Grilled Cheese Sandwich Lesson Plan

Goal: Increase Independent Living Skills

Lesson Objective: Student will make a grilled cheese sandwich with verbal assistance.

Prerequisite Skills: 

  • ability to use a knife
  • able to follow directions

Introduction: A fun and easy meal to make with an individual with a developmental disability is a grilled cheese sandwich. Very few ingredients are needed to make this tasty meal and it is often one of the first foods that many people learn to make.  This activity allows an opportunity for independence and a great reward when completed. The instructor will follow the following steps:

Step 1: The instructor will first make sure the person washes and dries their hands appropriately.

Step 2: The instructor will allow for choices. “What type of bread would you like to use.”, What type of cheese would you like to use?”

Step 3. Depending on the skill level, the instructor will assist the individual or place the pan n top of the stop

Step 4. The instructor will, with verbal prompting or hand over hand, ask the individual to pick the the knife.

Step 5. Once the individual picks up the knife, the instructor will verbally prompt or using hand over hand, assist the individual with cutting the butter.

Step 6. Once the butter is cut, the instructor will verbally prompt the individual to place the butter in the pan.

Step 7. While the butter is meting in the pan, the instructor will prompt the individual to take out 2 slices of bread and place on a plate

Step 8. The instructor will prompt the individual to pick up the knife and butter each slice of the bread.

Step 9. Once completed, the instructor will prompt the individual to take cheese out of the refrigerator and place on the bread.

Step 10. The instructor will prompt or assist the individual to place the sandwich into the pan

Step 11. Depending on the skill level, the instructor will turn the bread over when brown or closely supervise the individual.

Step 12. Once both sides are brown, the instructor will assist or supervise the individual removing the cheese toast with a spatula and place on a plate

Step 13. The instructor will prompt the individual to turn off the stove. i.e. “what do you think you should do next?”

Step 14. The instructor will prompt the individual to cut the cheese toast in half.

Step 15. The individual will start to eat.

Duration:10-15 minutes

Materials:

  • 2 slices of bread
  • margarine or butter
  • Cheddar or American cheese
  • frying Pan
  • knife
  • spatula

Skills Taught:

  • Attention skills
  • Choice-making
  • Fine motor
  • Independent living skills
  • Listening comprehensive
  • Memory
  • Sensory
  • Sequencing
  • Task attention

Special Considerations

Be mindful of any protocols for the individuals. make sure you are serving the meal with the right consistency. For example does the individual require his/her food to be cut up or are they able to eat whole foods?

Special Needs COVID-19 Resources and Information

Hi Everyone, Like most people in the world, the COVID-19 Virus has greatly impacted my own little universe. Living in the epicenter of the virus at last count, almost 4,000 people in my county have tested positive. I too seek ways to live a normal life in these trying times.  Its been very challenging to continue to write articles on special needs with so much is going on in the world.

Looking to see how I can help others during this time, I created COVID-19 virus page which I will continue to add more information as we learn more. I advise you to stay tune to both local news and get regular updates from the CDC as they update on a regular basis. If you are a reader from another County, please check on updates from your government on a regular basis.

Please all stay safe during these trying times, continue to help one another and we will come out from this better and stronger.

 

Articles on what you need to know about the COVID-19 Virus:

CDC

CNET.Com

RWJ Barnabas Health

Washington Post

UNICEF- What parents should know

CDC Resources

Cases in the United States

Community and Faith Based Leaders

How to prepare

Guidance for Schools and Childcare Programs

Travel

The following are free social stories on Teachers Pay Teachers Must have a log on account):

COVID-19 No Print Social Story

COVID 19 and Social distancing Story

COVID 19 Social Narrative

Social Narrative for Autism

The following links and information comes  from the U.S. Education Department. Check for updated information:

Additional Resources for Higher Education Institutions:

Schools should continue promoting everyday disease prevention strategies:

  • If you are sick, stay home from school.
  • Avoid close contact with those who are already sick.
  • Cover your nose and mouth when coughing or sneezing with a tissue or the crook of your arm.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water.
  • Avoid touching eyes, nose, or mouth.
  • Consult this web page for further guidance from the U.S. Department of Education.

Schools can share relevant CDC fact sheets to help students, families, and staff understand COVID-19 along with steps they can take to protect themselves:

COVID-19 and Special Needs

Best practices in using telemedicine for ADHD during the COVID-19 pandemic

Coronavirus and Anxiety

How to help a child with autism adjust

Supporting families through COVID-19

Handwashing

CDC- Handwashing Training and Education-Includes lessons and activities for all ages including a 30-page PDF and age appropriate handwashing curriculum.

Free Printables– Activities from nourishinteractive.com, includes handwashing worksheets, lesson plans and a math sequencing worksheet that teaches the important steps to good handwashing techniques.

Kids Handwashing Coloring Page– Developed by Lancaster County Health Department including 2 coloring pages and instructions on how to wash your hands properly.

Teach-nology- A lesson plan for kids pre-school age which discusses germs and how germs make people sick.

Why We Wash Our Hands– From Florida Health Department for children ages 3-41/2. The lesson educates children on how to prevent common health problems by developing handwashing skills.

The following articles are links to articles specific to handwashing and the COVID-19 virus:

CDC- Handwashing and Prevention

Family Doctor

UNICEF

USAToday

The following are worksheets to keep your little ones busy during this time:

Identify Money Freebie

Free Printable Money WorkSheets

Free Skip Counting by 5″s Worksheet

 

Free Printable Cerebral Palsy Fact Sheet

Want to learn more about Cerebral Palsy?  The following is a fact sheet that provides information on the facts of cerebral palsy including the definition and the prevalence, signs, types, and causes.

The fact sheet also includes information on teaching strategies and organizational resources.

Download fact sheet here

Cerebral Palsy- Facts and Statistics

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Cerebral Palsy (CP) is a group of disorders that affect a person’s ability to move and maintain balance and posture. It is the most common motor disability in childhood. It is estimated that an average of 1 in 345 children in the U.S. have cerebral palsy

The following are facts and statistics worldwide on cerebral palsy:

  • Around 764,000 people in the United states have at least one symptom of cerebral palsy
  • Around 10,000 babies are born each year with cerebral palsy
  • Boys are diagnosed more often than girls
  • Cerebral palsy is the mot commonly diagnosed childhood motor disability in the United States
  • Over 77% of children with cerebral palsy have the spastic form
  • More than 50% of all children with cerebral palsy can walk independently
  • African American children with cerebral palsy are 1.7 times more likely to need assistance with walking or be unable to walk at all
  • Around 41% of babies and children with cerebral palsy will have limited abilities in crawling, walking and running.
  • Around 41% children with cerebral palsy in the United states have some form of a cognitive disorder
  • Behavior problems are common in children with cerebral palsy including social skills and anger issues.
  • Seizures are a common associate disorder of cerebral palsy and can range from mild to extreme severe.
  • There is no known cure
Australia Facts and Statistics
  • 1 in 700 Australian babies is diagnosed each year
  • 1 in 2 is in chronic pain
  • 1 in 2 has an intellectual disability
  • 1 in 3 cannot walk
  • 1 in 4 also has epilepsy
  • 1 in 3 has hip displacement
  • 1 in 4 cannot talk
  • 1 in 4 has a behavior disorder
  • 1 in 5 is tube fed
  • 1 in 5 has a sleep disorder
  • 1 in 10 has a severe vision impairment
  • 1 in 25 has a severe hearing impairment
United Kingdom- Facts and Statistics
  • The current United Kingdom incidence rate is around 1 in 400 births
  • Approximately 1800 children are diagnosed with cerebral palsy each year
  • There are an estimated 30,000 children with cerebral palsy in the United Kingdom
  • For every 100 girls with cerebral palsy, there are 135 boys with cerebral palsy
  • just under half of children with cerebral palsy were born prematurely
  • One in three children with cerebral palsy is unable to walk
  • One in four children with cerebral palsy cannot feed or dress themselves
  • one in four children with cerebral palsy has a learning disability
  • one in fifty children with cerebral palsy has a hearing impairment

 

Resources

Cerebral Palsy Alliance-Australia

Cerebral Palsy Guidance

The Pace Centre Organization

Teaching Counting to Special Needs Students

Teaching individuals to count is an early prerequisite to working on money skills. Before starting to work on a counting goals, students should be able to count numbers 1- 100. Make sure to break any counting activities into short, easy-to-manage steps and provide clear expectations.

6 methods for teaching money counting-Thought Co.

7 ways to teaching counting to 100- Raising Da Vinci

10 tips to teach numbers and alphabets to children with autism– The Learning App

Counting Strategies– National Council of Teachers of Mathematics

Easy way to teach preschool children to count– VeryWell

Math: Counting and Comparing– The Yale Center for Dyslexia and Creativity

Skip Counting for Autism– Autism Educators

Teaching Counting- The Autism Helper

Teaching Counting Skills– The Autism Helper

Teaching Counting– National Center on Intensive Intervention

Attention Skills Strategies

Attention is defined as the ability to keep the mind on something and the ability to concentrate. Skills often include careful observation or listening. The ability for a student to sustain attention, motivation, language, and sensory intervention. Children with autism, ADHD, intellectual disabilities, executive functioning disorders, and Cri du Chat have difficulty sustaining attention over a long period of time.

Strategies they may provide to be useful include:

  • Eye Contact
  • Repeat instructions
  • Provide frequent breaks
  • Use in a leadership role.
  • Provide choices in test-taking
  • Ongoing prompting.

The following are articles on ways to improve concentration and attention:

4 concentration activities for students – Getting Smart

7 in-class activities to improve concentration in children-TEACH

10 Games to boost attention and focus– Heart-Mind Online

Attention Activities– The OT Toolbox

Activities that help develop attention skills– Boise Speech and Hearing Clinic

Attention and Concentration– Kidsense

Brain training activities– Our Journey Westward

Pay attention: Ten steps to improving attention and concentration- ADHD Center

The attention games: Catching focus through fun– Additude

Using play to increase attention– Miss Jaime OT

10 Valentine’s Day Fine Motor Activites

Here are some fun fine motor activities to do with your students. Children and adults with special needs often face challenges with coordination of the small muscles that affect writing, and grasping objects. These activities will help students both strengthen and maintain abilities in fine motor control and dexterity. For these activities, you will need the following supplies:

  • scissors
  • construction paper
  • glue or paste

50 Easy Valentine’s Day Crafts and Activities- From the Thrifty Kiwi

Brain-Building Valentines Activities– From Integrated Learning Strategies

Heart Bunny Rabbit Craft– From Crafty Morning

Valentine’s Day Fine Motor Activity– From No Time For Flash Cards

Valentine’s Day Fine Motor Activity– From The Resourceful Mama

Valentine’s Day Fine Motor Activity for Preschool– From Pre-K Pages

Valentine’s Day Fine Motor Sparkle Craft –  From The OT Toolbox

Valentine’s Day Tree Paper Craft– From Housing a Forest

Valentine’s Day Scissor Cutting Practice Tray– From I heart Crafty Things

Valentine Heart ORCA Whale Craft- From Crafty Morning

Free Skip Counting by 5″s Worksheet

Learning to skip count helps students in many ways including seeing patterns in numbers and preparing students for more complex math skills including adding, subtraction and multiplication. It ialso helps students to learn how to count forward and backwards develop entry levels skills to developing money management skills.

Use the worksheets below to practice skip counting by five’s

counting  cherries worksheet

 

counting ice cream cones worksheets

 

counting sea shells

 

counting water bottles

counting stars

 

11 Resources on Teaching Personal Safety Skills To Special Needs Children and Adults

Studies show that both children and adults with developmental disabilities are vulnerable to incidents of abuse and injuries. Personal safety includes learning about being safe and dangerous environments. The following articles focus on teaching tips in both the community and in the home.

5 tips on teaching safety skills to children with autism

A guide to personal safety

Community safety skills

How to help individuals with disabilities be safe in the community

Personal safety programs for children with intellectual disabilities

Safety First: Teaching safety skills to children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Teaching people with intellectual disabilities about fire emergencies

Teaching safety awareness skills to children with autism

Teaching stranger safety skills to children and adults with disabilities

Safety Activities

Activities that teach safety

Safety worksheets from Teacher Vision

Identify Money Freebie

Learn to identify coins is one of the first steps in learning to count and understanding money management skills. The following worksheets will help to reinforce the ability to recognize the various denominations of coins.

The lesson plan below is a helpful tool to reinforce recognizing coins.  Children with intellectual disabilities and special needs learn best through visual demonstrations and pictures. Remember to allow extra time to complete the task and use simple directions.

Lesson Plan: Identify Coins

Objective: the Student will successfully identify coins

Performance Criteria: The student will identify the correct coin, 3 out of 5 trials

Materials Needed:

  • coin worksheets
  • actual penny, nickle, dime and quarter
  • pencil

Steps:

  1. the instructor will use real coins and identify the coin to the student
  2. the instructor will use one coin at a time, starting with the smallest demoninator
  3. The instructor will pick up the penny and state, “this is a penny.”
  4. The instructor will then ask the student to pick up the penny
  5. The instructor will aske the student to describe the penny
  6. The instructor will ask the student the value of the penny.
  7. Once completed, the instructor will have the student complete the worksheet
  8. The insstructor will continue with the rest of the coins.

Circle Nickle Worksheet

id coin worksheet

circle penny worksheet

circle dime