Assistive Technology to Help Students with Developmental Delays Succeed Academically

Developmental delays can affect almost every area of a child’s life. This broad issue can cover any possible milestone that a child doesn’t meet according to the expected timeline, including speech or movement. While children with developmental delays can still be successful, it will require some additional help from patient teachers. Educators would do well to research the available assistive technology that can help to bolster a child’s education and encourage academic success.

What tools are available to help students compensate for their developmental delays? Here are just a few of the top technologies that parents and teachers have found to be successful in the classroom. Click here to read the rest of the story.

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Teaching Telling Time To Special Needs Children and Adults

Teaching children and adults with disabilities to tell time is one of the many steps towards independence. While neurotypical children tend to start learning how to tell around the first grade, for children with disabilities, it may take a little longer.

When teaching a child with a disability to learn how to read, teaching time telling skills requires more practice a most. each step should be broken Use multi-sensory activities as much as you can including practices that involve tactile, visual, touch, etc. Be aware if the child has a sensory processing disorder. Look for clues of a pending meltdown as the child may begin to feel overwhelmed. Allow the opportunity to calm down before returning to the activity.

The following resources below includes worksheets, templates and interactive games.

Busy Teacher. Provides beginner steps to teaching time

Education World. Lesson plans including a bingo card and additional resources on telling time

Scholastic. A lesson plan on teaching time using an analog clock model including information on pre-instructional planning and a clock template

Scholastic. Provides 10 ways to practice time skills

Teaching Time. Site includes worksheets, interactive games and templates.

The Mad House. Blog on how to make a paper plate clock- Great multisensory activity for learners

Third Space Learning. A blog article that provides a step by step technique on teaching time including ways to reduce cognitive overload.

We Are Teachers. 5 hands on ways to teach telling time. The webpage also includes a free blank watch for children to color.

Worksheet Generator

Home School Math.Net

Telling Time Quiz

Clock Wise

Games For Telling Time

Clock Games

Just In Time

Teaching Clock

What Time Is It?

Worksheets Printables

Common Core Worksheets

Education.com

Math.aids.com

Telling Time To The Hour

Why Children With ‘Severe Autism’ Are Overlooked by Science

Published by: Spectrum
Writtten by: Alisa Opar

 

It should have been a perfect day. Lauren Primmer was hosting an annual party at her home in New Hampshire for families that, like hers, have adopted children from Ethiopia. On the warm, sunny July afternoon, about 40 people gathered for a feast of hot dogs, hamburgers and homemade Ethiopian dishes. The adults sipped drinks and caught up while the children swam in the pool and played basketball. It was entirely pleasant — at least, until the cake was served. When Primmer told her 11-year-old son Asaminew that he couldn’t have a second piece, he threw a tantrum so violent it took three adults to hold him down on the grass.
The Primmers adopted Asaminew from an orphanage in Ethiopia in 2008, when he was 26 months old. They had already adopted another child from the same orphanage in Ethiopia, and they have four older biological children. From the beginning, Primmer says, “He would only go to me, not anyone else.” That tendency, she later learned, may have been a symptom of reactive detachment disorder, a condition seen in some children who didn’t establish healthy emotional attachments with their caregivers as infants.
About a year and a half later, the family adopted three more Ethiopian children — siblings about Asaminew’s age — and he became aggressive. “When they first came, Asaminew was very abusive,” Primmer recalls. “He’d bite and scratch them.” The Primmers had to install gates on all of the children’s bedroom doors for their safety. Soon after he entered preschool, Asaminew began lashing out at his classmates, too. His teachers suggested that he be evaluated for autism. Doctors at the Dartmouth Hitchcock Clinic in Manchester, New Hampshire, diagnosed him with the condition. In addition to his violent episodes, they took note of his obsession with lining up toy cars and flushing toilets, his habit of taking his clothes off in public and his tendency to not follow rules at home or school. Asaminew is intellectually disabled and speaks in short, simple sentences. Click here to read the rest of the story

Creating Successful Museum Expereinces For Children With Disabiliites

Published by: Art Works Blog
Written by: Rebecca Sutton

When Roger Ideishi was helping a Philadelphia aquarium develop programming for children with cognitive and sensory disorders, he surveyed parents to see whether or not they thought their child would engage with programming by touching a starfish. “Every single parent said their child would not touch the starfish,” said Ideishi, a professor at Temple University who specializes in helping organizations develop meaningful experiences for children with disabilities. “Guess what happened? Every child touched the starfish.”

It’s an example of the happy surprises that can occur when taking children with sensory or cognitive disorders to community institutions such as Blue Star Museums, which include several aquariums around the country. “Without these opportunities, parents wouldn’t have known that their children had these other capacities or interests,” said Ideishi. Click here to read the rest of the story.

8 Proven Stategies To Attract And Retain Job Candidates On The Autism Spectrum

Published by: ERE Recruiting Intelligence
Written by: Samatha Craft

Here are several strategies for attracting and retaining autistic job candidates, based on my experience working as a job recruiter and community manager for a U.S. technology company that provides employment for individuals on the autism spectrum.

Understand autism from different perspectives

Take time to read up on autism, including cultural and historical context by respected journalist. Examples of two well-received books are: NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity and In a Different Key: The Story of Autism. Consider professional accounts from well-known experts in the autism field, such as psychologist Tony Attwood and job coach Barbara Bissonnette. Click here to read the rest of the story.

About High Sensitivity, Autism & Neurodivesity

Published by: The Highly Sensitive Person
By: Elaine

To be very clear, the brain research continues to find high sensitivity and autism quite different, but they also have something in common. High sensitivity and autism spectrum are terms that describe differences—differences in brains that make them not typical. The neurodiversity “movement” wonders why the majority of brain differences (not due to injury or infection) can’t be seen as simply variations in human experiences rather than some of them being disorders? A disorder means someone is impaired or suffering, and we have made it very clear that people are not impaired or suffering simply because of having a highly sensitive brain. Likewise, many of those on the autism spectrum (or diagnosed with ADHD) also feel they are wrongly viewed as having a disorder when in fact their particular trait (brain difference), even if unusual, can make important contributions to the world. They do not feel impaired or that they are suffering. They feel they are just different. Read the rest of the story here

Helping Your Autistic Child Work Through Their fear of Storms

Published by: Emaxhealth

Written By: Brooke Price

We all know that when summer approaches so do those summer storms. You know the ones with lightening, thunder and black outs. Many of us parents of Autistic and special needs children find that our children are especially scared of storms. Their fears overtake them and sometimes it becomes too much and they meltdown. Nothing is worse than a meltdown, at night, when you have candles lit, it is storming, and you have no power. Here are some great pointers for how to calm your child during the storm seasons, or really to help you work your Autistic child through any fear. Click here to read the rest of the story

10 Things ADHD Is– and 3 It isn’t

Published by: Self Magazine

Written by: Christiana Stiehl

Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, or ADHD, is one of those mental health conditions that has become cultural shorthand in a pretty inappropriate way. Ignoring the fact that “I’m so ADHD” isn’t even grammatically correct, throwing this acronym around to flippantly explain distraction or disinterest waters down the true meaning of this extremely nuanced disorder. Not only that, it can further isolate those who do have ADHD, since they’re often already misunderstood. To dispel some of the common myths surrounding ADHD, we’ve broken down what the disorder actually is—and a couple things it isn’t, too. Click here to read the rest of the story

What is Stimming?

Published by: Medical News Today

Written by: Lori Smith

Repetitive body movements or repetitive movement of objects is referred to as self-stimulatory behavior, abbreviated to stimming. Stimming can occur in people with autism and other developmental disabilities.

Some people will stim when nervous, employing behaviors such as pacing, biting their nails, hair twirling, or tapping their feet or fingers.

In this article, we will examine why stimming occurs and the different types that occur. We will also look at what can be done if someone’s stimming behaviors are causing them problems in day-to-day life. Click here to read the rest of the story

27 Things to Know About Fragile X Syndrome

 

  1. It is a genetic condition
  2. Males are more affected than females
  3. Seizures occur in about 15% of males and 5% of females
  4. 1/3 individuals have similar characteristics of autism
  5. Features may include long and narrow face. large ears prominent jaw and flat feet
  6. Fragile X occurs in approximately 1 in 4,000 males and 1 in 8,000 females
  7. Symptoms oftn often include mild to moderate intellectual disability
  8. Child with Fragile X tend to have short attention span
  9. Self-talk is common using different tones and pitches
  10. In 1969, Herbert Lubs first discovered an unusual markers X chromosome in association with an intellectual disability.
  11. In 1970, Frederick Hecht coined the term Fragile site
  12. In 1985 Felix F. De La Cruz outlined physical. psychological, characteristics of those
  13. It is inherited
  14. Early signs may include developmental delays such as late developmental in sitting, walking, etc.
  15. In 1943, James, Purdon Martin and Julia Bell described a pedigree of the x-linked mental disability
  16. Fragile X is caused by a mutation in a single gene.
  17. Fragile X is also called Martin-Bell Syndrome
  18. Fragile X Syndrome has been found in all major ethnic groups and races
  19. Fragile x is the most common form of inherited developmental disability
  20. Fragile X is often mis-diagnosed
  21. It is formally named Martin-Bell
  22. It was first discovered  in 1943
  23. It is found in all races and socio-economic levels
  24. It varies from borderline to severe
  25. Diagnosis of Fragile X is due through DNA test and genetic counseling
  26. Fragile X changes can occur from one generation to the next
  27. Fragile X is inherited through the mother