Free Printable Cerebral Palsy Fact Sheet

Want to learn more about Cerebral Palsy?  The following is a fact sheet that provides information on the facts of cerebral palsy including the definition and the prevalence, signs, types, and causes.

The fact sheet also includes information on teaching strategies and organizational resources.

Download fact sheet here

Cerebral Palsy- Facts and Statistics

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Cerebral Palsy (CP) is a group of disorders that affect a person’s ability to move and maintain balance and posture. It is the most common motor disability in childhood. It is estimated that an average of 1 in 345 children in the U.S. have cerebral palsy

The following are facts and statistics worldwide on cerebral palsy:

  • Around 764,000 people in the United states have at least one symptom of cerebral palsy
  • Around 10,000 babies are born each year with cerebral palsy
  • Boys are diagnosed more often than girls
  • Cerebral palsy is the mot commonly diagnosed childhood motor disability in the United States
  • Over 77% of children with cerebral palsy have the spastic form
  • More than 50% of all children with cerebral palsy can walk independently
  • African American children with cerebral palsy are 1.7 times more likely to need assistance with walking or be unable to walk at all
  • Around 41% of babies and children with cerebral palsy will have limited abilities in crawling, walking and running.
  • Around 41% children with cerebral palsy in the United states have some form of a cognitive disorder
  • Behavior problems are common in children with cerebral palsy including social skills and anger issues.
  • Seizures are a common associate disorder of cerebral palsy and can range from mild to extreme severe.
  • There is no known cure
Australia Facts and Statistics
  • 1 in 700 Australian babies is diagnosed each year
  • 1 in 2 is in chronic pain
  • 1 in 2 has an intellectual disability
  • 1 in 3 cannot walk
  • 1 in 4 also has epilepsy
  • 1 in 3 has hip displacement
  • 1 in 4 cannot talk
  • 1 in 4 has a behavior disorder
  • 1 in 5 is tube fed
  • 1 in 5 has a sleep disorder
  • 1 in 10 has a severe vision impairment
  • 1 in 25 has a severe hearing impairment
United Kingdom- Facts and Statistics
  • The current United Kingdom incidence rate is around 1 in 400 births
  • Approximately 1800 children are diagnosed with cerebral palsy each year
  • There are an estimated 30,000 children with cerebral palsy in the United Kingdom
  • For every 100 girls with cerebral palsy, there are 135 boys with cerebral palsy
  • just under half of children with cerebral palsy were born prematurely
  • One in three children with cerebral palsy is unable to walk
  • One in four children with cerebral palsy cannot feed or dress themselves
  • one in four children with cerebral palsy has a learning disability
  • one in fifty children with cerebral palsy has a hearing impairment

 

Resources

Cerebral Palsy Alliance-Australia

Cerebral Palsy Guidance

The Pace Centre Organization

Free Printable Angleman Syndrome Factsheet

English pediatrician, Dr. Harry Angleman first described Angelman syndrome in 1965 when he observed 3 children who had similar features including unusual happiness, developmental delays and similar facial disorders. He originally called it the “Happy Puppet Syndrome” based in a 17th century Italian painting by Gian Francesco Coroto. In most cases, a gene located on chromosome 15 is generally missing or damaged, in some cases, the individual may have 2 copies of the paternal chromosome 15. It is considered a developmental disability where children and adults will require ongoing services. Click the link below to download the factsheet.

Download factsheet here

Top 10 Trainings Every Bus Driver and Matron Should Have

Transporting a child with a disability to school on a bus is indeed a huge responsibility. For children with a disability, alertness matters as well ensuring bus drivers and matrons are trained on managing many issues that can arise on the bus. the following are the top ten trainings every bus driver and matron should have:

CPR. Although in adults cardiac arrest is often sudden and results from a cardiac cause, in children with cardiac arrest is often secondary to respiratory failure and shock. A CPR course will teach the sequence of steps for children including basic steps for calling for additional assistance.

First Aid. A course in first aid will train bus drivers and matrons steps to take in the case of an emergency. Children with disabilities have a variety of issues, taking a course in a first aid course can help to save a child’s life. Courses should include topics on choking, bleeding, injuries, allergic reactions, sudden illnesses and signs and symptoms.

Disability Awareness. This will  help both bus drivers and matrons identify and understand their own personal attitudes and perception regarding children and adults with disabilities.

Overview of Developmental Disability. Understanding the various types of developmental disabilities is vital in transporting children and adults from home to school. A course on developmental disability should include information on learning about the different types of disabilities,  including cognitive, physical and invisible. An overview should also include information on barriers that exist for people with disabilities.

Introduction to Epilepsy. Children and adults with disabilities tend to experience a high prevalence of epilepsy. Both drivers and matrons should be aware there are several types of seizures from generalize seizures to partial seizures. Some children experience seizures where it may appear they are simply staring. A training on epilepsy will teach ways to recognize the signs of epilepsy what do to in the event of a seizure while driving.

Understanding Behaviors. All behaviors have a meaning . It is a way of communicating for children and adults who may not have the ability to express pain, fear or anger verbally.

Bus Safety and Disabilities. Bus drivers are generally taught how to drive the bus or van in a safe manner. But what in instances when there is an emergency with children with disabilities on board? There should be training on emergencies that can occur on the bus including fires, accidents, and vehicle breakdown.

Recognizing Abuse. Studies show a large number of children with disabilities are abused and even larger numbers are bullied. a training course in recognizing abuse should cover not only looking for physical signs, but also children who are mistreated and neglected as well.

Safe Loading. Keeping children safe on the bus on van is one of the key responsibilities of the bus driver and matron. Some children with disabilities may use wheelchairs and other adaptive equipment. Trainings should include knowledge on using the wheelchair lift including the manual lift in the case of an emergency. Vital information includes safe securing of lap trays, electrical wheelchairs, vest of harness which should be monitored during the bus ride.

Overview of Autism. While no two students are alike. there are general characteristics that children with autism may exhibit including, anxiety, depression, seizure disorder, cognitive delays, sensory challenges and repetitive behaviors. Being well-informed of autism and how to mange will make the bus ride go smooth on those challenging days.

Can you think of any other important trainings bus drivers and matron should have when transporting a child with a disability?