Teaching Strategies for Students with Cerebral Palsy

Cerebral palsy is a motor disorder which results from damage to the brain occurring before, during and after birth. Cerebral palsy is the most common motor disability in childhood and it is estimated that 1 in 323 individuals have been identified with cerebral palsy.

Since cerebral palsy is the result of damage to the brain, it impacts each person differently ranging from severe to mild symptoms. It is estimated that many children with cerebral palsy also have at least one co-occurring condition. For instance, 41% had co-occurring epilepsy and 40% of children were diagnosed with an intellectual disability.

Teaching strategies should focus on assistive technology, fine and gross motor skills, and personal care. Accommodations and modifications should include providing extra time for task completion.

The following links provide information on teaching strategies.

Accommodating a student with cerebral palsy

Cerebral palsy in the classroom

How to make your classroom inclusive for students with cerebral palsy

How to teach children with cerebral palsy

Inclusive teaching strategies for students with cerebral palsy

Students with mild cerebral palsy in the classroom: Information and guidelines for teachers

What teachers should know about children with cerebral palsy

Teaching Strategies for Students with Orthopedic Impairments

The definition of orthopedic impairment under IDEA means a severe orthopedic impairment that adversely affects a child’s education performance. Causes include:

  • genetic
  • disease
  • injury
  • birth trauma
  • burns
  • fractures
  • cerebral palsy amputation

There are 3 classifications that an orthopedic impairment can fall under:

  1. Neuromotor impairment, this would include cerebral palsy, spinal cord injuries, spina bifida, and seizure disorders
  2. Degenerative Disease such as muscular dystrophy and Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome
  3. Musculoskeletal Disorders including scoliosis and deformed limbs.

Students with orthopedic impairments often qualify for therapy including physical and occupational therapy. assistive technology should be included for accommodating the students needs.

The following links provide resources on teaching assessment, modifications, and teaching information.

Orthopedic impairment: A guide for parents and teachers

Orthopedic impairment characteristics: Classroom modification and assistive technology

Orthopedic impairment and special needs students

Orthopedic impairment disability

Teaching strategies for mobility impaired students

Teaching strategies for orthopedic impairment

Teaching students with disabilities: Orthopedic impairment

Teaching students with orthopedic impairment

Understanding individuals with physical, health, and multiple disabilities

Teaching Visually Impaired Students

According to IDEA’s definition, visually impairment is defined as including blindness means an impairment in vision that, even with correction, adversely affects a child’s educational performance. The term includes both partial sight and blindness. There are 3 types of blindness including The types of vision impairments are low visual acuity, blindness, and legal blindness (which varies for each country): Low visual acuity, also known as moderate visual impairment, is a visual acuity between 20/70 and 20/400 with your best corrected vision, or a visual field of no more than 20 degrees.

The following articles and links provide resources on teaching students with visual impairments.

Teaching Strategies

The following are articles that provide tips and resources on teaching students with visual impairments.

10 tips for teaching blind or visually impaired students

Classroom strategies for regular education teachers who have students with visual impairments

General tips for teaching visually impaired students

How to teach a blind or visually impaired student

Inclusion teaching: Vision impairment and blindness

Teaching languages to blind and visually impaired students

Teaching strategies for vision impaired students

Teaching the blind and visually impaired

Strategies for helping children with visual impairments to develop listening skills

Visual impairment in the classroom

Teaching Activities

The following links provide activities that can used to teach students with visual impairments.

Adapting materials for visually impaired students

Create a restaurant book with tactile symbols

Durable braille flashcards

Tips and tools for teaching beginning braille skills

 

15 Teaching Strategy Resources for Students With Hearing Impairments

 

Accommodations for students with hearing loss

Five tips for teachers of students with hearing impairments

How to teach hearing impaired students: Strategies for success

Inclusive teaching: deaf and hearing impaired

Instructional strategies for students who are deaf or hard of hearing

Modern teaching techniques for deaf and hard of hearing students

Strategies for hearing impaired students

Suggested teaching strategies

Teaching a child with hearing loss

Teaching hearing impaired children

Teaching strategies for deaf and hearing impaired

Teaching strategies for hearing impaired students

Tips for teachers

Tips for teaching a preschooler with hearing loss

Visual teaching strategies for students who are deaf or hard of hearing

Identifying Street Signs Worksheet

This is an introduction to identifying street signs for children and young adults learning how to cross the street safely. The worksheet includes signs needed in teaching street crossing safety.

Learning Objectives:

  • Will match the traffic sign correctly
  • Will identify the traffic sign correctly
  • Will name the traffic sign correctly

Material Needed:

Traffic sign worksheet
laminated (optional)
laminator paper(optional)
Scissors

Instructions:

  1. Once you have printed the worksheet, cut the individual traffic signs and laminate.
  2. Explain each traffic sign and have the individual repeat.
  3. Once the signs are separated, mix them up and have the individual point to the correct ones.
  4. Have the individual state the traffic signs correctly and match

Traffic Signs Worksheet_ID Signs

 

Election Lesson Plan and Activities for Day Hab

Since President Trump’s, election, there has been a vigorous interest in politics not only in the United States but also in other countries as well. The upcoming mid-term elections provides an opportunity for adults with developmental disabilities to participate through a lesson plan created not only on the upcoming election, but also ways to get individuals more involved on topics and platforms that impact their lives.

Sadly, I have heard very little from politicians on issues concerning people with disabilities and the impact it will have on people with disabilities and their families. This affords an opportunity to have real discussion with people on issues that are important to them through a series of multisensory activities.

  1. Who doesn’t like a game of bingo? Download the bingo template, make as many copies as you wish and set up an activity playing Bingo. Once you call out a name. use it as an opportunity to have discussion i.e. How would you describe a conservative? When is the election held? Below, click on the template


Bingo.download

2. The second activity includes a week-long lesson plan on election and representative in office using a multisensory approach.  The first day is set up for making an apple smoothie and a trip preparation activities allowing individuals to work on their social and money management skills. I left the lesson plan editable so that you can move activities around as you wish.


election.dayhab

Materials Needed for the lesson plan activities

Mock Voter Registration

mock voter registration

Apple Smoothie Recipe

Apple Smoothie Recipe

Caramel Apple Smoothie

Patriotic Printable Paper Chain

Free patriotic printable chain

Patriotic paper chain with needed supplies

Oh, this is also a great activity to use a home or school for students at the high school level.

 

May Special Needs Article Links

Mayarticlelink

Welcome to the May article links and resources. These are articles that I  tweeted  and received during the month of May on special needs and developmental disability topics. I tweet articles and links everyday.

3 types of autism spectrum disorder explained (Bustle)

6 resources for working with scouts with autism (Scouting Magazine)

8 learning strategies for children with ADHD (Advance Psychology)

17 ways to help students with ADHD concentrate (Edutopia)

30 academic resources on learning ( Informed)

A letter to my child without ADHD (ADDitude Magazine)

Adult ADHD slipping under the radar (The Sidney Morning Herald)

Aging out of sensory storytime: How libraries can provide services for teens and young adults on the autism spectrum (American Libraries)

Autism-friendly Broadway performances allow families to enjoy theatre together (Fox News Health)

Brain signals between seizures may explain memory problems in patients with epilepsy (Medical Press)

Children with ADHD may benefit from following healthy behaviors, new study suggests (Science News)

Effectively teaching mathematics to students with Down syndrome (Teacher)

Flying with autism: 10 smart tips for an enjoyable experience (Cruising with Autism)

High school senior with cerebral palsy breaks barriers in sports world (WBRC)

Mother pens book about raising 1 twin with autism, 1 without (Fox News Health)

Museum of Disability to open exhibit on Down Syndrome (The Buffalo News)

Navigating an online education for students with disabilities (Online Schools Center)

Not wrong, just different: wisdom for those dealing with ADHD (Huffpost Education)

UK grocery store to offer ‘quiet hours’ for shoppers with autism (Fox News)

Young man with Down syndrome becomes youngest business owner in his town (Eyewitness News)

Over 30 Online Resources on Rett Syndrome

 

rett-syndrome logo
So much has been written on the subject of Autism, but how much do you know about Rett Syndrome? This disorder fall under the autism spectrum disorder category due to similar traits and characteristics.

Rett Syndrome is a neuro-developmental rare disorder that affects primarily girls. Discovered by Andreas Rett who described the symptoms as wasting and slow growth. Rett Syndrome is rare and occurs in 1 out of 23,000 births. The disorder consists of four stages:
Stage 1: Generally begins between the ages of 6 and 18 months. Gross motor skills begin to slow down and stagnates
Stage 2: Between the age of 1 and 3 years, will regress and lose any skills that were previous acquired.
Stage 3: During this stage, apaxia becomes apparent. Seizures become common and gross motor skills deteriorate.
Stage 4. Loses all gross motor skills and generally uses a wheelchair.

Symptoms

  • Difficulty in coordination
  • Loss of communication skills
  • Dyspraxia
  • Severe motor disabilities
  • Abnormal hand movement
  • Breathing abnormalities
  • Cold hands and feet
  • Apraxia
Similar in Autism Characteristics include:
  • Screaming
  • Crying
  • Hyperventilation
  • Lack of eye contact
Similarities in cerebral palsy include:
  • Hypotonia
  • Gait difficulties
  • Spasticity
  • Teeth-grinding

Medical Sites

Boston Children’s Hospital
Cleveland Clinic
Mayo Clinic
MedicineNet.com
Medscape
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Strokes
National Organization for Rare Disorder
Science Daily
WebMD
Wikipedia

Organizations and Foundations

Girl Power 2 Cure
Kate Foundation
New Jersey Rett Syndrome Association
Northwest Rett Syndrome Foundation
Rett Syndrome.org
Southeastern Rett Syndrome Alliance

Twitter

Rett Girl
Rett Syndrome GP2C
Rett Syndrome News
Rett UK

Facebook

Cure Rett
Ontario Rett Syndrome Association
Rett Syndrome of Ireland

Blogs

Grace for Rett
Jessica’s Journey with Rett Syndrome
Living with Rett Syndrome
My Silent Angel’s Fight

Teaching Strategies

ACC for Children Who Have Rett Syndrome
Multi-Model Communication Strategies
Rett Syndrome: Teacher Tools
Some Rett Syndrome Tips

You Tube Video’s