International Dravet Syndrome Awareness Month

Date: June 23, 2022

Epilepsy is the 4th most common neurological disorder in the United States. With children, around 400,000 have epilepsy and most are able to control their seizures and lead normal lives. Dravet Syndrome is a rare form, of epilepsy found in children. Symptoms include, developmental delays, sleeping conditions, and chronic infections. Here are 20 facts you shoud know about Davet Syndrome.

20facts.dravet

click here for a printed copy

  • Charlotte Dravet first described severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy in France, 1978.
  • The name was later changed in 1989.
  • It is also called Severe Myoclonic Epilepsy of Infancy (SMEI)
  • It is a rare genetic disorder affecting 1 in every 20,000-40,000 children
  • It appears during the first year of life.
  • Developmental disabilities and abnormal EEG’s are often not evident until the second of third year of life.
  • Seizures are often fever-related.
  • It is rare to develop beyond the age of 5.
  • Children often experience poor development of language and motor skills
  • Is caused by defects in a gene in 79% of cases.
  • Affects 2-5% of children in North America
  • It is induced by prolonged exposure to warm weather
  • It is associated with sleep disorder including insomnia
  • Seizures are frequently resistant to treatment
  • There is a higher risk of Sudden Unexplained Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP) (15-20%)
  • The onset of signs and symptoms is around 6 months old
  • Children diagnosed with Dravet Syndrome have a 85% chance of survival.
  • Development is typically normal.
  • Episodes may be frequent and prolonged

To learn more, Download a free factsheet here:

ADHD and Dyscalculia

Studies suggests that between 4-7% of students have experience difficulty in math compared to 26% of children with ADHD. Here is a free download which provides resources and information on ADHD and Dyscalculia

ADHD, autism and dyslexia: How companies can help neurodiverse job applicants

Published by: nzherald.conz
Written by: Katie Harris

Neurodiverse Kiwis contribute significant value to the workforce, but structural problems within the interview process mean many can be locked out of the job market. Katie Harris speaks to those on the ground about how to improve interviews for neurodiverse Kiwis.

“Tell me what you’re most proud of?”

For some, this may seem like a simple question to answer, but for many neurodiverse Kiwis its vagueness can throw off even the most well-prepped applicant.

Neurodiversity encompasses neurological differences including dyslexia, autism spectrum disorder (ASD), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), dyspraxia, dyscalculia, dysgraphia and Tourette’s syndrome.

The neurodiverse can bring a wealth of creativity, hyperfocus and out-of-the-box thinking that many organisations need, but often interviews can pose as a barrier to success for some.

Autism NZ chief executive Dane Dougan told the Herald the whole recruitment process isn’t set up for neurodiverse people.

Autism NZ employment facilitator Megan McNeice told the Herald a big roadblock for the neurodiverse in interviews is open-ended questions. Click here to read the rest of the story.

Is ADHD linked to substance abuse? There’s strong connection between them, study finds

Published by: The Herald Sun
Written by: Karina Muzhukhina

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may be linked to substance abuse, a new study found.

The study, set to be published in the journal Alcohol and Alcoholism, found that even when accounting for age, race, income, education, childhood adversities and mental illnesses aside from ADHD, people aged 20 to 39 and diagnosed with ADHD were 69% more likely to have a substance use disorder than those without ADHD.

Around half of people with ADHD will have a substance abuse disorder, the study found, compared to only about 23.6% of adults without ADHD.

Researchers collected data from the Canadian Community Health Survey-Mental Health and analyzed findings from 270 people between the ages of 20 to 39 with ADHD and 6,602 people without the disorder.

About 36% of adults with ADHD reported abusing alcohol, followed by cannabis — with about 23% of adults with ADHD abusing the substance. Those with ADHD “were also three times more likely to experience an illicit drug disorder” — not counting marijuana — compared to those without the disorder. Click here to read the rest of the story.

Prader Willi Syndrome Factsheet Download

Prader Willi is a syndrome which involves chromes

 

Download the information here;