Developmental Disability Awareness Ribbons

Awareness ribbons inn recent history began when Penney Laingen used the ribbon ass a symbol of vigilance ( from the song, Tie a Ribbon Around the Ole Oak Tree) when she tied a yellow ribbon around the oak tree in her front yard when her husband, Bruce Laingen. a top-ranking U.S. diplomat was a hostage during the Iran hostage crisis in 1979. This was followed by the red ribbon during the AIDS epidemic and the pink ribbon bringing awareness to breast cancer.

Ribbons have long been used as a way to bring awareness and raise consciousness for a cause. Ribbons and disability awareness has evolved from brining awareness to various disability topics such as sensitivity, core information, inclusion and advocacy to including information in various formats including resources, activities and print information. People are using social media as a means to promote awareness including using hashtags and setting up Facebook pages specifically for disability awareness.

The Ribbons below in staying consistent with the Special Needs Resource Blog, focus on ribbons that bring awareness to developmental disability and special needs issues. Awareness is only a part of educating and training people on disability awareness. Any training activities should also include acceptance.

Awareness Ribbons

Autism Spectrum Disorder- The Autism ribbon continues to evolve overtime. The puzzle piece was first used in 1963 by a parent and board member of the National Autistic Society in London indicating the puzzling, confusing nature of autism. In 1999, the puzzle piece ribbon   was adopted as the universal sign of autism awareness by the Autism Society reflecting the complexity of the autism spectrum. Overtime, the both the puzzle and ribbon have become a symbol for seeing autism as something that is puzzling an needs to be fixed rather than acceptance. A more positive symbol includes the infinity loop used as a symbol for acceptance rather than awareness.

 

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

Epilepsy

Cerebral Palsy

Down Syndrome

Purple Awareness Ribbon

epilepsy ribbon

Down Syndrome

down syndrome ribbon

Down Syndrome

Lime Green Ribbon

lime awarenss ribbon

Muscular Dystrophy 

Spinal Cord Injuries

Orange Awareness Ribbon

adhd.ribbon

ADHD

Multiple Sclerosis,

Sensory Processing DisorderRett Syndrome

Blue Awareness Ribbon

hydrapany.ribbon

Apraxia,

Cri Du Chat,

Hydrocephalus

Light Blue Awareness Ribbon

Trisomy 18,

DiGeorge Syndrome

 Observance  Awareness Months

February

Turner Syndrome Awareness

March

 Trisomy18

Kidney Awareness

Multiple Sclerosis

Cerebral Palsy

Developmental Disabilities

April

Autism

Auditory Processing Disorder

May

Apraxia

Cri Du Chat

Cystic Fibrosis

Williams Syndrome

June

Dravet Syndrome Day

July

Fragile X Syndrome

National Craniofacial Awareness and Prevention Month

September

Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Day

Hydrocephalus

Sickle Cell Anemia

Spinal Cord Injuries

October

ADD/ADHD

Down Syndrome

Rett Syndrome

Sensory Processing Disorder

November

DiGeorge Syndrome

Epilepsy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

September Special Needs Resource Article Links

article link header

Welcome to the September Article Links. These are articles that I have tweeted during the month of September. I tweet articles and links everyday. Please make sure you follow me and I will follow you back!

  1. Girls and boys with autism differ in behavior, brain structure
  2. What about mom? Reducing stress in mothers of children with autism.
  3. 8-year-old with cerebral palsy is launching a modeling career
  4. 10 must have products for individuals with cerebral palsy
  5. What every parent should know about an IEP and a 504 plan
  6. Greatest risk for cerebral palsy occur before birth
  7. Adults with sensory processing disorder, you are not alone
  8. The Forgotten history of autism
  9. 47 hacks people with ADD/ADHD use to stay on track
  10. Top four things you need to know when hiring people with disabilities
  11. Create a better classroom for kids with autism
  12. I’m a special education teacher. Here is what I want parents to know
  13. Autism: The number 1 thing you can do to help your child
  14. Living with an invisible disability
  15. Top 10 trends in special education