Maternal Anxiety and Depression May Affect the Quality of Life of Children with Cerebral Palsy

Mother’s Anxiety or Depression Affects Her Child’s Quality of Life, Study Suggests
Source: Cerebral Palsy News Today

A new study suggests that maternal anxiety and depression may affect the quality of life of children with cerebral palsy (CP).

The study, “Impact of Symptoms of Maternal Anxiety and Depression on Quality of Life of children with Cerebral Palsy,” was recently published in the journal Archives of Neuropsychiatry.

CP is a leading cause of physical disability.  A heterogenous condition, it causes motor and sensory impairment, negatively affecting quality of life (QOL). However, that QOL in CP patients is multidimensional, and can be affected by other variables, including the person’s specific type of CP, cognitive function, and other medical disorders. Click here to read the rest of the story.

World Cerebral Palsy Day

Today is World Cerebral Palsy Day, not just a way to bring awareness, but to create a movement among people with cerebral palsy, their families and the organizations that support them.

Held in over 50 countries, World Cerebral Palsy (CP) Day is an opportunity for people to take action by creating a global movement for change.

What can you do?

The goal of World CP Day is to encourage people to take action in six-key areas:

  1. Public awareness- putting an end to ignorance and the stigma it can create.
  2. Civil rights- ensuring that government officials at the local, regional, and national level will take concrete action
  3. Medical/Therapeutic- ensuring the best information for diagnoses, prevention and treatment is available.
  4. Quality of Life- ensuring that people with cerebral palsy find enjoyment and fulfillment in life.
  5. Education- helping all educators provide an education to members of the cerebral palsy community
  6. Contribution- making sure each person has the ability to contribute to society.

Oh, and don’t forget to tweet using the hashtag #WorldCPDay

Resources

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What is cerebral palsy?- Infographic

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Cerebral Palsy Diagnosis and Treatment Infographic

Cerebral Palsy History Timeline

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), cerebral palsy is the most common motor disability in childhood. About I in 323 children are diagnosed each year. Although more than likely, cerebral palsy has been around for years, it was not until the 19th century that cerebral palsy was given a name. Here are some key events in cerebral palsy history.

cptimeline

1810- Dr. William John Little is credited with first identifying spastic diplegia is born.

1836- Louis Stromeyer corrects John Little’s club foot. This discovery begins a career in understanding and treating childhood impairments.

1843- Dr. William John Little begins lecturing on spastic ridgity.

1853. Dr. William John Little publishes On the Nature and Treatment of the Deformities of the Human Frame.

1861- Dr. William John Little establishes the classic definition of spastic cerebral palsy.

1889- William Osler, one of the founding professors of John Hopkins Hospital, wrote the book, Cerebral Palsies of Children

1937- Herbert A. Everest and Harry Jennings Sr., built a lightweight collapsible wheelchair.

1937- The Children’s Rehabilitation Insitute is founded by Dr. Winthrope Phelps specializing in children with cerebral palsy.

1897- Dr. Freud states cerebral palsy may be caused by fetal development

1946- Cerebral Palsy of New York State founded by parents of children with cerebral palsy.

1948- United Cerebral Palsy is incorporated.

1949- United Cerebral Palsy founded by Leonard Goldenson, his wife Isabel, Nina Eaton and Jack and Ethel Hausman.

2002-  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) conducts first U.S. multi-state study on the prevalence.

10 Speech Therapy Blogs You Should Be Reading

Speech therapy is a key component in the life of a child with a disability. When it comes to speech therapy, there are so many blogs that provide an abundance of resources for other speech therapist, teachers and parents. Finding the right ones however can be a challenge.

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The following blogs provide tons of information, resources and tips on speech language topics. Here are 10 speech therapy blogs worth checking out (in no particular order).

Beautiful Speech Life– Creates and develops therapy materials for fellow SLP’s and teachers. This website provides freebies, language materials and quick therapy tips.

Nicole Allison Speech Peeps– This website offers speech language resources on a variety of topics and an evidence-based intervention series.

PediaStaff– A resourceful blog providing informative news information and article blogs from speech language websites.

Simply Speech– A site with freebies and great blog ideas and activities

Speech 2 U- Provides resources, freebies and therapy topics on communication, social language, social language, organization, plus more!

Speechy Musing– Provides speech therapy resources on a variety of topics. Age range includes, birth to 3, elementary school and middle school on the subject of articulation, language and AAC; The site also includes a blog for fellow speech therapist.

Sublime Speech– Provides therapy to children with severe and profound disabilities. Website includes information on apps, articulation, language, materials and social skills

Teach Speech 365. Includes freebies, giveaways and therapy topics.

The Dabbling Speechie– A website for speech and language pathologist and parents offering a variety of resources on articulation, language and social skills.

The Speech Room News– Specializing in pediatric speech and language therapy, Jenna’s site provides resources for speech language pathologists and educators. The website includes free resources, and treatment topics on articulation, social language, preschool and more.

 

26 Great Resources on Special Needs Clothing

Children and adults with disabilities with sensory issues, autism, ADHD, down syndrome and cerebral palsy often find challenges in finding clothing that meets the need of feeling good and appropriate.

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Challenges may also include difficulties in handling buttons and closures. Here are 25 resources that focus on shoes, outerwear, and adaptive clothing.

Adaptive Clothing

Adaptations By Adrian- Adaptive clothing including side zippers, wide band elastic waist for custom-made capes, wheelchair, pants, shorts adult protectors and cape protecting scarf.

CAPR-Style– Located in the U.K, adaptive clothing for adults and children including feeding tube covers.

Designed By Dignity– Adaptive clothing fashion clothes for men and women.

Down Design Dream– Adapting Clothing for children and adults with special needs

Easy Access Clothing– Adaptive clothing for adults and children.

Professional Fit Clothing– Adaptive clothing for adults and children including adults bibs, clothing protectors and nightware.

Rackety’s- Based in the U.K, products include adaptive clothing for children and adults such as vests, outdoor clothing, and nightwear.

Something Sew Special– Handmade adaptive clothing for children with special needs including bibs, ponchos, bodysuits and bandanas.

Special Kids Companywhere every child should be seen and not hidden!  International provider of bodysuits for older children with special needs including PEG/tube fed children aged 2-14 years old.  Available on all Amazon platforms (.com/.ca/.co.uk/.fr/.de/.es/.it)

Specially For You Inc.– Custom clothing for children with physical disabilities. Products include night wear, dresses, tops, one piece outfits and hooded poncho’s.

Tender Ivy– Onesie garment designed for protecting vulnerable areas.

Wonsie– Based in Australia, products include special needs onesie bodysuits for older children and adults.

Sensory Clothing

Children and adults with sensory processing issues may find it difficult wearing certain types of clothing. The following stores sell items that are for sensitive skin, medically fragile and pressure points.

Cool Vest– products includes children’s cooling vest.

Independent You– Adaptive outerwear, sportswear and sleepwear.

Kozie Clothes– Adaptive medical and sensory clothing for medically fragile and special needs babies and children.

No Netz– Anti-chafe swimwear for boys and men.

SmartKnit Kids– Seamless products for children with sensory issues. Products include, socks, undies, tees and bralettes.

World’s Softest– Socks for sensitive skin

Shoes for AFO’s

The following are stores that sell shoes that fit over orthotics.

Ablegaitor- Orthopedic shoes for children. Can be used without AFO’s.

Hatchbacks– Children’s orthopedic shoes for use with orthotics.

Healthy Feet Store– An online orthopedic shoe and footcare store including AFO’s accommodations.

Keeping Pace– Children’s orthopedic footwear designed for AFO’s.

Shoby Shoes– Custom-made orthopedic shoes and support boots for special needs children

Soft Star Shoes– Will customize shoes to work wit AFO’s and DAFO’s.

Coats for Wheelchairs

Coats for individuals who use wheelchairs  made need special clothing. The following online stores, specialize in adaptive outerwear for children and adults.

Koolway Sports– Based in Ontario, Canada, Koolway Sports items include blankets, hoods, and capes.

Silvert’s– Adaptive clothing for men and women including footwear and wheelchair clothing.

Weighted Vest

Weighed vest can be used for children and adults with autism, ADHD, Cerebral Palsy, Muscular Dystrophy and a sensory processing disorder.

e-Special Needs– provides a selection of weighted vests and clothing

Fun and Function– Includes items such as explorers vest, fleece hoodies and compression vests.

Intellectual Disability

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What is an Intellectual Disability?

DSM-V defines intellectual disability as a disorder with onset during the developmental period that includes both intellectual functioning including abstract thinking, judgment, academic learning, problem solving.  Adaptive functioning including limitations in activities of daily living, communication, social participation, and independent living across multiple environments such as home, school, work and community. Deficits are on the onset during the developmental period.

According the American Association on Intellectual Disabilities (AAIDD), Intellectual Functioning refers to general mental capacity such as, learning, reasoning and problem-solving.

Types

Although historically, the levels of severity was based on I.Q. scores, this has changed to adaptive functioning which determines the levels of support required.

Mild
  • Social Domain- There may be difficulties in regulating emotions and behaviors in an age-appropriate manner. There tends to be a limited understanding of calculated risk, and social judgment.
  • Practical Domain- May need assistance in independent living skills such as grocery shopping, transportation, banking and food preparation.
Moderate
  • Social Domain: Capacity for relationships is evident in ties to family and friends and may have successful friendships across life and sometimes relationships in adulthood.
  • Practical Domain: Can care for personal needs involving eating, dressing and hygiene and as an adult participate in all household task.
Severe
  • Social Doman: Spoken language is limited. Speech may be ingle words or phrases. The individual understands simple speech.
  • Practical Domain: Requires support for all activities of daily living, including meals, dressing and bathing. The person will require supervision at all times. Unable to make responsible decisions regarding self-care.
Profound
  • Social Domain: Has limited understanding of symbolic communication in speech and gestures. The person expresses his or her own desires and emotions through non-verbal communication.
  • Practical Domain: The child or adult is dependent on other people for basic needs including self-care and independent living including health and safety.
Global Developmental Delay

Children under the age of 5 are given this diagnosis when an individual fails to meet expected developmental milestones in several areas of intellectual functioning. This includes children who may be too young to participate in standardized testing.

Causes

Causes can include:

  • Complications during childbirth
  • Problems after birth
  • Chromosomal (Down syndrome, Fragile X syndrome)
  • Metabolic
  • Nutritional
  • Genetic
  • Poverty and cultural factors

Prevalence

  • Approximately 1% of the world population
  • Prevalence for severe intellectual disability is 6 per 100
  • In the United States, Intellectual disability comprises of 3 percent of the general population
  • Nationally, 34% of people with intellectual disability are employed
  • Males are more likely than females to be diagnoses with both mild and severe

 

December Special Needs Article Links

Welcome to the December article links and resources. These are articles that I  tweeted during the month of December on special needs and developmental disability topics. I tweet articles and links everyday. Please make sure you follow me and I will follow you back!

  1. Teen with autism films bullying using a selfie stick-Metro
  2. Best books about autism– andnextcomesL (Blog)
  3. Parents of special needs children need special care too– marcilebowitz.com
  4. What my son’s dyspraxia taught me about his autism-Huffpost
  5. These start-ups are helping people with autism find work– thenextweb.com
  6. Siblings without autism face challenges at school-Spectrum
  7. Common signs of sensory processing disorder-Sensory World
  8. Mall santa goes the extra mile for boy with autism-Autism Speaks
  9. The basic things to know about sensory processing disorder-Therama
  10. Helping kids with ADHD manage screen time-Understood
  11. New statistics about ADHD are scary-Twahod Voice
  12. 10 Inspiring quotes from people with autism-Autism Speaks
  13. 10 ways to support your child with autism through their teens and beyond-Autism Speaks
  14. Why I love knowing I have high-functioning autism– The Telegraph
  15. Cerebral palsy in adults increases risk of asthma, hypertension and arthritis -Bel Marra Health
  16. Do sensory issues look different in teens and adults? – Integrated Learning Strategies
  17. 5 core principles of time management-Coaching Positive Performance
  18. Why kids with executive functioning issues have trouble starting task-Understood
  19. Study: Why males are at a higher risk of autism-NDTV
  20. 10 things medics need to know about your autism-Autism Parenting Magazine
  21. How to help your aspie learn social skills: The 6 P’s to social skills coaching for parents-Autism Parenting Magazine
  22. 4 strategies for accommodating students with dyslexia– Think Inclusive
  23. How to deal with obsessive and repetitive services-Durham Region Autism Services
  24. Why believing in your autistic child’s abilities make all the difference-HuffPost
  25. Genetic abnormality may explain health complications of down syndrome-Medline Plus

 

Happy Holidays!

 

HAPPY HOLIDAYS2015

Special Needs Resource Blog will take a break during the holidays and will return Monday, January 4, 2016 with new information, tools and resources to post including more downloadable free tools and templates Monday thru Thursday. I am excited and look forward to sharing more resources with you in the new year.
Thanks to all of you for following my blog this year. Wishing you and your families joy and peace all through the holidays and throughout the new year. May the spirit of the holidays be with you throughout the new year.  🙂   🙂

 

Thanksgiving and Mealtime Precautions

mealtime_thanksgiving_logo

Thanksgiving is the day set aside in the United States and Canada as a day of pausing to reflect all that we are thankful for by connecting with friends and family over good food. It is also the day of taking special precautions when serving people with developmental disabilities.

Aspiration is a huge risk during the holiday season. Factors that place people at risk for aspiration includes the following:

  • Being fed by someone else
  • Poor chewing or swallowing skills
  • Weak or absent coughing/gagging reflexes which is common in people with cerebral palsy or muscular dystrophy
  • Eating to quickly
  • Inappropriate fluid consistency
  • Inappropriate food texture

For children and adults with autism, Thanksgiving may be a challenge for a variety of reasons:

  • Sensory and emotional overload with large groups
  • Picky eaters
  • Difficulty with various textures of food

To help you mange Thanksgiving with ease, click on the articles below:

8 tips for managing Thanksgiving with children with autism

Autism and Thanksgiving: How to cope with the feasting and hubbub

Feeding kids with sensory processing disorders

Preparing for Thanksgiving on the autism spectrum

Swallowing problems? What to do about Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving dinner ideas for speech therapy activities

Tips for Navigating Thanksgiving on the Spectrum

 

 

World Cerebral Palsy Day

world CP Day 2015

Today is World Cerebral Palsy Day, not just a way to bring awareness, but to create a movement among people with cerebral palsy, their families and the organizations that support them.

Held in over 50 countries, World Cerebral Palsy (CP) Day is an opportunity for people to take action by creating a global movement for change.

What can you do?

The goal of World CP Day is to encourage people to take action in six-key areas:

  1. Public awareness- putting an end to ignorance and the stigma it can create.
  2. Civil rights- ensuring that government officials at the local, regional, and national level will take concrete action
  3. Medical/Therapeutic- ensuring the best information for diagnoses, prevention and treatment is available.
  4. Quality of Life- ensuring that people with cerebral palsy find enjoyment and fulfillment in life.
  5. Education- helping all educators provide an education to members of the cerebral palsy community
  6. Contribution- making sure each person has the ability to contribute to society.

Oh, and don’t forget to tweet using the hashtag #WorldCPDay