Teaching Strategies for Individuals with Multiple Disabilities

 

Evidence based practices for students with severe disabilities 

Instructional strategies for students with multiple disabilities

Multiple disabilities in your classroom: 10 tips for teachers

Severe and education of individuals with multiple disabilities

Strategies for inclusion of children with multiple disabilities including deaf-blindness

Students who are blind or visually impaired with multiple disabilities

Students with multiple disabilities

Supporting young children with multiple disabilities: What do we know and what do we still need to learn?

Teaching students with multiple disabilities

Teaching students with severe or multiple disabilities

Intellectual Disability Resource Page

Definition:

Developmental disability is a diverse group of chronic conditions that are due to mental or physical impairments before the age of 22. A developmental disability can occur before, during or after birth. Common well-known developmental disabilities include autism, Down syndrome, cerebral palsy and Fragile X syndrome. Here are some facts and statistics on developmental disabilities.

Awareness Day: None

Awareness Month: March

Ribbon: Blue/Silver

Prevalence:

  • Developmental Disability is a severe, long-term disability that affect cognitive ability, physical functioning or both.
  • 1 in 6 or about 15% of children aged 3 through 17 have one or more developmental disabilities.
  • Between 2014 and 2016 the prevalence of developmental disability among kids ages 3 to 17 increased from 5.76 percent to 6.99 percent.
  • Prevalence of autism increased 289.5%
  • Prevalence of ADHD increased 33.0 %
  • Males have a higher prevalence of ADHD, autism, learning disabilities, stuttering and other developmental disabilities.
  • Children from families with incomes below the federal poverty level had a higher prevalence of developmental disabilities.
  • 10% of Americans have a family member with an intellectual disability.
  • Intellectual disabilities are 25 times more common than blindness.
  • Every year 125,000 children are born with an intellectual disability
  • Approximately 85% of the intellectual disability is in the mild category.
  • About 10% of the intellectual disability is considered moderate
  • About 3-4% of the intellectual disability population is severe.
  • Only 1-2% is classified as profound.

Article

15 Facts About Cri Du Chat Syndrome

20 Facts You Should Know About Down Syndrome

Dementia and Intellectual Disabilities

Early Signs of Rett Syndrome

Intellectual Disability and Epilepsy

What is Lowe Syndrome?

What is Prader Willi Syndrome?

What is Turner Syndrome?

University Centers on Disabilities Resources

Are you familiar with the Association of University Centers on Disabilities? It is a program The Association of University Centers on Disabilities (AUCD) is a membership organization that supports and promotes a national network of university-based interdisciplinary programs. Network members consist of:

  • 67 University Centers for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (UCEDD), funded by the Office on Intellectual Developmental Disabilities (OIDD)
  • 52 Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities (LEND) Programs funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB)
  • 14 Intellectual and Developmental Disability Research Centers (IDDRC), most of which are funded by the National Institute for Child Health and Development (NICHD)

These programs serve and are located in every U.S. state and territory and are all part of universities or medical centers. They serve as a bridge between the university and the community, bringing together the resources of both to achieve meaningful change.

AUCD supports this national network through:

  • Leadership on major social problems affecting all people living with developmental or other disabilities or special health needs
  • Advocacy with Congress and executive branch agencies that fund and regulate programs used by people with disabilities
  • Networking and partnering with other national organizations to advance the network’s national agendas
  • Promoting communication within the network and with other groups by collecting, organizing, and disseminating data on network activities and accomplishments
  • Technical assistance provision on a broad range of topics

The following are Networks located in each State:

Alabama

The University of Alabama at Birmingham
933 19th Street South, CH19 Room 307(Location)
1720 2nd Avenue South, CH19 Room 307 (Mailing)
Birmingham, AL 35294-0021
Main Phone:  205-934-5471
Toll Free Number:  800-822-2472
Main Fax:  205-975-2380
Main Email:  fbiasini@uab.edu
Website:  www.uab.edu/civitansparks

Alaska

UCEDD,LEND Program:
Center for Human Development
University of Alaska Anchorage
2702 Gambell Street
Suite 103
Anchorage, AK 99503
Main Phone:  907-272-8270
Main Fax:  907-274-4802
Website:  http://www.alaskachd.org

Arizona

Arizona UCEDD
Northern Arizona University
Institute for Human Development
912 Riordan Ranch Road
PO Box 5630
Flagstaff, AZ 86011-5630
Main Phone:  928-523-7921
Main Fax:  928-523-9127
TTY:  928-523-1695
Website:  http://www.nau.edu/ihd/

Arkansas 

Partners for Inclusive Communities
University of Arkansas at Fayetteville
322 Main. Suite 501
Little Rock, AR 72201
Main Phone:  501-301-1100
Toll Free Number:  800-342-2923
Main Fax:  501-682-5423
TTY:  800-342-2923
Main Email:  partners@uark.edu
Website:  http://UofAPartners.uark.edu

California

UCEDD Program:
USC UCEDD at the Children’s Hospital Los Angeles
Children’s Hospital Los Angeles
University of Southern California
4650 Sunset Boulevard
Mailstop #53
Los Angeles, CA 90027-6062
Main Phone:  323-361-2300
Main Fax:  323-361-8305
Main Email:  uscucedd@chla.usc.edu
Website:  http://www.uscucedd.org
AUCD State Profile: AUCD CA State Profile

Colorado 

JFK Partners
University of Colorado Denver
School of Medicine
13121 E. 17th Ave, C234
Aurora, CO 80045
Main Phone:  303-724-5266
Main Fax:  303-724-7664
Website:  http://www.jfkpartners.org

Connecticut

UConn Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities
University of Connecticut A.J. Pappanikou Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities
263 Farmington Ave., MC 6222
Farmington, CT 06030-6222
Main Phone:  860-679-1500
Toll Free Number:  866-623-1315
Main Fax:  860-679-1571
TTY:  860-679-1502
Main Email:  bruder@uchc.edu
Website:  http://www.uconnucedd.org

Delaware

Center for Disabilities Studies
College of Education and Human Development
University of Delaware
461 Wyoming Road
Newark, DE 19716
Main Phone:  302-831-6974
Main Fax:  302-831-4690
TTY:  302-831-4689
Main Email:  mineo@udel.edu
Website:  http://www.udel.edu/cds

District of Columbia 

Georgetown UCEDD
Georgetown University
Center for Child and Human Development
3300 Whitehaven Street, NW, Suite 3300
Mailing address Box 571485
Washington, DC 20057-1485
Main Phone:  202-687-8807
Main Fax:  202-687-8899
TTY:  202-687-5503
Website:  https://ucedd.georgetown.edu/
Website 2:  https://gucchd.georgetown.edu/
Twitter:  https://twitter.com/GUUCEDD
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/GUUCEDD/

Florida

UCEDD,LEND Program:
Mailman Center for Child Development
University of Miami Miller School of Medicine
Department of Pediatrics
Department of Pediatrics (D-820)
P.O. Box 016820
Miami, FL 33101
Main Phone:  305-243-6801
Main Fax:  305-243-5978
Main Email:  darmstrong@med.miami.edu
Website:  http://mailmancenter.org
AUCD State Profile: AUCD FL State Profile.pdf

Georgia

Institute on Human Development and Disability
A University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities Education, Research, and Service
College of Family and Consumer Sciences
River’s Crossing Building, The University of Georgia
850 College Station Road
Athens, GA 30602-4806
Main Phone:  706-542-3457
Main Fax:  706-542-4815
Main Email:  contact@ihdd.uga.edu
Website:  http://www.ihdd.uga.edu

Hawaii

Pacific Basin Program
University of Hawaii, Center on Disability Studies
1410 Lower Campus Road, #171F
Honolulu, HI 96822
Main Phone:  808-956-2303
Main Fax:  808-956-7878
Main Email:  kiriko@hawaii.edu
Website:  www.hawaii.edu/cds

Idaho 

Idaho Center on Disabilities and Human Development
College of Education, Health and Human Sciences
1187 Alturas Drive
Moscow, ID 83843
Main Phone:  208-885-6000
Main Fax:  208-885-6145
TTY:  800-432-8324
Main Email:  idahocdhd@uidaho.edu
Website:  http://www.idahocdhd.org
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/Idahocdhd/

Illinois 

University of Illinois UCE
Institute on Disability and Human Development (M/C 626)
Department of Disability and Human Development
The University of Illinois at Chicago
1640 West Roosevelt Road
Chicago, IL 60608-6904
Main Phone:  312-413-1647
Main Fax:  312-413-4098
TTY:  312-413-0453
Website:  http://ahs.uic.edu/disability-human-development/
Website 2:  http://go.uic.edu/DHD
Twitter:  https://twitter.com/idhd_uic
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/UICDHD/

Indiana 

Indiana Institute on Disability and Community
Indiana University
2810 East Discovery Parkway
Bloomington, IN 47408
Main Phone:  812-855-6508
Main Fax:  812-855-9630
Main Email:  iidc@indiana.edu
Website:  http://www.iidc.indiana.edu
Twitter:  https://twitter.com/IIDCIU
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/pages/Indiana-Institute-on-Disability-and-Community-at-Indiana-University/71615188471

Iowa

UCEDD,LEND Program:
Iowa’s University Center for Excellence in Disabilities
Center for Disabilities and Development
100 Hawkins Drive
Iowa City, IA 52242-1011
Main Phone:  319-384-5656
Main Fax:  319-356-8284
Main Email:  meredith-field@uiowa.edu
Website:  https://uihc.org/ucedd/
Website 2:  https://uihc.org/ucedd/iowa-leadership-education-neurodevelopmental-and-related-disabilities-project

Kansas 

Kansas University Center on Developmental Disabilities
University of Kansas
Schiefelbusch Institute for Life Span Studies
1200 Sunnyside Avenue
3111 Haworth
Lawrence, KS 66045-7534
Main Phone:  785-864-7600
Main Fax:  785-864-7605
Main Email:  kucdd@ku.edu
Website:  http://www.kucdd.org
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/ksucdd/?ref=aymt_homepage_panel

Kentucky

University of Kentucky Human Development Institute
University Center on Disability
University of Kentucky
126 Mineral Industries Building
Lexington, KY 40506-0051
Main Phone:  859-257-1714
Main Fax:  859-323-1901
TTY:  859-257-2903
Website:  http://www.hdi.uky.edu
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/ukhdi/

Louisiana

LSUHSC – Human Development Center
LSUHSC – Human Development Center
School of Allied Health Professions
411 So. Prieur Street – 4th Floor Room 472
New Orleans, LA 70112-2262
Main Phone:  504-556-7585
Main Fax:  504-556-7574
Website:  http://www.hdc.lsuhsc.edu

Maine

University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities
The University of Maine
Center for Community Inclusion and Disability Studies
5717 Corbett Hall
Orono, ME 04469-5717
Main Phone:  207-581-1084
Toll Free Number:  800-203-6957
Main Fax:  207-581-1231
TTY:  800-203-6957
Main Email:  CCIDSMAIL@maine.edu
Website:  http://www.ccids.umaine.edu

Maryland

Maryland Center for Developmental Disabilities
Kennedy Krieger Institute
7000 Tudsbury Road
Gwynn Oak, MD 21244
Main Phone:  443-923-9555
Toll Free Number:  888-554-2080
Main Fax:  443-923-9570
TTY:  443-923-2645
Website:  http://www.kennedykrieger.org/community/maryland-center-developmental-disabilities

Massachusetts 

Institute for Community Inclusion/ UCEDD
University of Massachusetts Boston
100 Morrissey Blvd.
Boston, MA 02125
Main Phone:  617-287-4300
Main Fax:  617-287-4352
TTY:  617-287-4350
Main Email:  ici@umb.edu
Website:  http://www.communityinclusion.org

Michigan 

Michigan Developmental Disabilities Institute (MI-DDI)
Wayne State University
4809 Woodward Avenue
268 Leonard N. Simons Building
Detroit, MI 48202
Main Phone:  313-577-2654
Toll Free Number:  888-978-4334
Main Fax:  313-577-3770
TTY:  313-577-2654
Main Email:  middi@wayne.edu
Website:  http://ddi.wayne.edu
Twitter:  https://twitter.com/DDIatWSU
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/MIDDIatWSU/

Minnesota 

Institute on Community Integration
University of Minnesota
College of Education and Human Development
102 Pattee Hall
150 Pillsbury Drive SE
Minneapolis, MN 55455-0223
Main Phone:  612-624-6300
Main Fax:  612-624-9344
Main Email:  ici@umn.edu
Website:  http://ici.umn.edu
Website 2:  http://lend.umn.edu
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/InstituteonCommunityIntegration/

Mississippi 

Institute for Disability Studies: Mississippi’s UCEDD
The University of Southern Mississippi
118 College Drive #5163
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001
Main Phone:  601-266-5163
Toll Free Number:  888-671-0051
Main Fax:  601-266-5114
TTY:  888-671-0051
Main Email:  Rebekah.Young@usm.edu
Website:  https://www.usm.edu/ids/
AUCD State Profile: Institute for Disability Studies FY 2019 Report Card

Missouri 

UMKC Institute for Human Development (UCE)
215 W. Pershing
6th Floor
Kansas City, MO 64108
Main Phone:  816-235-1770
Main Fax:  816-235-1762
TTY:  800-452-1185
Main Email:  reigharda@umkc.edu
Website:  http://www.ihd.umkc.edu

Montana

The Rural Institute for Inclusive Communities
University of Montana
Corbin Hall
Missoula, MT 59812-7056
Main Phone:  406-243-5467
Toll Free Number:  800-732-0323
Main Fax:  406-243-4730
Main Email:  rural@ruralinstitute.umt.edu
Website:  http://ruralinstitute.umt.edu/
Twitter:  https://twitter.com/riic_ed
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/RuralInstitute
AUCD State Profile: AUCD MT State Profile.pdf

Nebraska 

Nebraska UCEDD
Munroe-Meyer Institute for Genetics and Rehabilitation
University of Nebraska Medical Center
985450 Nebraska Medical Center
Omaha, NE 68198-5450
Main Phone:  402-559-6483
Toll Free Number:  800-656-3937
Main Fax:  402-559-5737 (UCEDD)
Main Email:  mshriver@unmc.edu
Website:  http://www.unmc.edu/mmi
Twitter:  Unmc_mmi
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/MunroeMeyerInstitute
AUCD State Profile: HORNETS 2018 (1).pdf

Nevada 

Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities
University of Nevada, Reno
Mail Stop 285
Reno, NV 89557
Main Phone:  775-784-4921
Toll Free Number:  1-800-216-7988
Main Fax:  775-784-4997
TTY:  775-327-5234
Website:  http://nced.info/

New Hampshire

Institute on Disability / UCED
University of New Hampshire
Institute on Disability
10 West Edge Drive, Suite 101
Durham, NH 03824-3595
Main Phone:  603-862-4320
Toll Free Number:  800-238-2048
Main Fax:  603-862-0555
Main Email:  Contact.IOD@unh.edu
Website:  http://www.iod.unh.edu
Twitter:  http://twitter.com/unhiod
Facebook:  http://www.facebook.com/instituteondisability
AUCD State Profile: AUCD NH Profile

New Jersey

The Boggs Center on Developmental Disabilities
Department of Pediatrics
Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
335 George Street
Suite 3500
New Brunswick, NJ 08901
Main Phone:  732-235-9300
Main Fax:  732-235-9330
Website:  http://rwjms.rutgers.edu/boggscenter

New Mexico 

University of New Mexico
Center for Development and Disability
Pediatrics
2300 Menaul Blvd NE
Albuquerque, NM 87107
Main Phone:  505-272-3000
Main Fax:  505-272-2014 (UCEDD)
Website:  http://cdd.unm.edu

New York

Rose F. Kennedy Center LEND
The Teaching Hospital of Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Montefiore Medical Center
1225 Morris Park Avenue
Bronx, NY 10461
Main Phone:  718-839-7162
Main Fax:  718-904-1162
Website:  http://www.einstein.yu.edu

North Carolina

Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Campus Box 7255
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7255
Main Phone:  919-966-5171
Main Fax:  919-966-2230
Website:  http://www.cidd.unc.edu/

North Dakota

North Dakota Center for Persons with Disabilities
Minot State University
Memorial Hall 203
500 University Avenue West
Minot, ND 58707
Main Phone:  701-858-3580
Toll Free Number:  800-233-1737
Main Fax:  701-858-3483
TTY:  701-858-3580
Main Email:  ndcpd@minotstateu.edu
Website:  http://www.ndcpd.org
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/North-Dakota-Center-for-Persons-with-Disabilities-NDCPD-118515191583313/
AUCD State Profile: AUCD in North Dakota

Ohio

University of Cincinnati Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center
Division of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics
3333 Burnet Avenue
MLC 4002
Cincinnati, OH 45229-3039
Main Phone:  513-803-0653
Main Fax:  513-803-0072
TTY:  513-636-4900
Main Email:  ucucedd@cchmc.org
Website:  https://www.ucucedd.org
Facebook:  www.facebook.com/ucucedd

Oklahoma

Center for Interdisciplinary Learning and Leadership
University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center
College of Medicine
PO Box 26901, ROB 342
Oklahoma City, OK 73190-3042
Main Phone:  405-271-4500
Toll Free Number:  800-627-6827
Main Fax:  405-271-1459
TTY:  405-271-1464
Website:  http://www.ouhsc.edu/thecenter/

Oregon

Oregon Health & Science University UCEDD
Oregon Health & Science University
Institute on Development & Disability
707 SW Gaines St.
Portland, OR 97239
Main Phone:  503-494-8364
Main Fax:  503-494-6868
Main Email:  idd@ohsu.edu
Website:  http://www.ohsu.edu/ucedd
Twitter:  https://twitter.com/OHSUUCEDD
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/OHSU.UCEDDCPC/

Pennsylvania 

Institute on Disabilities/UCEDD
Temple University
1755 N 13th Street, Suite 411
Howard Gittis Student Center – South
Philadelphia, PA 19122
Main Phone:  215-204-1356
Main Fax:  215-204-6336
TTY:  215-204-1356
Main Email:  iod@temple.edu
Website:  http://disabilities.temple.edu

Puerto Rico 

Puerto Rico University Center for Excellence on Developmental Disabilities/IDD
Graduate School of Public Health
Medical Sciences Campus
University of Puerto Rico
P.O. Box 365067
San Juan, PR 00936-5067
Main Phone:  787-754-4377
Toll Free Number:  866-754-4300
Main Fax:  787-764-5424
Website:  http://iddpr.rcm.upr.edu/

Rhode Island

UCEDD Program:
Paul V. Sherlock Center on Disabilities
Rhode Island College
600 Mount Pleasant Avenue
Providence, RI 02908
Main Phone:  401-456-8072
Main Fax:  401-456-8150
Website:  http://www.sherlockcenter.org

South Carolina

Center for Disability Resources
University of South Carolina
Department of Pediatrics
School of Medicine
Columbia, SC 29208
Main Phone:  803-935-5231
Main Fax:  803-935-5059
Website:  http://uscm.med.sc.edu/cdrhome/

South Dakota 

Center for Disabilities
Sanford School of Medicine of The University of South Dakota
Department of Pediatrics
1400 West 22nd Street
Sioux Falls, SD 57105-1570
Main Phone:  605-357-1439
Toll Free Number:  800-658-3080
Main Fax:  605-357-1438
TTY:  800-658-3080
Main Email:  cd@usd.edu
Website:  http://www.usd.edu/cd
Twitter:  https://twitter.com/CD_SouthDakota
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/CDSouthDakota/

Tennessee 

Boling Center for Developmental Disabilities
University of Tennessee Health Science Center
711 Jefferson Avenue
Memphis, TN 38105
Main Phone:  901-448-6511
Toll Free Number:  888-572-2249
Main Fax:  901-448-7097
TTY:  901-448-4677
Website:  http://www.uthsc.edu/bcdd/

Texas

Texas Center for Disability Studies
The University of Texas at Austin
Commons Learning Center
10100 Burnet Road
Austin, TX 78758-4445
Main Phone:  512-232-0740
Toll Free Number:  800-828-7839
Main Fax:  512-232-0761
TTY:  512-232-0762
Website:  https://disabilitystudies.utexas.edu/
Twitter:  https://twitter.com/TCDS_UT
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/TexasCenterforDisabilityStudies

Utah

Center for Persons with Disabilities
Utah State University
University Center for Excellence in Disabilities
6800 Old Main Hill
Logan, UT 84322-6800
Main Phone:  435-797-1981
Toll Free Number:  866-284-2821
Main Fax:  435-797-3944
TTY:  435-797-1981
Website:  http://www.cpd.usu.edu
Twitter:  https://twitter.com/@cpdusu
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/cpdusu/

Vermont

Center on Disability and Community Inclusion
The UCEDD of Vermont/University of Vermont
College of Education and Social Services
Mann Hall – 3rd Floor
208 Colchester Avenue
Burlington, VT 05405-1757
Main Phone:  802-656-4031
Main Fax:  802-656-1357
Main Email:  Jeanne.Nauheimer@uvm.edu
Website:  http://www.uvm.edu/cdci/
Twitter:  @CDCIatUVM
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/CDCIatUVM/

Virginia

Partnership for People with Disabilities
Virginia University Center for Excellence
Virginia Commonwealth University
PO Box 843020
700 E. Franklin Street
Richmond, VA 23284-3020
Main Phone:  804-828-3876
Main Fax:  804-828-0042
TTY:  800-828-1120
Website:  http://www.vcu.edu/partnership

Washington

Center on Human Development and Disabilities
University of Washington
Center on Human Development and Disability
PO Box 357920
Seattle, WA 98195-7920
Main Phone:  206-543-2832
Main Fax:  206-543-5771
Main Email:  Chdd@u.washington.edu
Website:  http://www.depts.washington.edu/chdd/ucedd.html

West Virginia

Center for Excellence in Disabilities (CED)
West Virginia University
959 Hartman Run Road, Research Park
Morgantown, WV 26505
Main Phone:  304-293-4692
Toll Free Number:  888-829-9426
Main Fax:  304-293-7294
TTY:  800-518-1448
Main Email:  contact@cedwvu.org
Website:  http://www.cedwvu.org/
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/wvuced/?fref=ts

Wisconsin

Waisman Center
University of Wisconsin-Madison
1500 Highland Ave
Madison, WI 53705-2280
Main Phone:  608-263-1656
Main Fax:  608-263-0529
Website:  http://www.waisman.wisc.edu/
Website 2:  https://wilend.waisman.wisc.edu/

Wyoming

Wyoming Institute for Disabilities (WIND)
University of Wyoming
Department 4298
1000 E. University Avenue
Laramie, WY 82071
Main Phone:  307-766-2761
Main Fax:  307-766-2763
TTY:  307-766-2720
Main Email:  uw.wind@uwyo.edu
Website:  http://www.uwyo.edu/wind
Twitter:  https://twitter.com/wind_wyo
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/Wyominginstitutefordisabilities/?ref=aymt_homepage_panel

 

Self- Injurious Behavior Resources

Working with individuals- both children and adults diagnosed with self-injurious behaviors can be challenging at the very least. Some examples of self-injurious behaviors include head banging, handbiting, and excessive scratching. There are many reasons why a student or individual may cause self-injurious behaviors including the inability to communicate needs, the environment, sensory issues and physiological issues. The following are articles on identifying cause of self-injury and ways to prevent it.

Autism, head banging and other self-harming behaviors– Autism Parenting

3 techniques to stop self-injurious behavior of children with autism– Steinberg Behavior Solutions

6 Strategies for Addressing Self-Injurious Behaviors– Wonderbaby

Effective evidence-based strategies to minimize self-injurious behaviors in young children with autism- CSUSB Scholarworks

Essential guide to self-injurious behavior and autism– Research Autism

Head banging, self-injury and aggression in autism– Treat Autism

Self-injurious behavior in people with developmental disabilities-crisis prevention.com

Self-injury in patients with intellectual disabilities- Nursing2020

Understanding and treating self-injurious behavior– Autism Research Institute

Understanding self-injury among autistic individuals- Good Therapy

 

Understanding and Treating Self-Injurious Behavior

Understanding and Treating Self-Injurious Behavior

Top 10 Trainings Every Bus Driver and Matron Should Have

Transporting a child with a disability to school on a bus is indeed a huge responsibility. For children with a disability, alertness matters as well ensuring bus drivers and matrons are trained on managing many issues that can arise on the bus. the following are the top ten trainings every bus driver and matron should have:

CPR. Although in adults cardiac arrest is often sudden and results from a cardiac cause, in children with cardiac arrest is often secondary to respiratory failure and shock. A CPR course will teach the sequence of steps for children including basic steps for calling for additional assistance.

First Aid. A course in first aid will train bus drivers and matrons steps to take in the case of an emergency. Children with disabilities have a variety of issues, taking a course in a first aid course can help to save a child’s life. Courses should include topics on choking, bleeding, injuries, allergic reactions, sudden illnesses and signs and symptoms.

Disability Awareness. This will  help both bus drivers and matrons identify and understand their own personal attitudes and perception regarding children and adults with disabilities.

Overview of Developmental Disability. Understanding the various types of developmental disabilities is vital in transporting children and adults from home to school. A course on developmental disability should include information on learning about the different types of disabilities,  including cognitive, physical and invisible. An overview should also include information on barriers that exist for people with disabilities.

Introduction to Epilepsy. Children and adults with disabilities tend to experience a high prevalence of epilepsy. Both drivers and matrons should be aware there are several types of seizures from generalize seizures to partial seizures. Some children experience seizures where it may appear they are simply staring. A training on epilepsy will teach ways to recognize the signs of epilepsy what do to in the event of a seizure while driving.

Understanding Behaviors. All behaviors have a meaning . It is a way of communicating for children and adults who may not have the ability to express pain, fear or anger verbally.

Bus Safety and Disabilities. Bus drivers are generally taught how to drive the bus or van in a safe manner. But what in instances when there is an emergency with children with disabilities on board? There should be training on emergencies that can occur on the bus including fires, accidents, and vehicle breakdown.

Recognizing Abuse. Studies show a large number of children with disabilities are abused and even larger numbers are bullied. a training course in recognizing abuse should cover not only looking for physical signs, but also children who are mistreated and neglected as well.

Safe Loading. Keeping children safe on the bus on van is one of the key responsibilities of the bus driver and matron. Some children with disabilities may use wheelchairs and other adaptive equipment. Trainings should include knowledge on using the wheelchair lift including the manual lift in the case of an emergency. Vital information includes safe securing of lap trays, electrical wheelchairs, vest of harness which should be monitored during the bus ride.

Overview of Autism. While no two students are alike. there are general characteristics that children with autism may exhibit including, anxiety, depression, seizure disorder, cognitive delays, sensory challenges and repetitive behaviors. Being well-informed of autism and how to mange will make the bus ride go smooth on those challenging days.

Can you think of any other important trainings bus drivers and matron should have when transporting a child with a disability?

 

 

Aspiration Precautions

Children and adults with developmental disabilities often face challenges with eating, drinking and swallowing disorders than the general population. It is estimated that adults with intellectual disabilities require support from caregivers during mealtime. It is common among people who have a diagnosis of cerebral palsy, intellectual disability, physical  disability and muscular dystrophy.

Dysphasia is a medical term used to describe any person having difficulty swallowing foods and liquids taking  more energy and time to move food from the mouth to the stomach. Signs of dysphasia may include:

  • Drooling
  • Food or liquid remaining in the oral cavity after swallowing
  • Complaints of pain when swallowing
  • Coughing during or right after eating or drinking
  • Extra time needed to chew or swallow
  • Reflux of food

Dysphasia can lead to aspiration. Aspiration is defined when food, fluid, or other foreign material gets into the trachea or lungs instead of going down the esophagus and into the stomach. when this occurs, the person is able to cough to get the food or fluid out of their lungs, in some cases especially with children and adults with disabilities may not be able to cough. This is known as Silent Aspiration.

A complication of aspiration is Pneumonia which is defined as inhaling food, saliva, and liquids into the lungs

According to the Office of People with Developmental Disabilities Health and safety Alert, factors that place people at risk for aspiration include:

  • Being fed by others
  • Weak or absent coughing, and/or gag reflexes, commonly seen in people with cerebral palsy.
  • food stuffing and rapid eating/drinking
  • Poor chewing or swallowing pills
  • GERD- the return of partially digested food or stomach contents to the esophagus
  • Providing liquids or food consistencies the person is not able to tolerate such as eating whole foods.
  • Seizures that may occur during eating and/or drinking.

How to recognize signs and symptoms of Aspiration:

  • Choking or coughing while eating or just after eating
  • Drooling while eating or just after eating
  • Eyes start to water
  • Shortness of breath
  • Fever 30 minutes after eating
Intervene immediate if there are signs of aspiration:
  • Stop feeding immediately
  • Keep the person in an upright position
  • Call 911 if the person has difficulty or stops breathing and no pulse
  • Start rescue breathing

Minimize aspiration from occurring by serving the appropriate food texture and liquid consistency. If you are not sure of the right consistency, check with your health care provider. The following are pictures of food consistencies.

Courtesy of OPWDD

Courtesy of OPWDD

Whole. Food is served as it is normally prepared; no changes are needed in
preparation or consistency

Courtesy of OPWDD

1 ” Pieces cut to size. Food is served as prepared and cut into 1-inch pieces
(about the width of a fork).

Courtesy of OPWDD

1/4 Pieces Cut to Size. Food is cut with a knife or a pizza cutter or placed in a food
processor and cut into ¼ -inch pieces (about the width of a #2 pencil)

Courtesy of OPWDD

Ground. Food must be prepared using a food processor or comparable equipment
until MOIST, COHESIVE AND NO LARGER THAN A GRAIN OF RICE, or relish
like pieces, similar to pickle relish. Ground food must always be moist. Ground meat
is moistened with a liquid either before or after being prepared in the food processor
and is ALWAYS served with a moistener such as broth, low fat sauce, gravy or
appropriate condiment. Hard, dry ground particles are easy to inhale and must be
avoided.

 

Courtesy of OPWDD

Pureed. Food must be prepared using a food processor or comparable equipment.
All foods are moistened and processed until smooth, achieving an applesauce-like or
pudding consistency. A spoon should NOT stand up in the food, but the consistency
should not be runny. Each food item is to be pureed separately, unless foods are
prepared in a mixture such as a soup, stew, casserole, or salad.

Aspiration Precautions

  • Make sure the person eats slowly and takes small bites of food
  •  Ensure the person takes small sips of liquids
  • Focus on the person’s swallowing
  • Make sure the person remains upright for a minimum of thirty minutes after eating

Intellectual Disabilities And Epilepsy

According to the Epilepsy Foundation, epilepsy is the fourth most common neurological disorder and affects people of all ages. In fact, 1 in 26 people have seizures and while people who are diagnosed with epilepsy may have no other problems, this is not the case for children and adults with an intellectual and developmental disability where the rates are much higher.

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It is estimated that 30% of children with epilepsy also have another type of disability. Some studies show that children with an intellectual disability and cerebral palsy, had a 35% chance of developing epilepsy, children with an intellectual disability alone had an 8% chance and children with a brain injury occurring after birth stood a 75% chance of developing epilepsy. Statistically, the risky of a child with a developmental disability experiencing an unprovoked seizure by age 5 is 4 times likely than the general population. It is estimated 1.8% of U.S. adults have epilepsy compared to 22% among people with intellectual disabilities.

People with intellectual disabilities tend to also have worse prognosis with adults having a higher rate of death including Sudden Unexplained Death In Epilepsy (SUDEP).

Epilepsy

Epilepsy is a chronic disorder with recurrent unprovoked seizures. According tot he National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), epilepsys are a spectrum of brain disorders ranging from severe, life-threatening to ones that are more benign. The International League Against Epilepsy created a new definition of epilepsy. A person is considered to have epilepsy if they meet any of the following conditions:

  1. At least two provoked (or reflex) seizures occurring greater than 24 hours apart.
  2. One Unprovoked (or reflex) seizure and a probability of further seizures similar to the general recurrence risk (at least 60%) after two unprovoked seizures, occurring over the next 10 years.
  3. Diagnosis of an epilepsy syndrome

A seizure is defined as an event and epilepsy is the disease involving recurrent unprovoked seizures.

Intellectual Disability

According to DSM-5, an intellectual disability is a disorder with onset during the developmental period that includes both intellectual and adaptive functioning deficits in conceptual social, and practical domains including deficits in intellectual functions such as reasoning, problem-solving, planning, abstract thinking, judgment, academic learning and learning from experiences.  The severity levels range from mild to profound.

Although there is a high relationship between epilepsy and an intellectual disability, little research has been conducted on safe prescribing practices of an antiepileptic drugs for people with intellectual disabilities. What is known about epilepsy and an intellectual disability is that more severe disabilities are typically caused by damage to the brain

Why is it important to discuss?

Given the large number of people with an intellectual disability and epilepsy, treatment may be more complicated due to multiple impairments including people with a diagnosis of autism, intellectual disability and epilepsy. More research needs to occur which will help to reduce morbidity rates and help to develop accurate guidelines.

10 Easy Steps of Audit and Survey Readiness

Annual audits and surveys can be very intimidating. A group of state surveyors showing up at the residence or day program to review services given to individuals with developmental disabilities.

What is the purpose of the audit?

In each state, Immediate Care Facilities (ICF), Immediate Residential Alternatives (IRAs), Waiver services or privately operated programs are funded through Medicaid Assistance Annually State agencies. Annual surveys serve the purpose of recertifying facilities and to make any further recommendations. Overall, the goal is to ensure the quality of for the individuals receiving services.

What are surveyors looking for?

In recent years, the focus is more on ensuring facilities that provide services and supports to individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities are providing opportunities for individual choices including person-centered planning, community inclusion and choice-making. Typically, State auditors will review the Individualized service Plan (ISP) document to determine it the ISP is both current and accurate.

Audit Preparation

State Auditors generally spend some time talking to staff. They may ask you questions relating to the person’s plan. The questions are often generated after they have read the individual’s ISP plan. The questions that are asked are more than likely things that you do well everyday. here are 10 easy steps as you prepare for the auditing process:

  1. Knowledge of Individuals. know each person’s plan including person-centered planning plan, medical needs, preferences and habilitation plan.
  2. Cleanliness. Make sure the environment is neat and orderly.
  3. Privacy. Remember to give the person privacy when needed.
  4. Choice. Offer choices throughout activities whenever possible. The auditors may ask you how do you teach choice-making.
  5. Tone. Always speak in a positive and appropriate tone of voice.
  6. Small groups. Work in small groups whenever possible. Incorporate variety  of choice during activities.
  7. Community activities. Ensure individuals are able to make choices in activities in the community and community inclusion opportunities are available.
  8. Universal Precaution Guidelines. Know the precautions and follow them. Remember to change gloves when moving from one individual to the next.
  9. Active Programming. The auditors may ask questions related to what they have read in the individuals ISP or CFA (Comprehensive Functional Assessment).
  10. Safeguards. make sure you are able to describe the individual’s supervision needs.

Remember: Demonstrate your self-confidence, because you are good at what you do!

What is Lowe Syndrome?

Lowe Syndrome also known as Oculocerebrorenal Syndrome is a rare genetic disorder that affects the eyes, brain and kidneys. It has a prevalence of 1 in 500,000 and mainly affects males.

Click here to download PDF version

Signs and Symptoms
  • Congenital cataracts
  • eye abnormalities and eye disease
  • glaucoma
  • kidney abnormalities (Renal Fanconi Syndrome)
  • dehydration
  • abnormal acidic blood
  • progressive kidney problems
  • feeding problems
  • bone abnormalities
  • scoliosis
  • weak or low muscle tone (hypotonia)
  • joint problems
  • developmental delays including motor skills
  • short stature
  • intellectual disability
  • seizure
  • behavioral issues

Children and adults diagnosed with children and adults may also show the following signs and symptoms due to an intellectual disability:

  • decrease learning ability
  • delays in crawling
  • delays in sitting up
  • difficulty solving problems
  • lack of curiosity
  • language and speech delays
  • poor memory
  • behavior problems
Teaching Strategies

The following strategies will help when teaching a child or an adult diagnosed with Lowe Syndrome:

  • Use short and simple sentences to ensure understanding
  • Repeat directions
  • Teach specific skills when possible
  • Use strategies such as chunking, backwards shaping, forward shaping and role modeling.
  • Use concrete information
  • Provide immediate feedback

Image thanks to Robert Thomson on Flickr.com (creative commons)

Resources

National Organization for Rare Disorders

Genetics Home Reference

Dove Med

Wikipedia

How To Organize Clothing In A Residential Setting

Organizing clothes in a regular household can be challenging. Imagine striving to clean, organize and store clothes when it is 12 people living under one roof! This can often lead to clothing getting mixed up causing further confusion.

There are a number of steps you can take that will help to alleviate this often challenging task:

  1. Create an inventory list for each person. This list should include a tri-annual schedule when clothing are sorted. Choose a time in the spring, fall and winter when to sort out clothing. An inventory list should also list the types of clothing and the number of items for each. Below is an example of an inventory.  You will find a free template here: clothing_inventory
  2. Spend a day with each person and go through the closet taking everything out. Sort the clothing and throw out anything that is torn or broken. People may have a favorite item they might like to wear. Look to see if it can get either fixed or replaced
  3. Once clothing is organized, choose a day with the person and determine a laundry day. While it can be easier to try to do wash clothing for several people at a time, you risk the chance of mixing up clothing.
  4. Always make sure if possible, the person participates as much as they can in this household task. It encourages independence and individuality at the same time.

I like to hear tips you use for clothing organizing for multiple people.