Halloween Art Activities

halloween

Besides trick or treating, Halloween provides a great opportunity to participate in some fun art and craft activities. Each of the craft activities provide multi-sensory opportunities. The following activities are items easily found around the home.

Bottle Bats– Halloween bat made from recycled materials

Craft Sticks Spider Web– Create a spider web using craft sticks

Halloween Coloring Pages-Several coloring sheets with a Halloween theme.

Halloween Lesson Ideas– A website that contains several lesson plan ideas

How to carve a pumpkin– A lesson plan with a step by step guide on carving a pumpkin

Lollipop Ghosts– Using lollipops to create an inexpensive treat

Mosaic Pumpkins– easy to make pumpkin design

Paper Plate Spiders– Create spiders using regular paper plates

Paper Plate Witch– Create a paper plate witch using your own hands

Pasta Skeleton– A skeleton made by gluing dried pasta on black paper

Pastel Spider Webs– Art lesson that focuses on lines, shapes and colors

Pumpkin Candleholder– An easy to make pumpkin candle holder

Trick or Treat Jug– Create a jack o’ lantern using a milk carton

 

Transition Planning

IDEA Regulations and Transition Services

The term “transition services” means a coordinated set of activities for a child with a disability that:

  • Is designed to be within a results-oriented process, that is focused on improving the academic and functional achievement of the child with the disability to facilitate the child’s movement from school to post-school activities, including postsecondary education, vocational education, integrated employment (including supported employment), continuing and adult education, adult services, independent living, or community participation
  • Is based on the individual child’s needs, taking into account the child’s strengths, preferences, and interest.
  • Includes instruction , related services, community experiences, the development of employment and other post-school adult living objectives, and if appropriate, acquisition of daily living skills and functional vocational evaluations.
What is the Transition Process?

The transition process is designed to help students with disabilities move smoothly from school to adult life.

Resources on Transition Planning

Center for Parent Information and Resources– Webpage includes information on IDEA’s requirement on transition and how to include the student in the transition process.

Disability’s.gov’s Guide to Student Transition Planning– Topical links on secondary education and transition, transitioning to adult health care and options for life after high school.

National Association of Special Education Teachers– Great webpage on a variety of topics relating to transition planning including, overview of transition services, types of services covered, recordkeeping, employment planning, travel training, assistive technology and residential placement options.

National Parent Center on Transition and Employment– Website includes information on middle and high school transitioning planning including, IDEA, IEP, college planning and several worksheets on preparing for employment and transition planning.

Understood– article on understanding the transition process.

WrightsLaw– This page contains loads of information on transitioning planning including articles on IEP and transition planning, legal requirement for transition components of the IEP and IDEA 2004.

Happy Holidays!

 

HAPPY HOLIDAYS2015

Special Needs Resource Blog will take a break during the holidays and will return Monday, January 4, 2016 with new information, tools and resources to post including more downloadable free tools and templates Monday thru Thursday. I am excited and look forward to sharing more resources with you in the new year.
Thanks to all of you for following my blog this year. Wishing you and your families joy and peace all through the holidays and throughout the new year. May the spirit of the holidays be with you throughout the new year.  🙂   🙂

 

Thanksgiving and Mealtime Precautions

mealtime_thanksgiving_logo

Thanksgiving is the day set aside in the United States and Canada as a day of pausing to reflect all that we are thankful for by connecting with friends and family over good food. It is also the day of taking special precautions when serving people with developmental disabilities.

Aspiration is a huge risk during the holiday season. Factors that place people at risk for aspiration includes the following:

  • Being fed by someone else
  • Poor chewing or swallowing skills
  • Weak or absent coughing/gagging reflexes which is common in people with cerebral palsy or muscular dystrophy
  • Eating to quickly
  • Inappropriate fluid consistency
  • Inappropriate food texture

For children and adults with autism, Thanksgiving may be a challenge for a variety of reasons:

  • Sensory and emotional overload with large groups
  • Picky eaters
  • Difficulty with various textures of food

To help you mange Thanksgiving with ease, click on the articles below:

8 tips for managing Thanksgiving with children with autism

Autism and Thanksgiving: How to cope with the feasting and hubbub

Feeding kids with sensory processing disorders

Preparing for Thanksgiving on the autism spectrum

Swallowing problems? What to do about Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving dinner ideas for speech therapy activities

Tips for Navigating Thanksgiving on the Spectrum

 

 

Developmental Disability Organization of the Month

EPIC-Long Island

 

non-profit_epic

Epic Long Island is a non-profit organization originally established as the Epilepsy Foundation of Long Island, offers a broad range of services to individuals with developmental disabilities, emotional and mental health challenges and epilepsy. Services include, community and clinical services and day habilitation and residential information.

For more information, please visit Epic Long Island at: www.epicli.org

Happy Holidays

The Special Needs Blog wishes you and yours a happy holiday!

happy holidays

Person First Language

Here are some resources on people first language

Language used to describe individuals with disabilities-ASHA Publication Board

Person First Language 101- JJslist

What is people first language?- The ARC

Examples of People First Language- by Kathie Snow

Communicating with and About People with Disabilities-CDC.gov

An Introductory Guide to Disability Language and Empowerment-Syracuse University