people are not impaired or suffering simply because of having a highly sensitive brain. Likewise, many of those on the autism spectrum (or diagnosed with ADHD) also feel they are wrongly viewed as having a disorder when in fact their particular trait (brain difference), even if unusual, can make important contributions to the world. They do not feel impaired or that they are suffering. They feel they are just different. Read the rest of the story here

Helping Your Autistic Child Work Through Their fear of Storms

Published by: Emaxhealth

Written By: Brooke Price

We all know that when summer approaches so do those summer storms. You know the ones with lightening, thunder and black outs. Many of us parents of Autistic and special needs children find that our children are especially scared of storms. Their fears overtake them and sometimes it becomes too much and they meltdown. Nothing is worse than a meltdown, at night, when you have candles lit, it is storming, and you have no power. Here are some great pointers for how to calm your child during the storm seasons, or really to help you work your Autistic child through any fear. Click here to read the rest of the story

Nike Turns To Runner With Cerebral Palsy To Help Design Next-Gen Shoe

Published by: Disability Scoop
Written by: Michelle Diament

One of the world’s largest athletic brands is expanding its lineup of shoes specially designed for people with disabilities.

Nike said this week that it will add a new product to its FlyEase collection — which features sneakers that include special accessibility features — this summer.

The Nike Air Zoom Pegasus 35 FlyEase was developed in consultation with Justin Gallegos, a member of the University of Oregon track club who has cerebral palsy, the company said. Click here to read the rest of the story

Autism Study Pairs Theatre With Peer Mentoring

Stage Curtain Theatre Theater Opera Stage
Published by: Tuscaloosa News
Written by: Ed Enoch

Researchers at the University of Alabama are preparing for a four-year study that pairs theater and peer mentoring to help improve social skills of adolescents with autism spectrum disorder.

“It is really good and healthy experience for the non-autistic peers to be a part of that,” said Susan White, principal investigator for the project at UA. “It is good on that side. It is really good for those kids who have autism to be part of something that is not just therapy.”

The heart of the theater exercise is helping adolescents with autism disorders pay attention and understand facial expressions and other nonverbal cues. Click here to read the rest of the story.

Motor Development: How Autism Affects Motor Skills

Motor development
Website:Profectum
Written by: Serena Wieder

Moving our bodies throughout our day to day lives is something most of us do without giving it much thought — but it actually takes a considerable amount of skill.

The central nervous system controls both fine and gross motor skills. Fine motor skills include small movements, such as writing and drawing. Gross motor skills include larger movements such as walking and throwing a ball.

Motor development in autistic children has been the subject of study for years. The reason why is because autism is a neurological condition without any defining physical characteristics. Differences in brain functioning in autistic children are not easy to detect, so professionals will often observe behavioral patterns such as those exhibited by the development of motor skills.

Professionals also find it beneficial to observe motor development in autistic children because it can be measured over time, and results of testing can be easily reproduced. Observing motor skills can help professionals discover brain functioning differences, even in cases of high functioning autism. Click here to read the rest of the story

How Anxiety Leads to Disruptive Behavior


Website: Child Mind Institute
Written by: Caroline Miller

A 10-year-old boy named James has an outburst in school. Upset by something a classmate says to him, he pushes the other boy, and a shoving-match ensues. When the teacher steps in to break it up, James goes ballistic, throwing papers and books around the classroom and bolting out of the room and down the hall. He is finally contained in the vice principal’s office, where staff members try to calm him down. Instead, he kicks the vice principal in a frenzied effort to escape. The staff calls 911, and James ends up in the Emergency Room. Click here for the rest of the story

The invisible girls on the Autism Spectrum — Everyday Autism

I recently helped a friend with her niece, who had just been diagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder. My friend strongly felt that this diagnosis was wrong, and after reading more about my symptoms and experiences with ASD believed that her niece “Anne” (name changed) was actually Autistic. The symptoms were all there – social issues, […]

via The invisible girls on the Autism Spectrum — Everyday Autism