New Study Links Hyperfocus and ADHD

Published By: ADDitude Magazine
Written By: Neil Petersen

A newly published study has pried the lid off the mysterious phenomenon of “hyperfocus,” tying it inextricably to symptoms of attention deficit disorder (ADHD or ADD) in adults.

Though not included in the official DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for ADHD, hyperfocus is a condition familiar to many individuals with ADHD who report becoming intensely focused on activities they find rewarding or interesting.

Anecdotally, we have known that, when a person with ADHD experiences hyperfocus, his or her attention becomes laser-like. They lose track of time, and distractions fade away. Switching to other tasks becomes difficult. But from a scientific standpoint, we’ve known very little about hyperfocus, most notably whether it is truly more prevalent among people with ADHD. To read the rest of the story, click here

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Teaching Self-Confidence to Children with ADHD

Dr. William Dodson, expert on ADHD issues states that it is estimated that those with ADHD receive 20,000 more negative messages by age 12 than those without the condition. This may be due to the characteristics of ADHD including:

  • Unable to give close attention to detail or makes careless mistakes
  • Struggles to follow-through on instructions
  • Avoids or dislikes task requiring sustained mental effort
  • Losing things necessary for task or activities
  • unorganized and messy.

Children, teens and adults with ADHD more than likely grew up hearing, “you’re lazy and can’t do anything right.” Low self-esteem develops from constant negative feedback believing they are not smart or good enough.

The following articles provide tips, resources and information on ways to build self-confidence in kids with ADHD:

4 small ways to build confidence in kids

5 ways to boost your ADHD child’s confidence 

10 strategies for helping kids with ADHD build self confidence

Build self-esteem in your child with ADHD

Childhood ADHD and poor self-esteem

Don’t let ADHD crush children’s self-esteem

How to boost your ADHD child’s self-esteem

How to vanquish a child’s low self-esteem

How to Improve Self Esteem In Kids with ADHD

The importance of self-esteem for kids with learning and attention issues

 

Resources For Teaching Sequencing Skills

Sequence is defined as a set of related events, movements, or things that follow each other in a particular order. For many children and adults with developmental delays and disabilities, the ability to arrange thoughts, information and language may be a challenge due to issues with their executive function capabilities. The following resources, tips and strategies will help you teach sequencing skills.

How to teach sequencing skills at home

How to teach sequencing skills to children

How to teach sequencing to preschool children

Sequencing activities for students with autism

Sequencing skills teaching strategies 

Story sequence strategies

Strategies for teaching your child sequencing skills

Teaching sequencing skills

The importance of sequencing skills in a child’s development

Tips to teach sequencing skills in children

Overlap in traits of autism, attention deficit persists into adulthood

Published by: Spectrum
Written by: Nicholette Zeliadt

Traits linked to autism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) tend to co-occur even in adulthood, according to one of the first studies of the traits in that age group1.

The results extend support for the idea that autism and ADHD are intrinsically linked — a notion that is largely based on studies of children.

“Not much is known about the transition from later adolescence into adulthood with regard to autism and ADHD,” says lead investigator Ralf Kuja-Halkola, a statistician at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden. Click here to read the rest of the story.

ADHD Looks Different In Women. Here’s How — and Why.

Source: ADDitude

From job opportunities to personal income to marital relationships, there’s hardly an area in which American women haven’t made great strides in recent decades. But when it comes to getting diagnosed with and treated for ADHD, women still have a long way to go.

ADHD in Women

Women are as likely as men to have ADHD, and the latest research suggests that ADHD in women causes even greater emotional turmoil. Yet ADHD is still thought of as something that affects only men and boys. Consequently, women with ADHD are more likely than men to go undiagnosed (or misdiagnosed), and less likely to receive appropriate treatment. Click here to read the rest of the story.

ADHD- Facts and Statistics

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)  is a neurological disorder characterized by a pattern of inattention and/or hyperactivity-impulsivity that disrupts functioning in both children and adults
Facts and Statistics
  • ADHD is a condition characterized by inattentiveness, hyperactivity and impulsivity
  • It is one of the most common neurodevelopmental disorders of childhood
  • It is usually diagnosed in childhood and last into adulthood
  • People diagnosed with ADHD may have difficulty paying attention and or controlling impulsive behavior
  • 70% of people with ADHD in childhood will continue to have it in adolescence
  • 50% will continue into adulthood
  • ADHD is not caused by watching too much, parenting or having too much sugar
  • ADHD may be caused by genetics, brain injury or low birth weights
  • Is a highly genetic, brain-based syndrome that has to do with the brain regulation in executive functioning skills
Prevalence

UNITED STATES

Children & Adolescents

The 2016 National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH) interviewed parents and reports the following ADHD prevalence data among children ages 2–17 (Danielson et al. 2018):

  • 6.1 million children (9.4 percent) have ever been diagnosed with ADHD. This includes:
    • About 388,000 young children ages 2-5 (or 2.4 percent in this age group)
    • 2.4 million school-age children ages 6-11 (or 9.6 percent in this age group)
    • 3.3 million adolescents ages 12-17 (or 13.6 percent in this age group)
  • 5.4 million children (8.4 percent) have a current diagnosis of ADHD. This includes:
    • About 335,000 young children ages 2-5 (or 2.1 percent in this age group)
    • 2.2 million school-age children ages 6-11 (or 8.9 percent in this age group)
    • 2.9 million adolescents ages 12-17 (or 11.9 percent in this age group)
  • Treatment used by children ages 2-7 with a current diagnosis of ADHD:
    • Two out three were taking medication (62 percent).
    • Less than half received behavioral treatment in the past year (46.7 percent).
    • Nearly one out of three received a combination of medication and behavioral treatment in the past year (31.7 percent).
    • Nearly one out of four had not received any treatment (23 percent).
  • Severity of ADHD among children ages 2-17:
    • 14.5 percent had severe ADHD
    • 43.7 percent had moderate ADHD
    • 41.8 percent had mild ADHD
  • Co-occuring conditions (children ages 2-17):
    • Two out of three children (63.8 percent) had at least one co-occuring condition.
    • Half of all children (51.5 percent) had behavioral or conduct problems.
    • One out of three children (32.7 percent) had anxiety problems.
    • One out of six children (16.8 percent) had depression.
    • About one out of seven children (13.7 percent) had autism spectrum disorder.
    • About one out of 80 children (1.2 percent) had Tourette syndrome.
    • One in a hundred adolescents (1 percent) had a substance abuse disorder.
  • By race or ethnicity (children ages 2-17):
    • 8.4 percent White
    • 10.7 percent Black
    • 6.6 percent Other
    • 6.0 percent Hispanic/Latino
    • 9.1 percent Non-Hispanic/Latino

Adults with ADHD

  • 4.4 percent of the adult US population has ADHD, but less than 20 percent of these individuals seek help for it.
  • 41.3% of adult ADHD cases are considered severe.
  • During their lifetimes, 12.9 percent of men will be diagnosed with ADHD, compared to 4.9 percent of women.
  • About 30 to 60 percent of patients diagnosed with ADHD in childhood continue to be affected into adulthood.
  • Adults with ADHD are 5 times more likely to speed
  • Adults with ADHD are nearly 50 percent more likely to be in a serious car crash.
  • Having ADHD makes you 3 times more likely to be dead by the age of 45
  • Anxiety disorders occur in 50 percent of adults with ADHD.
Reference

Additude Magazine

CHADD- National Resource Center on ADHD

 

 

October is ADHD Awareness Month

October is ADHD Awareness Month. A month designated to bring awareness and acceptance to understanding individuals diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The first studies on ADHD began to surface in 1902 when British Pediatrician, Sir George Still, described a group of children as disobedient and uninhibited. These behaviors were thought to be based on biology since many family members exhibited similar characteristics

The following are articles on ADHD:

47 hacks people with ADHD use to stay on track

10 things ADHD is- and 3 it isn’t.

Setting students with ADHD and Autism up for success

Children with ADHD and Autism are more likely to develop anxiety

Decoding the overlap between Autism and ADHD

ADHD coping strategies you haven’t tried

 

ADHD and math teaching resources

Great websites for women and girls with ADHD

Strategies in training employees with ADHD

30 must-know ADHD teaching resources

40 facts you should know about ADHD

ADHD Adult Resources

 

Teaching Self-Regulation and Autism Spectrum Disorder

Many children diagnosed with autism experience high levels of anxiety which leads to difficult coping skills. Self-regulation helps children on the autism spectrum learn how to mange stress and build resilience. It is through self-regulation that students learn ways to function and manage their own stress, the following links provide information on teaching children techniques on self-regulation. These techniques are also useful for children diagnosed with ADHD and anyone with emotional difficulties and impulses.

 

30 games and activities for self-regulation

Calm down kit for older children

Emotional dysregulation and the core features of autism spectrum disorder

Emotional regulations and autism spectrum disorder

How can we help kids with self-regulation?

How to teach self-regulation

Intervention teaches emotional regulation

Lion and lamb self-regulation activity

Self-regulation in the classroom

Self-regulation/Self-Control: Tips and strategies 

Strategies for teaching kids self-regulation

Strategy helps autistic kids rein in emotions

Teaching kids to self-regulate in the classroom

Teaching kids with autism about emotions and self-regulations

Tools for teaching self-regulation and relaxation

10 Things ADHD Is– and 3 It isn’t

Published by: Self Magazine

Written by: Christiana Stiehl

Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, or ADHD, is one of those mental health conditions that has become cultural shorthand in a pretty inappropriate way. Ignoring the fact that “I’m so ADHD” isn’t even grammatically correct, throwing this acronym around to flippantly explain distraction or disinterest waters down the true meaning of this extremely nuanced disorder. Not only that, it can further isolate those who do have ADHD, since they’re often already misunderstood. To dispel some of the common myths surrounding ADHD, we’ve broken down what the disorder actually is—and a couple things it isn’t, too. Click here to read the rest of the story

Setting Students With ADHD Up for Success

Published by: Eutopia
Written by: Nina Parrish

Teachers often come to the classroom with an unclear understanding of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and they are rarely provided with strategies that detail how to work with students who have been diagnosed with ADHD, even though such students make up an increasingly large number of their students—11 percent and growing as of 2011, according to data gathered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

As a special education teacher and tutor who coaches struggling students (many with ADHD), I have found several classroom strategies to be effective. Click here for the rest of the story