Teaching Strategies for Students with Orthopedic Impairments

The definition of orthopedic impairment under IDEA means a severe orthopedic impairment that adversely affects a child’s education performance. Causes include:

  • genetic
  • disease
  • injury
  • birth trauma
  • burns
  • fractures
  • cerebral palsy amputation

There are 3 classifications that an orthopedic impairment can fall under:

  1. Neuromotor impairment, this would include cerebral palsy, spinal cord injuries, spina bifida, and seizure disorders
  2. Degenerative Disease such as muscular dystrophy and Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome
  3. Musculoskeletal Disorders including scoliosis and deformed limbs.

Students with orthopedic impairments often qualify for therapy including physical and occupational therapy. assistive technology should be included for accommodating the students needs.

The following links provide resources on teaching assessment, modifications, and teaching information.

Orthopedic impairment: A guide for parents and teachers

Orthopedic impairment characteristics: Classroom modification and assistive technology

Orthopedic impairment and special needs students

Orthopedic impairment disability

Teaching strategies for mobility impaired students

Teaching strategies for orthopedic impairment

Teaching students with disabilities: Orthopedic impairment

Teaching students with orthopedic impairment

Understanding individuals with physical, health, and multiple disabilities

Accommodating Visually Impaired Students

 

Accommodations and modifications at a glance: Educational accommodations for students who are blind or visually impaired

Accommodations for students who are visually impaired

Basic classroom modifications and assistive technology for students with visual impairments

Classroom accommodations for students with visual impairments

Classroom adaptations for students with low vision

College guided for students with visual impairments

Effective classroom adaptations for students with visual impairments

Material adaptations for individuals who are blind or visually impaired

Section 504 for educators and parents of children with visual impairments

Students who are blind or have visually impairments

Teaching Special Needs Individuals Temperature Taking

In some residences and group homes, individuals are being monitored for COVID19 by daily temperature readings. People with disabilities are probably used to getting their temperatures taking each time they are seen by their physician. In these challenging times, why not teach the skill of taking one own’s temperature. It is a basic independent living skill to learn.

 

Using a digital thermometer would probably be the most effective and it is also easy to read. teaching thermometer reading affects the following skill:

  • Attention Skills
  • Follow Directions
  • Follow 2-step commands
  • Personal Care
  • Self-advocacy skills

Prerequisite skills

  • understand cause and effects
  • able to understand numbers
  • focus attention 1-5 minutes
  • Understand sequences

Objective: With modeling, student will be able to accurately read the thermometer

Time: 5 minnutes

Material: digital thermometer (best used for underarm and the mouth)

Steps:

  1. explain that a normal temperature reading is considered around 98.7 and temperature taking is done to determine if a person has a fever or is sick.
  2. The teaching method best used is through  modeling. Explain the steps to the individual and begin by taking your own temperature first.
  3. Once done, inform the individual he should do the same by using the following steps:
  • The student will pick up the thermometer
  • The student will wash the thermometer
  • The student will carefully place the tip of the thermometer under his/her tongue
  • With the mouth closed, the student will leave the thermometer in until he/she hears a beeping sound
  • The student will remove the thermometer
  • The student will accurately read the temperature.

You can also create a temperature log, where the individual takes their temperature on a daily basis and writes down their temperature on a chart.

10 Activities That Teach Money Skills

The following sites provide resources on teaching money skills. The links teach the critical skills including coin identification including skip counting and matching. Teaching a child or an adult with special needs money skills should include teaching in a multiple settings at appropriate times such as a grocery story, dry cleaners, and playing money games.

There are also good ideas on using functional materials to create money skill opportunities.

4 awesome games for teaching children money skills- Lemonade Day

5 best educational board games for money management– Money Crashers

7 board games that help teach kids about money– Amy Boyington

17 fun money activities for kids– Self-Sufficient Kids

50 fun ways to teach your kids about money– Policygenius

Interactive learning money games and exercise– Money Instructor.com

Money activities for kids– Education.com

Online games and apps that teach kids about money– Washington State Department of Financial Institutions

Online money games– math-play.com

Teaching coin counting strategies– Caffeine Queen Teacher

Cerebral Palsy Training PowerPoint

This blog article is an introduction to cerebral palsy. In the past, very few educational programs offered courses on specific information pertaining to disabilities. I am hopeful this is beginning to change.  Ions when I started working in the field, I felt that there was simply not enough information so I started to do my own research by reading books, journal articles and talking to both professionals and parents.

Here, I have included a short PowerPoint presentation on a brief introduction of Cerebral Palsy. The objectives include, the definition, prevalence and causes, types and the causes. This format can be used in various ways including a teaching course since most of us are currently learning online, or as a self-study course. Below,  you will find a quiz along with the quiz answers.

If you would like  to print out a copy of the PowerPoint, Download here: Cerebral Palsy PowerPoint

Download quiz test here: cerebral palsy QUIZ

Download quiz test answers here: cerebral palsy QUIZ answer

Free Money Skills Checklist

Creating money goals and objectives for children and adults with special needs should focus on building on skills that are already achieved. Money skills should be viewed as chronicle steps leading to advancing to independence.

Before starting a money goal activity or lesson plan, the  individual should have the ability to read and to write including knowing the letters of the alphabet .

Below you will find a money skills checklist that you can download and use to check when each skill level is achieved.

Download the free checklist here: money checklist