Fetal Alcohol Syndrome is preventable

Published by: Daily News
Written by: Kevin Green

FASD (Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Disorder) is a condition that results from alcohol exposure during the mother’s pregnancy. FASD causes brain damage and growth problems. The problems vary from child to child, but defects are not reversible.

The fetus can be affected regardless of the amount or frequency of alcohol consumed by the mother. Each year 630,000 babies with FASD are born globally. The average life expectancy of people with FASD is 34 years of age, with extreme causes accounting for 44% of all deaths. Not only will alcohol lead to various physical defects including brain malformation, but mental issues and neurological problems. FASD is 100% preventable.

Disabilities can vary from abnormal appearance, shorter height, hyperactivity, learning disabilities, poor judgment skills, vision and hearing problems, and problems with the heart, kidneys, and bones.

Distinctive facial features include small eyes, an exceptionally small upper lip, a short upturned nose, and a smooth skin surface between the nose and upper lip.

Drinking alcohol during pregnancy allows alcohol to enter the bloodstream and reaches the developing fetus by crossing the placenta. Alcohol causes higher blood alcohol concentrations in your developing baby than in the mother’s body because the fetus metabolizes the alcohol slower than an adult does. Alcohol interferes with the delivery of oxygen and optimum nutrition to your developing baby.

Exposure to alcohol before birth can harm the development of tissues and organs, causing permanent brain damage in your baby. Click here to read the rest of the story

HOW TO USE AN EARLY WARNING SYSTEM FOR SEPSIS IN THE EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT

Published by: Health Leaders
Written by: Christopher Cheney

A sepsis early warning system at a Cleveland-based health system triggered an alert in the electronic health record and a notification message to emergency department pharmacists.

An early warning system for sepsis embedded in an electronic health record (EHR) can have a significant impact on sepsis care, according to a recent research article.

Sepsis is a life-threatening condition caused by the body’s extreme reaction to an infection. Annually, at least 1.7 million American adults develop sepsis and about 270,000 Americans die due to sepsis, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The recent research article, which was published by Critical Care Medicine, describes the results of a randomized, controlled quality improvement initiative conducted at The MetroHealth System in Cleveland. The article features data collected from 598 patients, with 285 patients in the intervention group and 313 in the standard care group.

The intervention involved using a sepsis early warning system embedded in the health system’s EHR. The early warning system is based on structured EHR variables used to predict whether a patient will develop sepsis during their hospitalization. The variables include demographic data, Click here to read the rest of the article

Classroom Structuring Methods and Strategies for Children and Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders

Introduction

This articles provides a review of visually based strategies for organizing classrooms for children and youth with ASD using a review of the literature.

Findings

  • Environmental and visual structuring methods for use with individuals with ASD have been shown to have research support.
  • These methods have also been recommended by high functioning adults with ASD.
  • The methods have the potential for increasing independent functioning among students with ASD and decreasing the effects of challenges associated with ASD.

Reference

Ganz, J. (2007). Classroom Structuring Methods and Strategies for Children and Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders. Exceptionality. 15(4). 249-260.

Sickle Cell Disease Getting the Support it Needs.

Published by: Chicago Defender
Written by: Shera Strange

Sickle Cell Disease or Sickle Cell Anemia is not talked about as much as it was in the 60s, 70s, and 80s, however, the disease was discovered in America in 1910, over 110 years ago.  Sickle Cell Anemia is an inherited red blood cell disorder where there are not enough healthy red blood cells to carry oxygen throughout the body. The round red cells usually are flexible and can quickly move through the blood vessels. Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) can affect individuals of any ethnicity or race but is more common in African Americans in the U.S. compared to other ethnicities-occurring in approximately 1 in 364 African Americans.

In early Sickle Cell Disease awareness campaigns, The Black Panther Party took up the fight for health and opened free health clinics across the country. In addition, the Black Panther Party recognized that Sickle Cell Anemia was a neglected genetic disease because most of those affected were Black. The party set up a national screening program by running a rapid sickle cell screening program on a simple finger stick.

Access to high-quality health care is a significant challenge in the Sickle Cell Disease community, exacerbated by the impact of COVID-19 and longstanding healthcare disparities.

A local organization received a grant to support those in Chicago’s underserved communities with Sickle Cell Disease. The Sick Cells organization was named a distinguished grantee of the Global Blood Therapeutics (GBT) 2021 Access to Excellent Care for Sickle Cell Patients (ACCEL) Grant Program. Global Blood Therapeutics is a biotech company dedicated to discovering, developing, and delivering life-changing treatments for people living with dire blood disorders, such as Sickle Cell Disease. Established in 2019, the ACCEL Grant Program supports community-based organizations and institutions in accelerating the development of sustainable access-to-care programs. In 2020, the grants focused on the transition of care from pediatrics to adult purpose care. As a result, individuals with Sickle Cell Disease did not have the opportunity to connect with a program in the adult setting the same way they have in the pediatrics setting. Click here to read the rest of the story

Stopping dementia in Down syndrome patients

Published by: Medical X Press
Written by: Kyoto University

Down syndrome is mostly known for the learning disabilities it causes, but patients typically suffer from a wide number of ailments. One is the early onset of Alzheimer’s disease. Using iPS cells from Down syndrome patients, a new study by CiRA researchers suggests that the molecular signs of Alzheimer’s disease result from higher oxidative stress in neurons and that antioxidants could have therapeutic effects.

Healthy individuals have 23 pairs of chromosomes, with one chromosome in each pair inherited from the mother and the other from the father. Down yndrome is caused by trisomy 21, in which chromosome 21 has three copies instead of the normal two. Among the many genes in this chromosome is amyloid precursor protein, or APP. The APP protein is a precursor of beta-amyloid, which makes up the plaques that are commonly seen in the brains of Alzheimer’s disease patients.

“The extra copy of the gene increases the expression of APP and the subsequent production of beta-amyloid, and many Down syndrome patients with cognitive impairment show high levels of beta-amyloid plaques,” explains CiRA Associate Professor Megumu Saito, who led the study. Click here to read the rest of the story