PARENTS SHARE HOW HAVING SIBLINGS WITH AUTISM MAKES THEM BETTER PEOPLE

Published by: Our Crazy Adventure in Autismland
Written by: Teresa Cooper

Ever wondered whether to have a second or third child after having a child diagnosed with autism? It can be difficult to think about it when you have the challenges in front of you, but many parents have had other children and found out just how rewarding it is to have siblings for children with autism. Here are some of the thoughts they’ve shared on the topic. Click here to read the rest of the story.

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Mom Invents Seatbelt Cover That Alerts Emergency Services To Medical Conditions

Published by: The Autism Site

When I was a teenager arguing with my mom about curfew, she said, “Of course I’m always going to worry. I’m your mother, it’s my job.”

Moms can be real-life superheroes sometimes, but they’re human, too. They worry, they plan ahead, and they do what they can to keep us safe while knowing full well that scary and dangerous situations still may find us anyway.

For children with special needs or medical conditions, that worry takes on a sharper edge. Click here to read the rest of the story.

Experts Warn Against Use of the Term “High-Functioning” to Describe People with Autism

Published by: The Autism Site
Written by: Elizabeth Nelson

If you’ve been in the autism community for long, you’ve surely heard the term “high-functioning” applied to people on the autism spectrum who don’t also have an intellectual disability or don’t require much extra assistance navigating the world. It’s common to hear this phrasing not only in everyday life but also in higher-quality resources like medical journals. But many people have already identified problems with the common use of the term “high-functioning,” and recent research further reiterates why the word shouldn’t be used. Click here to read the rest of the story.

The Meaning of a Meltdown

Published by: Someone’s Mum Blog

To most parents, the words tantrum and meltdown are interchangeable – a way to describe a frustrated and uncontrollable child – the name for those moments when strangers stare and you wish you could shrink into yourself. Every parent knows them.

To the parents of autistic children, and parents of children with sensory processing issues, those words will always mean very different things.

It is hard to make others understand. The difference between those two words is central to my life. I wish I could explain; I wish I could show you…

But a child in meltdown is confidential. I cannot show my gorgeous boy in full meltdown mode because it is, should be, taboo. It lays him bare, at his most vulnerable. He is pure emotion, pure anguish. There are no photos, no record of our bleakest times but these words.

There are those who will witness such moments; they will see. But they will not KNOW. No one, not even his grandparents, cousins, aunts, uncles – the hundreds of people who love him – they do not KNOW.

I can give you the definitions – Click here to read the rest of the story

CDKL5 and Teaching Strategies

CDKL5 is a neurodevelopmental disorder that includes signs of early-onset epilepsy. In fact 90% of children diagnosed with CDKL5 disorder are more likely to develop epilepsy. CDKL5 is derived from a gene and one of the most common causes of genetic epilepsy. Children diagnosed with CDKL5 also face many other developmental challenges as well.

Image by PublicDomainPictures from Pixabay

Facts

It is a neurodevelopment disease caused by the CDKL5 gene.

It impacts cognitive, motor, speech and visual function

It affects 1 in 40,000-60,000 children each year.

CDKL5 was previously called STK9

The disorder mainly affects females

The cause of CDKL5 deficiency disorder is unknown

Signs of CDKL5 deficiency includes epileptic seizures

Starting within hours of birth to 2 years of life, some children often go for 24 hours or more without sleeping.

Signs and Symptoms of CDKL5
Teaching Strategies

The following are teaching strategies that can used when teaching children with the CDKL5 disorder:

  • Provide frequent breaks
  • Use assistive technology
  • Provide extra time
  • Repeat directions
  • Use concrete items when possible
  • Break task into smaller steps
  • Teach in sequence
  • Use a multisensory approach
  • Use hand-on material

 

Children's Hospital.org
Genetic Home Reference
International Foundation for CDKL5 Research
Rare Diseases.org

 

 

DIY Sensory Activities for your Child With Autism

Dysfunctional sensory system is a common Symptom of Autism as well as other developmental disabilities. In this, sometimes one or more senses can either be hypo or hyper sensitive to stimulation and can lead to behaviors like rocking, spinning, and hand- flapping, irritability and hyperactivity.

There are three basic senses that are critical for our survival- tactile, vestibular, and proprioceptive. Sensory Integration techniques or therapies of these senses can facilitate attention and awareness, and reduce overall arousal.

In this article, each of these sensory systems will be covered. There also will be a Do-it-yourself (DIY) activity mentioned to overcome dysfunction and improve functioning of these sensory systems. Click here to read the rest of the story.

Sensory Eating is not Picky Eating

Published by: Speaking of Autism

I want you to imagine that you are a kid once again, maybe ten or eleven years old. You are sitting down in the evening with your family for dinner. The table is set, and your parents bring out what will be tonight’s entree: a cut of cold, raw chicken breast. It’s slimy pink mass slides onto the plate in front of you, and soon after your whole family is chowing down on the raw cuts of meat. You can’t stand to even watch anyone else eat the raw chicken, let alone fathom yourself choking it down. Yet, despite the very real disgust and aversion you feel towards the raw chicken breast, somehow it’s you who are strange for not wanting to eat it. Maybe you’re called “picky” or told that you simply need to and just learn to enjoy raw chicken like everyone else. Maybe you go hungry every night at dinner because the only thing being served are items as aversive as the cuts of raw chicken. Click here to read the rest of the story.

Fine Motor-Flag Day Activities

June 14th is the designated day to celebrate the American flag. The purpose of Flag Day is to reflect on the foundations of the Nation’s freedom. The following activities can be used to improve fine motor skills for both children and adults with disabilities. From cutting to coloring , the activities also use a multi-sensory approach to learning.

Arts and Crafts

DLTK Flag Day– Flag day crafts including coloring pages and tracing.

Education World– Flag day lesson plan activities

Enchanted Learning– Allows you to click on any of the crafts to get to the instructions.

Flag Day Crafts– Includes creating a togetherness flag, star cookie cutter and a craft stick American Flag

No Time for Flash Cards- Create an American flag sticky window collage

Flag Day Inspired Recipes

Food Network– 6 Star spangled red, white, and blue recipes made for flag day.

Saralee Bread- Flag day food art recipe

Taste of Home- Top 12 flag-shaped recipes

Tasty Kitchen– Recipe for cakes and cupcakes in the shape of the American flag.

Flag Day Coloring

Color me good

Crayola

DLTK

Doodle Art Alley

Get Coloring Pages

Supercoloring

The color.com

Thoughtco

USA Printables

Woojr.

How Autism And Visual Perception Affect Train Travel

Train operator GWR is now working for their second year in providing bespoke autism awareness raising sessions for their front line staff, allowing them to be better prepared to help people living with the condition use public transport.

Looking to provide the best possible experience for all passengers, GWR is working in collaboration for a second year with UK Autism charity Anna Kennedy Online increasing autism awareness to help its staff improve in meeting the needs of those travelling with autism.

For many with an Autism spectrum condition, some of the more commonly experienced issues is increased anxiety and sometimes overwhelming sensory processing information as well as the need for structure and reassurance. Click here to read the rest of the story.

Free Printable Money WorkSheets

Summer will be here before you know it. If you want your student/ child or individual to continue practicing math skills, I have provided below 4 money sheets that you can printout and make several copies. The money sheets allows the child to work on both IEP and ISP goals including:

  1. Identifying coins
  2. Matching coins
  3. Visual discrimination
  4. Counting
  5. Transition skills
  6. Visual learners

 

Burger King.Worksheet. This is a fun activity especially for children, students and adults that enjoy going to Burger King. The individual will choose the picture and subject the cost of the item from $10.00.  This activity people with dysgraphia, increase money skills, attention skills, task initiation skills and works well as a pre-trip to Burger King. focusing on transition skills.

Matching Dimes Worksheet– The matching dime activity is great for goals on counting and identifying a time. it is useful for children adults that are visual learners and provides hands on materials. The students learning ability will increase with the use of actual dimes.

Circle Nickle Worksheet – This worksheet give the individual an opportunity to work on counting, identify various coins as well as explaining the value of the coin. The worksheet also provides additional support and increases visual discrimination skills.

Dime Counting – helps the child, student or adult with special needs practice counting skills and visual memory.

My plan for the rest of the year is to provide you with more resources that are more functional and allows you to download information.