EPIPEN

epipen

The EpiPen’s sudden price increase has received an onslaught of media coverage leading to a congressional hearing held yesterday. Currently, 43 million people are at risk for experiencing a life-threatening allergic reaction  concerning the spike in cost of the EpiPen over the years since 2004:

2004- $106.32
2005- $106.96
2006- $107.76
2007- $108.96
2008- $110.18
2009- $116.01
2010- $150.76
2011- $176.50
2012- $208.84
2013- $273.24
2014- $354.94
2015- $468.06
2016- $608.61

An EpiPen (short for Epinephrine) is often used in life-threatening emergencies to treat allergic reactions to insect stings such as bees, yellow jackets and hornets. When a person is stung by an insect, the normal reaction includes swelling and redness around the site. There are those however that experience an allergic reaction, also know as an anaphylactic reaction. Other serious allergic reactions may include foods such as eggs, milk, peanuts, shellfish and wheat. The symptoms of a severe allergic reaction include: trouble breathing, a rash, difficulty swallowing. dizziness, heart palpitations and  chest discomfort.

EpiPens are pre-filled and delivers medication into the muscle of the outer thigh. The injection reduces swelling of the throat and face, stimulates the heart and raises the blood pressure. Anyone that uses the auto injector, should still be checked out by a health care specialist.

First Week Activities in Special Education

Source: Breezy Special Ed

How do you start the first week in a special education class? I’ve been asked this question a lot lately, and understandably why! I think every teacher, no matter how long they have been teaching, has some sort of nightmares or sleepless nights about the first day/weeks (am I right?!). Click here for the rest of the article

Why Autistics Emotions May Go Unrecognized

Young boy looking at his mother

Source: VeryWell

Anyone who knows someone with autism knows that — of course! — people with autism have feelings. Sometimes very strong feelings. Just like everyone else. People with autism can be happy, sad, excited, depressed, frustrated, or angry.But…The myth that “people with autism are emotionless” persists Why? There are a few reasons; some good and some — pretty silly.  For example: Read the rest of the story here.

National Conference on Special Needs Trusts

ST. PETERSBURG BEACH, FLORIDA: 2010 Special Needs Trust Conference presented by the Stetson University College of Law at the Don Cesar. Photos by Matt May/Stetson College of Law

On October 19-21, 2016, the National Conference on Special Needs Trusts and Special Needs Planning will present a conference on Special Needs Trusts. A Pre-conference will be held, October 19, 2016 on tax issues in special needs planning.

The conference will be held:
The Vinoy Renaissance St. Petersburg Resort and Golf Club
St. Petersburg, Florida

You can learn more about the conference here

Letter to Toni Braxton Regarding Diezel’s Autism Status — The Liberal Aspie

Anonymously Autistic

Autism is NOT a disease that can be cure it is a way of thinking and experiencing the world. One does not simply git rid of Sensory Processing Disorder or change the wiring of their brains.

It is mentally damaging to make Aspies learn to blend in like neurotypical kids because it implies that they way they were born was not good enough.

WHY can’t he just be a wonderful Autistic boy? Why does he have to be “normal”. Poor kid is going to have self esteem issues in the future.

Dear Toni Braxton, Recently, you have announced in an interview with Access Hollywood that your youngest son, Diezel, “is no longer autistic,” giving credit to Suzanne Wright–in light of her death from pancreatic cancer–for his ability to “overcome his diagnosis.” I’m sorry to have to say this as a fan of your music, but… [. . .]

To say…

View original post 152 more words

Home Schooling Your Special Needs Child

Since the early 1900’s, home schooling children in the United States has continue to grow in leaps and bounds. Many parents have decided to educate their children at home for many reasons including protecting their children from bullies, concerned with the academic instruction, the ability to give their special needs child one on one attention and having control over their child’s education.

home_schooling.2

Currently, 5% of children being home schooled have special needs. The are a number of resources available to provide parents with support:

Homeschooling a Struggling Learner– provides regulations for each state. The rules vary for each state. A few States require that local officials are notified on the intend of home schooling your child, while other may require assessment test.

The following sites provide law information:

Assessment and Intervention

Home School Notification Quick Facts

Homeschool Options

Instruction Time and Subject Requirements

Parent Qualifications Quick Facts

Record Keeping

Special Needs

The following are articles on home school and special needs

Homeschooling Special Needs

Special needs child thrives by homeschooling

Resources

HSLDA– Non-profit advocacy organization established to defend the right of parents.

 

 

August Special Needs Article Links

specialneedslinks

Welcome to the August links. These are articles that I tweeted and or received from viewers during the month of August on special needs and developmental disability topics. Enjoy!

5 ways to help your child with autism be more spontaneous (The Suburban)

9 things people with autism want bullies to know (Autism Speaks)

Avonte settlement won’t heal the pain (Queens Gazette)

Care for Children with epilepsy should be aware of accompany disorders (Epilepsy Research UK)

Children with autism may benefit from weighted backpacks at school (Consumer Affairs)

Finally ADHD is recognized as a disability (West)

Florida Tech program to teach police about autism (WFTV9)

Helping students with autism make the back-to-school transition (Autism Speaks)

How to tell a skeptical souse your child has a sensory processing disorder (Integrated Learning Strategies)

Resources for creating sensory-diets (Growing Hands on Kids)

This non-speaking teenager wrote an incredibly profound letter explaining autism (The Sydney Morning Herald)

Tips for flying with children with autism (Autism Cruises)

Understanding the history and pervasive myths around autism (Mind/Shift)

What are the signs of sensory processing disorder? (The Sensory Spectrum)

Why we are proud to have autism (Independent)

Call for Papers- American Association of Behavioral and Social Sciences (AABSS)

aabs call for papers

The American Association of Behavioral and Social Sciences (AABSS) will be holding its 20th annual conference in Las Vegas, NV. January 30-31, 2017. Deadline for proposal submission is November 19, 2016 All presented papers are eligible for submission to the Journal of Behavioral and Social Sciences. (JBSS) For further information, click the following:

Submit a proposal that includes a title, an abstract of not more than 150 words, and a summary that does not exceed more than 600 words.  If the proposal is accepted for presentation, then the title and abstract will be included in the conference program.

All presented papers are eligible for submission to the Journal of Behavioral and Social Sciences (JBSS), and all submitted papers will be peer-reviewed for potential publication.

 

Special Needs Expo

specialneeds.expo_nj

If you are in the New Jersey area, The Special Needs Expos will be hosting an event in New Jersey on September 18th, 2016 from 11:00am to 4:00pm. The expo will be held at Teaneck Marriott at Glenpointe.

The free event is geared towards delivering information to parents, caregivers, professionals and children. Resources and information include special needs schools, camps, recreational sports, respite programs and social service groups. Additional exhibitors include non-profit organizations, special needs trust information and non-traditional therapist.

For further information, click here

5 Great TED Talks on Autism

autism.ted

Steve Silberman: The Forgotten History of Autism

Science journalist describes the history of autism through the work of Hans Asperger and explores neurodiversity and the link between autism and genius.

Chris Varney: How My Unstoppable Mother Proved the Experts Wrong

An advocate for children rights, Chris Varney, diagnosed with autism as a child explains how his mother and a community of support, instilled the importance of believing he can do anything.

Rosie King: How Autism Freed Me To Be Myself

In her TED Talk, Rosie shares the importance of being able to step outside the box, and questions why brilliant people strive to be “normal.”

Benjamin Tarasewicz: Breaking Barriers of Autism: The Power of Kindness and Friendship

A high-schooler and musician diagnosed with autism, Benjamin provides inspirational stories and tips for reaching out to people with differences.

Temple Gradin: The World Needs All Kinds of Minds

An expert on animal behavior, Temple Grandin has designed humane handling systems for half the cattle-processing facilities in the U.S., discusses the different types of thinking across the spectrum.