10 Passover Craft Activities

Passover,m also known as Pesach is the Jewish festival celebrating the exodus of the Israelite’s from Egyptian slavery. There are craft ideas in the link below that are fun as well as improving fine motor skills including writing, cutting, gluing, painting and buttoning.

Other skills developed from these activities include attention to task, following directions, following two- step commands, and listening.

8 fun crafts to get kids ready for Passover

8 Passover activities to do with your kids

9 great Passover crafts

10 kid friendly crafts for Passover

15 DIY Passover Seder plates your kids will love to make

15 Passover games and activities

Passover activity pages for kids

Passover crafts for kids

Passover teacher resources

Planning a child-friendly Seder

Teaching Counting to Special Needs Students

Teaching individuals to count is an early prerequisite to working on money skills. Before starting to work on a counting goals, students should be able to count numbers 1- 100. Make sure to break any counting activities into short, easy-to-manage steps and provide clear expectations.

6 methods for teaching money counting-Thought Co.

7 ways to teaching counting to 100- Raising Da Vinci

10 tips to teach numbers and alphabets to children with autism– The Learning App

Counting Strategies– National Council of Teachers of Mathematics

Easy way to teach preschool children to count– VeryWell

Math: Counting and Comparing– The Yale Center for Dyslexia and Creativity

Skip Counting for Autism– Autism Educators

Teaching Counting- The Autism Helper

Teaching Counting Skills– The Autism Helper

Teaching Counting– National Center on Intensive Intervention

10 Valentine’s Day Fine Motor Activites

Here are some fun fine motor activities to do with your students. Children and adults with special needs often face challenges with coordination of the small muscles that affect writing, and grasping objects. These activities will help students both strengthen and maintain abilities in fine motor control and dexterity. For these activities, you will need the following supplies:

  • scissors
  • construction paper
  • glue or paste

50 Easy Valentine’s Day Crafts and Activities- From the Thrifty Kiwi

Brain-Building Valentines Activities– From Integrated Learning Strategies

Heart Bunny Rabbit Craft– From Crafty Morning

Valentine’s Day Fine Motor Activity– From No Time For Flash Cards

Valentine’s Day Fine Motor Activity– From The Resourceful Mama

Valentine’s Day Fine Motor Activity for Preschool– From Pre-K Pages

Valentine’s Day Fine Motor Sparkle Craft –  From The OT Toolbox

Valentine’s Day Tree Paper Craft– From Housing a Forest

Valentine’s Day Scissor Cutting Practice Tray– From I heart Crafty Things

Valentine Heart ORCA Whale Craft- From Crafty Morning

It’s hard to imagine a time when children with disabilities did not have access or the rights to an equal education as those students without disabilities. Prior to 1975, many children with disabilities were living in large institutions or went to private schools.

President Gerald Ford signed into the Education For All Handicapped Children Act (Pubic Law-94-142) now knowns as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). The purpose of IDEA is to protect the rights of infants, toddlers, children and youth with disabilities and to provide equal access to children for children with disabilities. The following list describes the 13 categories of IDEA eligibility including the definition below:

A child with a disability is defined as a child evaluated as having an intellectual disability, hearing impairment (including deafness), a speech or language impairment, visual impairment (including blindness), a serious emotional disturbance, an orthopedic impairment, autism, traumatic brain injury, an other health impairment, a specific learning disability, deaf-blindness, or multiple disabilities who need special education and related services.

  1. Autism means developmental disability significantly affecting verbal and nonverbal communication and social integration, generally evident before age 3, that adversely affect a child’s educational performance. Other characteristics often associated with autism are engagement in repetitive activities and stereotyped movements, resistance to environmental change or change in daily routines, and unusual responses to sensory experiences.
  2. Deaf-blindness- defined as having both visual and hearing impairments. The combination of which causes such severe communication and other developmental and education needs that they cannot be accommodated in special education programs.
  3. Deafness- a hearing impairment that is so severe that the child is impaired in processing linguistic information through hearing, or with or without amplification, that adversely affects a child educational performance.
  4. Emotional disturbance- a condition exhibiting one or more of the following characteristics over a long period of time
  5. Hearing impairment- an impairment in hearing, whether permanent or fluctuating that adversely affects a child’s performance but that is not included under the definition of deafness.
  6. Intellectual disability- significantly lower general intellectual functioning, existing concurrently with deficits in adaptive behavior and manifested during the developmental period, that adversely affect a child’s educational performance.
  7. Multiple disabilities- A combination of impairments (such as intellectual disability-blindness or intellectual disability-orthopedic impairment). The combination causes severe educational needs that they cannot be accomplished in special education program solely for one of the impairments.
  8. Orthopedic impairment- a severe orthopedic impairment that adversely affects a child’s educational performance. The term includes impairments caused by a congenital anomaly, impairments caused by diseases (e.g. Poliomyelitis) and impairment causes (e.g. cerebral palsy, amputations, and fractures or burns that cause contractures)
  9. Other health impairments- having limited strength, vitality, or alertness including a heightened alertness to environmental stimuli that results in limited alertness with respect to the educational environment that is due to chronic or acute health problems such as asthma, ADHD, diabetes, epilepsy, heart condition, sickle cell anemia and Tourette syndrome which adversely affects a child’s education performance.
  10. Specific learning  disability- a disorder in  one or more of the basic psychological processes involved in understanding or in using language spoken or written that may manifest itself in the imperfect ability to listen, think, speak, read, write, spell or to do mathematical calculations including conditions such as perceptual disabilities, brain injury, dyslexia and developmental aphasia.
  11. Speech or language impairment- a communication disorder such as stuttering impaired articulation, a language impairment, or a voice impairment that adversely affects a child’s educational performance.
  12. Traumatic brain injury- An acquired injury to the brain caused by an external physical force, resulting in total or partial functional disability or psychosocial impairment or both. Traumatic brain injury applies to open or closed head injuries resulting in impairments in one or more areas, such as cognition, language, memory, attention, reasoning, abstract thinking, judgement, problem-solving, sensory, perceptual motor abilities and information processing and speech.
  13. Visual impairment including blindness- an impairment in vision that, even with correction, adversely affects a child’s educational performance. The term includes both partial sight and blindness.

DIY Sensory Activities for your Child With Autism

Dysfunctional sensory system is a common Symptom of Autism as well as other developmental disabilities. In this, sometimes one or more senses can either be hypo or hyper sensitive to stimulation and can lead to behaviors like rocking, spinning, and hand- flapping, irritability and hyperactivity.

There are three basic senses that are critical for our survival- tactile, vestibular, and proprioceptive. Sensory Integration techniques or therapies of these senses can facilitate attention and awareness, and reduce overall arousal.

In this article, each of these sensory systems will be covered. There also will be a Do-it-yourself (DIY) activity mentioned to overcome dysfunction and improve functioning of these sensory systems. Click here to read the rest of the story.

Free Printable Money WorkSheets

Summer will be here before you know it. If you want your student/ child or individual to continue practicing math skills, I have provided below 4 money sheets that you can printout and make several copies. The money sheets allows the child to work on both IEP and ISP goals including:

  1. Identifying coins
  2. Matching coins
  3. Visual discrimination
  4. Counting
  5. Transition skills
  6. Visual learners

 

Burger King.Worksheet. This is a fun activity especially for children, students and adults that enjoy going to Burger King. The individual will choose the picture and subject the cost of the item from $10.00.  This activity people with dysgraphia, increase money skills, attention skills, task initiation skills and works well as a pre-trip to Burger King. focusing on transition skills.

Matching Dimes Worksheet– The matching dime activity is great for goals on counting and identifying a time. it is useful for children adults that are visual learners and provides hands on materials. The students learning ability will increase with the use of actual dimes.

Circle Nickle Worksheet – This worksheet give the individual an opportunity to work on counting, identify various coins as well as explaining the value of the coin. The worksheet also provides additional support and increases visual discrimination skills.

Dime Counting – helps the child, student or adult with special needs practice counting skills and visual memory.

My plan for the rest of the year is to provide you with more resources that are more functional and allows you to download information.

 

15 Teaching Strategy Resources for Students With Hearing Impairments

 

Accommodations for students with hearing loss

Five tips for teachers of students with hearing impairments

How to teach hearing impaired students: Strategies for success

Inclusive teaching: deaf and hearing impaired

Instructional strategies for students who are deaf or hard of hearing

Modern teaching techniques for deaf and hard of hearing students

Strategies for hearing impaired students

Suggested teaching strategies

Teaching a child with hearing loss

Teaching hearing impaired children

Teaching strategies for deaf and hearing impaired

Teaching strategies for hearing impaired students

Tips for teachers

Tips for teaching a preschooler with hearing loss

Visual teaching strategies for students who are deaf or hard of hearing

Resources For Teaching Sequencing Skills

Sequence is defined as a set of related events, movements, or things that follow each other in a particular order. For many children and adults with developmental delays and disabilities, the ability to arrange thoughts, information and language may be a challenge due to issues with their executive function capabilities. The following resources, tips and strategies will help you teach sequencing skills.

How to teach sequencing skills at home

How to teach sequencing skills to children

How to teach sequencing to preschool children

Sequencing activities for students with autism

Sequencing skills teaching strategies 

Story sequence strategies

Strategies for teaching your child sequencing skills

Teaching sequencing skills

The importance of sequencing skills in a child’s development

Tips to teach sequencing skills in children

Matching Tasks Activities

Matching task activities provide children with special needs an opportunity to learn in a fun, interactive way. Matching activities provide the opportunity for children and adults to master a skill through repetition and leads to higher learning. Matching and sorting helps to strengthen memory and identify the relationship between two or more items. Below are links to worksheets and matching activities.

All words-to-pictures matching worksheets

Color matching activity

DIY kids emotion matching game

Match the number activity worksheets

Matching activities supporting reading development

Matching animals to pictures

Matching colors when you only have a minute

Matching words to pictures

Rainbow bear color matching spinner game

Teaching preschoolers to mix and match

Understanding The Individualized Family Service (IFSP)

The individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP) is a written plan that is developed for infant and toddlers up to the age of 3. It is Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Act responsible for developing and implementing statewide early intervention services for infants and toddlers with disabilities and their families.

The difference between IFSP and an IEP, is that ISFP is written plan designed for the family while the IEP focus is the student. ISFP should include the following information:

  • Your child’s level of functioning and needs
  • Outcomes expected
  • Family information Natural environment
  • Where your child receives services
  • Number of sessions your child will receive for the service
  • Who will pay for the service

Services provided through early intervention based on your child’s needs include:

  • Audiological services
  • Vision services
  • Occupational and physical therapy
  • Special education service
  • Speech and language therapy
  • Medical and nursing service
  • Nutritional services
  • Psychological and social work services
  • Health services necessary for your child to benefit from other early intervention services
  • Family training, counseling, and home visits
  • Transportation to enable your child and family to receive early intervention services
  • Respite care and other family support services
Team Members

Individualized family service plan team members include:

  • Evaluator
  • Therapist
  • Service Coordinator
  • Parent or caregiver
  • Other family members
  • An advocate if requested by the parents

A service coordinator is provided to assist and enable an infant or a toddler with a disability and the family to receive services. The service coordinator also:

  • Coordinates early intervention services and other services
  • Facilitates and participates in the development, and evaluation of the plan
  • Ensures services are provided in a timely manner
  • Facilitate the development of a transition plan to preschool, or to other services.
Resources

Center for Parent Information and Resources

Family Connect

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