What is Childhood Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder?

OCD is a neurobiological condition. It is estimated that 1% to 3% of children and adolescents are affected by obsession- compulsive disorder (OCD).The DSM-IV defines OCD as persistent thoughts, impulses, or images that are experienced as inappropriate and the cause of anxiety and distress. These thoughts cause obsession as a way to ease their anxiety. Your child may perform repetitive actions such as chewing food a certain number of times, refusing to eat certain foods, separation anxiety or a need for order and perfection

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) Infographic

 

 

 

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Epilepsy Facts

Epilepsy is a disorder of the central nervous system often caused by abnormal electrical discharges that develop into seizures. The following are additional facts on epilepsy and seizures:

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  • More people live with epilepsy than autism, spectrum disorders, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis and cerebral palsy combined.
  • You can’t swallow your tongue during a seizure. It is physically impossible.
  • You should never force something into the mouth of someone having a seizure.
  • Don’t restrain someone having a seizure.
  • Epilepsy is not contagious .
  • Anyone can develop epilepsy.
  • Epilepsy is not rare.
  • 1 in 26 Americans will develop epilepsy in their lifetime.4An estimated 3 million Americans and 65 million people worldwide live with epilepsy.
  • In 2/3 of patients diagnosed with epilepsy, the cause is unknown.
  • Up to 50,000 deaths occur annually in the U.S. from status epilepticus (prolonged seizures). (SUDEP) and other seizure-related causes such as drowning and other accidents.
  • SUDEP accounts for 34% of all sudden deaths in children.
  • Epilepsy costs the U.S. approximately 15.5 billion each year.
  • A seizure is a transient disruption of brain function due to abnormal and excessive electrical discharges in brain cells.
  • Epilepsy is a disease of the brain that predisposes a person to excessive electrical discharges in the brain cell.
  • It is diagnosed when 2 or more unprovoked seizures have occurred.
  • It must be at least 2 unprovoked seizures more than 24 hours apart.
  • About 14% have simple partial seizures.
  • 36% have complex partial seizures.
  • 5% have tonic-clonic seizures.
  • Seizures can be caused by head trauma, stokes, brain tumor and a brain infection.
  • Causes are unknown in 60 to 70% of cases.
  • The prevalence is 1% of the U.S. population.
  • Approximately 2.2 to 3 million in the U.S. have seizures.
  • It affects all ages, socioeconomic and racial groups.
  • Incidents are higher in children and older adults.
  • Seizures can range from momentarily blanks to loss of awareness
  • Almost 150,000 people in the U.S. develop epilepsy every year.
  • No gender is likely to develop than others.
  • 1/3 of individuals with autism spectrum disorders also have epilepsy.
  • The prevalence of epilepsy in people with an intellectual disability is higher than the general population.

20 Facts You Should Know About Down Syndrome

In keeping with celebrating Down Syndrome Awareness month, here are some additional facts on Down syndrome:

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  • Down syndrome occurs when an individual has a full or partial extra copy of chromosome 21. This alters the course of development and causes characteristics associated with Down syndrome.
  • There are 3 types of Down syndrome

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  • It is the most commonly occurring chromosome condition
  • 1 in 691 babies are born in the United States
  • The incidences increases with the age of the mother due to high fertility rates in younger women.
  • An increased for certain medical conditions such as, congenital heart defects, respiratory, Alzheimer disease and childhood Leukemia.
  • Common traits include low muscle tone, small stature, upward slant in the eyes and a single deep crease across the center of the palm.
  • Translocation is the only type that is inherited
  • Is named after British Doctor John Langdon Downs the first to categorize the common features
  • Dr. Jerome Lejeune discovered Down syndrome is a genetic disorder
  • A person has 3 copies of chromosome 21 instead of 2
  • Is the leading cause of intellectual and developmental disabilities in the United States and the World.
  • 38% of Americans know someone with Down syndrome
  • The average lifespan is 60. In 1983, it was 25.
  • 39.4 % are in the mild intellectual disability range of 50-70.
  • 1% are on the border
  • A growing number live independently
  • Occurs in all races and economic levels.
  • Some high school graduates with Down syndrome participate in post-secondary education.
  • In the United States, Down syndrome is the least funded major genetic condition

 

40 Facts You Should Know About ADHD

October is ADHD Awareness Month. An opportunity to have a greater understanding and awareness of ADHD. How much do you really know about ADHD? some of the fact below may surprise you.

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  • ADHD is a condition characterized by inattentiveness, hyperactivity and impulsivity
  • It is one of the most common neurodevelopmental disorders of childhood
  • It is usually diagnosed in childhood and last into adulthood
  • People diagnosed with ADHD may have difficulty paying attention and or controlling impulsive behavior

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  • People with ADHD may day-dream often
  • 70% of people with ADHD in childhood will continue to have it in adolescence
  • 50% will continue into adulthood
  • ADHD is not caused by watching too much, parenting or having too much sugar
  • ADHD may be caused by genetics, brain injury or low birth weights
  • Is a highly genetic, brain-based syndrome that has to do with the brain regulation in executive functioning skills
  • Affects people of every age, gender, IQ, religious and socio-economic background
  • In 2011, CDC reported 9.5% of children are diagnosed with ADHD
  • Boys are diagnosed 2-3 times as often as girls
  • Up to 30% of children and 25-40% of adults with ADHD have co-existing anxiety disorders.
  • Can be difficult to diagnosed
  • Children with untreated ADHD are often mislabeled as problem children
  • The average age of diagnosis is 7
  • Symptoms typically first appear between the age of 3 and 6
  • About 4% of American adults over the age of 18 deal with ADHD on a daily basis
  • 12.9 percent of men will be diagnosed
  • 4.9 percent of women will be diagnosed
  • Children living below twice the poverty level have increased risk
  • The lowest states with ADHD rates are Nevada, New Jersey, Colorado, Utah and California
  • The highest states with ADHD rates are Kentucky, Arkansas, Louisiana, Indiana, Delaware and South Carolina
  • An estimated 6.4. million American children have been diagnosed
  • ADHD is often overlooked in girls
  • The average cost of treating ADHD per person is $14,576
  • The yearly cost to Americans is 42.5 billion
  • U.K. children are less likely to be diagnosed with ADHD than U.S. children
  • Boys and girls display very different symptoms

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  • It was first mentioned in 1902. British Pediatrician Sir George Still described “an abnormal defect of moral control in children.”
  • He found that some affected children could not control their behavior the way typical children would.
  • Was originally called hyperkinetic impulse disorder
  • In 1798, Sir Alexander Crichton used to term, “mental restlessness.” to describe ADHD
  • During the 1940’s, the disorder was blamed on brain damage
  • In 1955, the FDA approved the drug Ritalin
  • In 1980, the American Psychological Association changed the name to ADD
  • In 1989, the name was changed again to ADHD
  • Sleep disorders affect people with ADHD
  • ADHD contributes to more driving citations and accidents

Autism Facts and Statistics

April is Autism Awareness Month

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1 percent of the world population is diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder

Prevalence in the United States is estimated at 1 in 68 births

1 in 42 boys are diagnosed with autism

1 in 189 girls are diagnosed with autism

100 individuals are diagnosed everyday

More than 3.3 million Americans live with autism spectrum disorder

Autism is the fastest growing developmental disability

Autism services cost the United States citizens 236-262 billion annually

Autism costs a family $60,000 a year on an average

Boys are nearly five times more likely than girls to have autism

Autism generally appears before the age of 3

40% of children with autism do not speak

25-30% of children with autism have some words at 12 to 18 months, and then lose them.

Almost half (44%) of children with autism have average to above average intellectual ability.

Autism is reported to occur in all racial, ethnic and socioeconomic groups.

The UK estimate is 1 in 100 are diagnosed with autism

30-50% of individuals with autism also have seizures.

Autism Spectrum Disorders refers to a group of complex neurodevelopment disorders which includes repetitive patterns of behavior and difficulties with social communication, interaction, sensory processing and motor issues.

Eugene Bleuler, a Swiss psychiatrist first termed autism to adult schizophrenia.

In 1943, Leo Kanner dissociated autism from schizophrenia.

Autism is more common than childhood cancer, diabetes and AIDS combined.

Accidental drowning accounted for 91% total U.s. deaths reported in children with autism due to wandering.

 

Dyslexia Resources

 

Statistics

Dyslexia Center of Utah
Dyslexia Facts and Statistics- Austin Learning Solutions
Dyslexia Statistics- Learning Inside-Out
Dyslexia Statistics and Myth Busting

Medical Sites

Kids Health
Mayo Clinic
Medicine Net
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
WebMD
Wikipedia

 

Organizations

American Dyslexia Association
Davis Dyslexia Association International
International Dyslexia Association
Learning Disabilities Association of America
National Center for Learning Disabilities
The Dyslexia Foundation

Books

The Dyslexic Advantage: Unlocking the Hidden Potential of the Dyslexic Brain
Dyslexia: Tine for Talent
Secret Life of a Dyslexic Child
The Gift of a Dyslexic Child
Dyslexia at College