Surge in Telemedicine One “Good” Outcome From COVID-19 Crisis, Doctors Say

Published By: Cerebral Palsy News Today
Written By: Grace Frank

While there are few silver linings to the cloud created by COVID-19, the pandemic that has killed tens of thousands, hobbled economies worldwide and drove millions to quarantine in their homes, one may be a new appreciation of telemedicine.

“If something good could come out of this crisis, it’s that we would learn how valuable telehealth could be to our community,” said Steven Shook, a neurologist at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio. Shook specializes in neuromuscular disorders such as Parkinson’s, muscular dystrophy, myasthenia gravis, spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), and amyloid lateral sclerosis (ALS), and in polyneuropathy. Click here to read the rest of the story

Store Receipt Activity

Download Here: Store Receipt Activity

This worksheet is a PDF document. You may save it to your computer or print it out for immediate use. Free for educational use at home or in classroom/day habilitation setting

Autism Researchers Adapt Studies For a Socially Distant World

Published by: Spectrum
Written by: Laura Dattaro

When the coronavirus pandemic first forced universities and labs to close, research teams raced to save their work and adjust to a socially distant world. Now, weeks into the crisis, many scientists are moving their investigations to virtual and online formats, a shift that may bring lasting changes to autism research.

Some researchers are adapting existing studies to the new realities. Others are initiating entirely new projects that can be conducted remotely, including some related to the pandemic.

Antonio Hardan’s team switched gears after closing a laboratory preschool that serves autistic children and suspending at-home therapy visits. Hardan, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Stanford University in California, seized the opportunity to launch a previously planned study. The study is intended to evaluate the effectiveness of remotely training parents to use a therapy called pivotal response treatment (PRT), which helps minimally verbal autistic children communicate1.

The team had been running a small uncontrolled trial on remote PRT for the previous two years. In August, Hardan and his collaborator, Grace Gengoux, received institutional review board approval to conduct a larger, controlled trial. Click here to read the rest of the story.

Shopping Activity: $15.00 Budget

Download Here:$15.00 Shopping Activity

This worksheet is a PDF document. You may save it to your computer or print it out for immediate use. This is free for educational use at home or in a classroom/day habilitation program.

UN Calls for Better Protection for Those with Disabilities During Pandemic

Published By: Disability Scoop
Written By: Michelle Diament

Governments should consider several steps to mitigate the impact of COVID-19 on people with disabilities, including removing individuals from institutions and granting testing priority, according to guidance from the United Nations.

In an 11-page document issued this week, the U.N. Human Rights Office said that countries and other stakeholders ought to do more to address the needs of people with disabilities who are being inordinately affected by the coronavirus pandemic.

“People with disabilities not only face greater risks from COVID-19, they also are disproportionately affected by response measures, including lockdowns. To address this double risk, we need to be engaging persons with disabilities in the COVID-19 response, and adapting plans to address their needs,” said U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet. Click here to read the rest of the story

National Barrier Awareness Day

National Barrier Awareness Day brings awareness to dissolving stigma’s that keep people with disabilities from advancing in education, barriers in physical access, bridging technology gaps and any type of barriers that prevent people with disabilities to reach their full potential. While there have been many achievements, financial, cultural education and physical barriers still exist.

The History of National Barrier Awareness Day

On May 7 1986, President Ronald Reagan signed Proclamation 5472 as National Barrier Awareness Day.  President Reagan stated that “Eighty percent of Americans will experience some disability in their lifetime that makes it necessary they must surmount and the contributions that they can make to our society.”

Ways to Remove Barriers

While there are still physical barriers that exists, there is very few information on the mental barriers, meaning people that still hold misconceptions, stereotypes and myths regarding individuals with disabilities. what do I mean by mental barriers?

  1. people that are unaware that most disabilities are invisible. Someone parking in a handicapped space might not have a physical disabilities, but could suffer from a debilitating pain. There are also people with cognitive disabilities including, AutismADHD, and Dyslexia.
  2. As professionals, myths, and misconceptions continue when we as professionals stop learning and growing. Disabilities change overtime and as professionals and educators it is important to always learn and grow. For examples, very little was known about autism 25 years ago and more so when it comes to co-occurring disorders such as sensory processing disorder (SPD) and Dysgraphia.
  3. It is time to see the abilities not the disabilities in the person. By focusing on the disabilities, we limit the growth and development which leads to self-confidence to those with disabilities.

Finally, we all have to take the role of advocates. It comes as part of the job. Sometimes it is advocating for both parent and child and using our voice to help others live quality lives.

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May Day Habilitation Activity Ideas

It is so unbelievable that we are already in May. Even more so that many States are still struggling with COVID19. As I write this, the news is reporting that in many States, lockdowns are easy up. Most programs that i know of are still closed. Here are some activities that can be done both in private homes as well as residential homes. Please continue to stay safe and healthy and continue to wash your hands (a lot)!

Download Here: May Habilitation Calendar