Meet the woman fighting to change people’s views of autism

Source: Devonlive
Written by: Charlotte Vowles

Growing up, Heidi Slatter always felt she was different from other children.

Heidi, who lives in Paignton, grew up and went to school in Totnes. Unfortunately for Heidi, school was a traumatic experience, a place where she said she experienced bullying from teachers as well as other pupils. Click here for the rest of the story.

She said: ”I was highly sensitive, intelligent and doing life differently.’

”I had a horrendous time at school. Which has now left me with childhood trauma. I left with no GCSES or qualifications. The school system completely failed me and I suffered intense bullying. I was not being listened to, or got told I was a naughty child.”

Thoughts and ideas to support children and adults with autism

Source: Living Autism
Written by: Geoff Evans

One definition of a foundation refers to it being an anchor and providing a solid surface upon which to build.
In a world of quick fixes and instant solutions when supporting individuals with autism we are all at risk of being drawn in to trying interventions and approaches that offer a quick fix or an easy solution without having to do all the hard work of laying the foundations that will help ensure success.
Over many years of working with children and adults with autism I have learnt that what often works is taking time to lay the foundations, that is to ensure we have both the values and best practice in place to support what we do. In this article I explore some of the basics that help provide a firm foundation upon which we can build successful interventions and approaches.

The person with autism has a right to be consulted with and involved in all aspects of living their lives including what approaches and interventions are used

Underpinning all we do should be a commitment to seeking the views and opinions of the person with autism irrespective of their abilities and how autism impacts upon them. Whilst we may take this for granted in the past we might have often put approaches and strategies in place without consulting and actively involving the person with autism and then wondered why they were not successful. I will cover this area in more detail in a future article; however, for now it is worth considering and asking yourself the following:

1. What support and methods can we put in place to enable the person with autism to be fully involved, make comments and make real choices regarding their lives and the support they receive? This can include the use of photographs, symbols, video clips or one of the many Apps that are now available for smart devices. Click here to read the rest of the story.

 

Autistic Teenager Creates App To Help People On The Spectrum

Source: Forbes
Written by: Nicholas Fearn

An 18-year-old software developer has created an iOS app to help those on the autistic spectrum in their day-to-day lives.

Ethan Shallcross, who has a form of autism and lives in the English town of Torquay, developed Aumi to enable people to manage their anxiety, monitor their mental health and reduce burnout.

“The app has been built with people on the autism spectrum in mind, and his has influenced the design and functionality of the entire app,” he says. “However, it is not just for people on the autism spectrum. People who have high anxiety, are frequently burnt out, or struggle with their mental health may also find it useful.” Click here to read the rest of the story.

A Closer Look at Sleep Disorders with Autism

The inability to get a good night’s sleep is experienced by most people at one time or another. However, recent studies show sleep concerns are more prevalent with people diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD).


Author: Autism Parenting Magazine

For many people with autism, it can be a challenge to get to sleep and stay asleep, which can have a negative impact on certain aspects of autism, such as repetitive behaviors, which can, in turn, lead to more sleep problems. If sleep issues are not properly addressed, the problem can become an endless cycle for many. Click here for the rest of the story

January Special Needs Article Links

Welcome to the January article links and resources. These are articles that I  tweeted during the month of January on special needs and developmental disability topics. I tweet articles and links everyday.

  1. IEP terms you should know– understood.org
  2. 10 Things Medics Should Know About Your Autism– Autism Parenting Magazine
  3. Horse therapy improved memory and attention in cerebral palsy patients-horsetalk.co
  4. 5 myths about sensory processing disorder– Integrated Strategies
  5. It’s not easy teaching special education-NPR
  6. 5 ways to use interactive books in the classroom-Autism Classroom Resources
  7. Parent of child with down syndrome pens book on financial planning for special needs family members– The Gazette
  8. Kindergarten and Sensory Processing Disorder– The Jenny Evolution
  9. Surviving the wandering nightmare– Autism After 16
  10. 7 best teaching apps for kids with autism– Teachercast
  11. Five early signs of autism-Neuroscience News
  12. 5 effective strategies for the inclusive classroom– KQED
  13. Preventing wandering: Resources for parents and first responders– Autism Speaks
  14. Why person-first language doesn’t always put the person first– Think Inclusive
  15. ABA- Teaching verbs to children with autism- About Education
  16. How journaling with my ASD son created a special life connection– Autism Parenting Magazine
  17. 25 fine motor activities using household items– Mama OT
  18. Why is occupational therapy important for children with autism?-Network Autism
  19. Temperature regulation: why does my autistic child refuse to wear a coat– Jeannie Davide-Rivera