What is Tourette Syndrome?

According to the Tourette Association of America, tics are involuntary, repetitive movement and vocalizations. They are the defining feature of a group of childhood-onset, neurodevelopmental conditions known collectively as Tic disorders and individually as Tourette Syndrome.

Tics are common in childhood. The estimated prevalence of Tourette Syndrome disorder range from 3 to 8 per, 1,000 in school-aged children. Males are more commonly affected than females. Some people may have tic-free periods of weeks to months.

There are three types:
  1. Motor tics cause a movement including eye blinking, facial grimacing, jaw movements, and head bobbing
  2. Vocal/phonic tics produce a sound including throat clearing, grunting, hooting, and shouting
  3. Provisional tic disorders involve a person who experiences involuntary motor and/or verbal tics for one year.
Signs and Symptoms:

Tic Disorders:

  • eye blinking
  • coughing
  • throat clearing
  • sniffing
  • facial movement
  • shoulder shrugging

Vocal Tics:

  • barking or yelping
  • grunting
  • repeating what someone else says
  • shouting
  • sniffing
  • swearing
Co-Occurring Disorders Include:
  • Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)
  • Obsessive -Compulsive Disorder
  • Learning difficulties
  • Behavior problems
  • Anxiety
  • Mood problems
  • Sleeping issues
  • Social skills and deficits

 

Tourette Syndrome-It's not what you think it is » Movement ...

Risk Factors
  • Temperamental- it is worsened by anxiety, excitement and exhaustion.
  • Environmental- observing a gesture or sound in another person my result in an individual with a tic disorder making a similar sound.
  • Genetic- genetics and environmental factor influences tic symptoms.

Teaching Strategies for Students with Cerebral Palsy

Cerebral palsy is a motor disorder which results from damage to the brain occurring before, during and after birth. Cerebral palsy is the most common motor disability in childhood and it is estimated that 1 in 323 individuals have been identified with cerebral palsy.

Since cerebral palsy is the result of damage to the brain, it impacts each person differently ranging from severe to mild symptoms. It is estimated that many children with cerebral palsy also have at least one co-occurring condition. For instance, 41% had co-occurring epilepsy and 40% of children were diagnosed with an intellectual disability.

Teaching strategies should focus on assistive technology, fine and gross motor skills, and personal care. Accommodations and modifications should include providing extra time for task completion.

The following links provide information on teaching strategies.

Accommodating a student with cerebral palsy

Cerebral palsy in the classroom

How to make your classroom inclusive for students with cerebral palsy

How to teach children with cerebral palsy

Inclusive teaching strategies for students with cerebral palsy

Students with mild cerebral palsy in the classroom: Information and guidelines for teachers

What teachers should know about children with cerebral palsy

Teaching Strategies for Students with Orthopedic Impairments

The definition of orthopedic impairment under IDEA means a severe orthopedic impairment that adversely affects a child’s education performance. Causes include:

  • genetic
  • disease
  • injury
  • birth trauma
  • burns
  • fractures
  • cerebral palsy amputation

There are 3 classifications that an orthopedic impairment can fall under:

  1. Neuromotor impairment, this would include cerebral palsy, spinal cord injuries, spina bifida, and seizure disorders
  2. Degenerative Disease such as muscular dystrophy and Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome
  3. Musculoskeletal Disorders including scoliosis and deformed limbs.

Students with orthopedic impairments often qualify for therapy including physical and occupational therapy. assistive technology should be included for accommodating the students needs.

The following links provide resources on teaching assessment, modifications, and teaching information.

Orthopedic impairment: A guide for parents and teachers

Orthopedic impairment characteristics: Classroom modification and assistive technology

Orthopedic impairment and special needs students

Orthopedic impairment disability

Teaching strategies for mobility impaired students

Teaching strategies for orthopedic impairment

Teaching students with disabilities: Orthopedic impairment

Teaching students with orthopedic impairment

Understanding individuals with physical, health, and multiple disabilities

What is a Multiple Disability?

According to the Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA), multiple disabilities refers to simultaneous impairments such as intellectual-blindness, intellectual disability-orthopedic impairment. The combination of which causes such severe educational needs that cannot be accommodated in a special education program solely for one of the impairments, meaning a student has more than one or multiple impairments. According to the U.S. Department of Education, 2.0 percent of students currently are diagnosed with multiple disabilities.

The term multiple disability is a broad term and can include a number of disabilities. For example, a person diagnosed with cerebral palsy may also have a diagnosed of epilepsy, intellectual disability  and ADHD. The Center for Parent Information and Resources explains that from the term, your cannot tell how many disabilities a child has, which disabilities are involved or how severe each disabilities are involved or how severe each disability is. It is important to know the following in orde to support the child:

  • which individual disabilities are involved;
  • how severe (or moderate or mild) each disability is; and
  • how each disability can affect learning and daily living.

Support should include the following areas:

  • caring for oneself;
  • performing manual tasks;
  • seeing, hearing, eating, and sleeping;
  • walking, standing, lifting, and bending;
  • speaking and communicating;
  • breathing;
  • learning;
  • reading;
  • concentrating and thinking; and
  • working.
Resources

Parent Center Hub

What is Childhood Disintegrative Disorder?

Did you know that Childhood Disintegrative Disorder is  considered part of Autism Spectrum?

Childhood Disintegrative Disorder (CDD) is a condition where a child develops normally and achieves appropriate milestones up to the age of 4 and then begins to regress in both developmental and behavioral milestones and lose the skills they already learned. with a loss o skills plateauing around the age of 10.

Childhood Disintegrative Disorder is rare. It affects 1.7 in 100,000 and affects males at a higher rate than females. It is also known as Heller’s Syndrome and Disintegrative psychosis. The causes are unknown but may be linked to issues with the brain and nervous systems with some researchers suggesting it is some form of childhood dementia.

First discovered by Dr. Theodor Heller in 1908, Dr. Heller began publishing articles on his observation of children’s medical history in which he reported that in certain cases, children who were developing normally began to reverse at a certain age.

Signs and Symptoms

Children begin to show significant losses of earlier acquired skills in at least two of the following areas:

  • Lack of play
  • Loss of language or communication skills
  • Loss of social skills
  • Loss of bladder control
  • Lack of motor skills

The following characteristics also appear:

  • Social interaction
  • Communication
  • Repetitive interests or behaviors

Due to the small number of reported cases, it is included in the broad grouping of autism spectrum disorder in DSM-V under pervasive developmental disorder (PDD).  Although grouped with the autism spectrum disorder diagnosis, there are distinct differences. For example, children with CDD were more likely to be diagnosed with severe intellectual disability, epilepsy and long term impairment of behavior and cognitive functioning.

Resources

NCBI

Summit Medical Group

Teaching Visually Impaired Students

According to IDEA’s definition, visually impairment is defined as including blindness means an impairment in vision that, even with correction, adversely affects a child’s educational performance. The term includes both partial sight and blindness. There are 3 types of blindness including The types of vision impairments are low visual acuity, blindness, and legal blindness (which varies for each country): Low visual acuity, also known as moderate visual impairment, is a visual acuity between 20/70 and 20/400 with your best corrected vision, or a visual field of no more than 20 degrees.

The following articles and links provide resources on teaching students with visual impairments.

Teaching Strategies

The following are articles that provide tips and resources on teaching students with visual impairments.

10 tips for teaching blind or visually impaired students

Classroom strategies for regular education teachers who have students with visual impairments

General tips for teaching visually impaired students

How to teach a blind or visually impaired student

Inclusion teaching: Vision impairment and blindness

Teaching languages to blind and visually impaired students

Teaching strategies for vision impaired students

Teaching the blind and visually impaired

Strategies for helping children with visual impairments to develop listening skills

Visual impairment in the classroom

Teaching Activities

The following links provide activities that can used to teach students with visual impairments.

Adapting materials for visually impaired students

Create a restaurant book with tactile symbols

Durable braille flashcards

Tips and tools for teaching beginning braille skills

 

Early Intervention Training Resources

The following training resources are from the Center for Parent Information and Resources:

Key terms to know in early intervention– Parent Center Hub. 6-page pdf document

Identification of Children with Specific Learning Disabilities– reviews the process by which schools identify that a child has a specific learning disability

Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP)– the module includes 1 sideshow presentation, trainer’s guide, speakers notes and 2 handouts

Introduction to Procedural Safeguards- Part C of IDEA designed to protect the rights of parents and their infant or toddler.

The basics of early intervention– Includes a 64-page trainer’s guide in PDF or Word format

Screening, evaluation and assessment procedures– Module 4

Material and Resources from the CDC:

Autism Case Training– Web-based continuing education introductory course on autism.

Preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome-PDF format including resources on the topic

Specific Special Needs Topics:

Getting to know cerebral palsy- training resource in pdf format for facilitators

Supporting the student with Down syndrome in your classroom– created by Down Syndrome Association of West Michigan.

Global Development Delay Fact Sheet

Today is Global Developmental Delay Awareness Day. It is recognized the year on the first Friday during the month of May.

What is Global Developmental Delay (GDD)?

Global Developmental Delay is an umbrella term used when  children are significantly delayed in their cognitive and physical development and do not meet their developmental milestones in one or more of the development categories. the diagnoses is often used for children under the age of 5 years who are unable to meet benchmarks in intellectual functioning. It is also used when children are not diagnosed with a specific disorder of disability. There are some cased where children may be identified to have a disability however, the type of disability may not be known during the early onset of the disability.

Parents are typically the first to notice their child is not reaching milestones. as professionals, we should equally pay attention when children appear to be delayed in the area of motor, cognitive, speech and social and emotional development and bring it to the attention of parents so the child can be evaluated.

Click below to receive a free copy of the Global Developmental Delay Fact Sheet

Global Developmental Delay Fact Sheet

 

14 Virtual Field Trip Resources

Although most schools are closed and students and individuals are receiving lessons via online, field trips can still happen through virtual tours. Most places which offer group field trips, have created opportunities to still take a field trip through a virtual tour.

Some of the tours are offered through the websites while other sites have created tours through their facebook pages and YouTube channels.

You can also download lesson plans from the website on various activities.

Bronx Zoo

Great Wall of China

Indianapolis Zoo

J. Paul Getty Museum

Legoland

NASA Langley Research Center

National Museum of the United States

San Diego Zoo

Shedd Aquarium

Smithsonian National Zoo

The British Museum

The Louvre

Yellowstone National Park

Coloring and Tracing Activity

Did you know that the Easter bunny and Easter eggs dates back to the 18th century in the United States when Protestant German immigrants in the Pennsylvania Dutch area  brought the European folklore of the Easter bunny giving gifts of colored eggs to “good children” before Easter.

This activity is both a coloring and tracing activity focusing on strengthening fine motor skills of children and adults. Green was the color chosen since it is a spring color and also  helps to reinforce colors. Any shade of green will work in the color and additional colors should be added as well allowing for individual creativity.

Once completed the bunny can also be cut out and pasted on construction paper.

DOWNLOAD ACTIVITY BELOW:

color and tracing activity