Children with ADHD and Autism Are More Likely To Develop Anxiety

Website: News Medical Life Sciences

The study, which compares comorbidities among patients with ASD and ADHD, and ASD alone, is one of the largest of its kind.

A team of researchers from the Kennedy Krieger Institute used the data from a cross-sectional survey of children aged between six to seventeen years old with ASD. The study included 3,319 children, 1,503 of which had ADHD and were monitored by the Interactive Autism Network between 2006 and 2013. Click here to read the rest of the story

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Decoding The Overlap Between Autism and ADHD

Written by: Ricki Rusting

Published By: Spectrum

Every morning, Avigael Wodinsky sets a timer to keep her 12-year-old son, Naftali, on track while he gets dressed for school. “Otherwise,” she says, “he’ll find 57 other things to do on the way to the bathroom.”
Wodinsky says she knew something was different about Naftali from the time he was born, long before his autism diagnosis at 15 months. He lagged behind his twin sister in hitting developmental milestones, and he seemed distant. “When he was an infant and he was feeding, he wouldn’t cry if you took the bottle away from him,” she says. He often sat facing the corner, turning the pages of a picture book over and over again. Although he has above-average intelligence, he did not speak much until he was 4, and even then his speech was often ‘scripted:’ He would repeat phrases and sentences he had heard on television. Read the rest of the story here

Why Are Public Toilets A Challenge For Children and Young People With Autism?

Sign, Bathroom, Restroom, Symbol, Icon
Written By: Natasha Bolger
Published By: Bladder and Bowel UK

Problems with imagination may lead to a lack of ability to know what is going on or what will come next, resulting in inflexibility, difficulty changing routines, fears and anxieties, as well as an inability to transfer a skill learned in one place to another. Therefore, the child may be able to use the toilet at home or at school, but does not understand that they can or should do this in different toilets.

These problems may on their own make public toilets a difficult place for children and young people with autism to be. However, if there are sensory differences, particularly hypersensitivities, which is an increased awareness of different sensory inputs, these may make public toilets a particularly difficult or frightening place to be. It needs to be remembered that sensory problems can make things that most of us do not even notice intrusive or even painful for some people with autism. Read the rest of the story here.

Special Needs Article Resources

The following are helpful articles on a variety of topics from children with disabilities to adults with physical disabilities.


Submitted by: Jennifer McGregor

Explaining special needs to your child: 15 great children’s books– This article provides information on books to help promote understanding and tolerance of children with disabilities. Books include topics on ADHD, autism, visual and physical disabilities and invisible disabilities such as anxieties.

How to Remodel for Accessibility– Includes steps to remodeling your home for wheelchair accessibility

Developing Your Blind Child’s Sleep Schedule– Although this article focuses on the sleep pattern of children who are visually impaired, it is also helpful for children with autism who display an irregular sleeping pattern.

How to Exercise if You Have Limited Mobility– An article that focuses on fitness tips for people with physical disabilities including the three different types of exercises.

The Link Between Sensory Sensitivity And Anxiety No One Talks About

Sensory Processing Disorder anxiety

Published by: Learning Minds

Have you ever felt overwhelmed by your environment? Do sights, sounds, smells or textures sometimes exhaust you and make you feel anxious? You could be suffering from Sensory Processing Disorder.

Our brains take in information from our five senses through our eyes, nose, ears, skin and taste buds. We use this information in order to be able to function in the world. However, if during the intake of information our processing goes awry, it can then affect us in different ways. Read here the read the rest of the story.

Maternal Anxiety and Depression May Affect the Quality of Life of Children with Cerebral Palsy

Mother’s Anxiety or Depression Affects Her Child’s Quality of Life, Study Suggests
Source: Cerebral Palsy News Today

A new study suggests that maternal anxiety and depression may affect the quality of life of children with cerebral palsy (CP).

The study, “Impact of Symptoms of Maternal Anxiety and Depression on Quality of Life of children with Cerebral Palsy,” was recently published in the journal Archives of Neuropsychiatry.

CP is a leading cause of physical disability.  A heterogenous condition, it causes motor and sensory impairment, negatively affecting quality of life (QOL). However, that QOL in CP patients is multidimensional, and can be affected by other variables, including the person’s specific type of CP, cognitive function, and other medical disorders. Click here to read the rest of the story.

Good Communication Can Make Medical Visits More Successful For Patients With Autism

Hospital, Doctor, Nurse, Medical, Health, Professional
Source: (News Medical)

Doctor visits can be a challenge for patients with autism, their families and health care providers. Kristin Sohl, associate professor of child health at the University of Missouri, offers several steps providers and families can take to make medical visits more successful. She says that all of them require good communication between the provider and parent before, during and after medical visits.

Before a Visit

“Parents or caregivers should call ahead to the provider’s office to discuss individual accommodations that the patient might need during the visit, such as a comfort item or a distraction toy,” Sohl said. “Tell the office staff if there have been prior negative experiences—or successful ones—so the office can provide a supportive environment and avoid triggering anxiety in the patient.” Click here to read the rest of the story.

Managing Anxious Behavior In Children:7 Tips

Anxious
Source: (Psych Central)
Author: Tara Bates-Duford

Stress and anxiety is a normal part of life for many people, including children. Children, like adults can struggle with intense feelings of frustration and anxiety leading to challenges in cognition, academic performance, managing emotions, building resiliency, etc. Anxiety in can children diminishes their intellectual, emotional and social development, as well as physical health. Increased stress and anxious behavior in children can be associated with parent’s divorce, abuse, biological sensitivity, personality, stress in school, self or parent inflicted pressure, death of a loved one, significant/abrupt familial changes, rigid schedule, etc.

Anxious feelings do not exist in a vacuum, anyone can experience stressful and anxious feelings, even children who are often overlooked. As with adults, children respond differently to stress depending on their age, individual personalities, and coping skills. When it comes to anxiety in children, very young children may not be able to fully explain or understand their feelings, whereas older kids may be able to express what they are feeling and why they are feeling it. Children struggling with anxiety often struggle with low self-esteem, self-doubt, and difficulty building and establishing social relationships. Children that do not develop the skills to appropriately manage frustrations and anxiety or develop maladaptive coping skills will experience difficulty with building self-confidence. Children that develop healthy coping skills exhibit a higher rate of self-confidence, increased social and self-control skills, have better management and control of their mood, communicate their needs more effectively, perform better in school than peers struggling with decreased confidence, etc.   Click here for the rest of the story

5 Resources to Support Parents of Children with Autism

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I received these great resource articles for families with child with autism from Angela Tollerson, a blogger from familyhealthnet. Her site provides resources on family health and wellness. Please share these links with others who may benefit and don’t forget to stop by and visit Angela’s blog at: forfamilyhealth.net

  1. Anxiety and Autism Spectrum Disorders
    http://www.iidc.indiana.edu/pages/anxiety-and-autism-spectrum-disorders
  2. The Moment I Got My Son with Autism’s Need for Routine
    https://www.autismspeaks.org/blog/2014/09/16/moment-i-got-my-son-autisms-need-routine
  3. The Well Travel Guide for Parents of Autism Spectrum Children
    https://travelblog.expedia.ca/autism-travel-guide/
  4. Nutrition for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder
    http://www.eatright.org/resource/health/diseases-and-conditions/autism/nutrition-for-your-child-with-autism-spectrum-disorder-asd
  5. 10 Fun Activities for Children with Autism
    http://www.education.com/magazine/article/10-activities-children-autism/