Learning Disabilities Facts and Statistics

In the United States, 1.7 percent of the population reports having a learning disability, totaling 4.6 million Americans

Prevalence of reported learning disabilities is much higher among those living above poverty (2.6 percent) versus those living above poverty (1.5 percent)

Prevalence among whites, blacks, and Hispanics is about equal.

More than half of people with learning disabilities (55 percent) had some type of involvement with the criminal justice center.

1/3 of students have been held back in a grade at least once

46% of working-age adults with learning disabilities report being employed while 8% report being unemployed.

Only 5% of young adults with learning disabilities reported they were receiving accommodations in the workplace.

1 in 5 children in the United States have learning and thinking differences such as ADHD and dyslexia

More than half (54%) of the kids in special education have IEP’s for learning disabilities.

48% of parents believe incorrectly that kids grow out of learning differences

Up to 10 percent of the population are affected by specific by specific learning disabilities such as dyslexia and dyscalculia.

Fact Sheet: Learning Disabilities

 

Dowwnload Here: learning disabilities

36 Epilepsy Facts You Should Know

Epilepsy is a disorder of the central nervous system often caused by abnormal electrical discharges that develop into seizures. The following are additional facts on epilepsy and seizures:

  1. More people live with epilepsy than autism, spectrum disorders, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis and cerebral palsy combined.
  2. You can’t swallow your tongue during a seizure. It is physically impossible.
  3. You should never force something into the mouth of someone having a seizure.
  4. Don’t restrain someone having a seizure.
  5. Epilepsy is not contagious .
  6. Anyone can develop epilepsy.
  7. Epilepsy is not rare.
  8. 1 in 26 Americans will develop epilepsy in their lifetime.
  9. An estimated 3 million Americans and 65 million people worldwide live with epilepsy.
  10. In 2/3 of patients diagnosed with epilepsy, the cause is unknown.
  11. Up to 50,000 deaths occur annually in the U.S. from status epilepticus (prolonged seizures). (SUDEP) and other seizure-related causes such as drowning and other accidents.
  12. Between 4 and 10 out of 1,000 people on earth live with active seizures.
  13. 3.4 million people in the United States have epilepsy.
  14. Epilepsy is not contagious
  15. 1/3 of people diagnosed with epilepsy have uncontrolled seizures because the available treatment does not work.
  16. SUDEP accounts for 34% of all sudden deaths in children.
  17. Epilepsy costs the U.S. approximately 15.5 billion each year.
  18. A seizure is a transient disruption of brain function due to abnormal and excessive electrical discharges in brain cells.
  19. Epilepsy is a disease of the brain that predisposes a person to excessive electrical discharges in the brain cell.
  20. It is diagnosed when 2 or more unprovoked seizures have occurred.
  21. It must be at least 2 unprovoked seizures more than 24 hours apart.
  22. About 14% have simple partial seizures.
  23. 36% have complex partial seizures.
  24. 5% have tonic-clonic seizures.
  25. Seizures can be caused by head trauma, stokes, brain tumor and a brain infection.
  26. Causes are unknown in 60 to 70% of cases.
  27. The prevalence is 1% of the U.S. population.
  28. Approximately 2.2 to 3 million in the U.S. have seizures.
  29. It affects all ages, socioeconomic and racial groups.
  30. Incidents are higher in children and older adults.
  31. Seizures can range from momentarily blanks to loss of awareness
  32. Almost 150,000 people in the U.S. develop epilepsy every year.
  33. No gender is likely to develop than others.
  34. 1/3 of individuals with autism spectrum disorders also have epilepsy.
  35. The prevalence of epilepsy in people with an intellectual disability is higher than the general population.
  36. It takes up to 5 times more energy for a person with epilepsy to complete even the most simple task.

Developmental Disability Data/Survey Resources

ADHD

ADHD and psychiatric comorbidity

ADHD throughout the years (CDC) 

National Prevalence of ADHD and Treatment

National survey of the diagnosis and treatment of ADHD and Tourette Syndrome -Survey about children aged 2 to 15 years old in 2011-2012.

What types of treatment do children with ADHD receive?

Autism

Autism Data Visualization Tool– prevalence estimates and demographic characteristics at the national, state and community levels (CDC)

CDC releases first estimates of the number of adults living with autism spectrum disorder in the United States

New ASD prevalence numbers show gaps are closing, but more work is needed

National Database for Autism Research– HealthData.Gov

Prevalence of self-injurious behaviors among children with autism spectrum disorders

Cerebral Palsy

Birth prevalence of cerebral palsy

Prevalence of cerebral palsy, co-occurring autism spectrum disorders, and motor functioning

Developmental Disabilities

Increase in developmental disabilities among children in the United States

Trends in the prevalence of autism spectrum disorder, cerebral palsy, hearing loss, intellectual disabilities, and vision impairment, Metropolitan Atlanta, 1991-2010

Mental Health

U.S. children with diagnosed anxiety and depression

Facts and Statistics- Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

Obsessive- Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is defined as a disorder that includes two core symptoms- obsessions and compulsions. According to the Census for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), obsessions are defined by:

  • Thoughts, impulses, or images that occur over and over again. These thoughts, impulses or images are unwanted. They cause a lot of anxiety and stress.
  • The person who has these thoughts, impulses or images tries to ignore them or tries to make them go away.

Compulsions are defined as:

  • Repeated behaviors or thoughts over and over again or according to certain rules that must be followed exactly in order to make an obsession go away.
  • The person feels that the purpose of the behaviors or thoughts is to prevent or reduce distress or prevent some feared event or situation.

The following are facts and statistics on Obsessive Compulsive Disorder:

  • 1.2% of U.S. adults had OCD in the past year.
  • OCD was higher for females (1.8%) than males (0.5%).
  • Among adults with OCD, approximately one half (50.6%) had serious impairment
  • 34.8% of adults with OCD had moderate impairment
  • 14.6% had mild impairment.
  • OCD affects 2.2 million adults
  • The average onset is 19 with 25% of cases occurring by age 14
  • One-third of affected adults first experience symptoms in childhood
  •  17% of autistic people may specifically have OCD
  • Because of similar characteristics, it is often overlooked
  • It affects people of all races, ethnicities, and socioeconomic backgrounds
  • OCD is one of the top 20 causes of illness-related disability worldwide for individuals between 15 and 44 years of age
  • 1 in 40 adults are affected.
  • 1 in 100 children are affected
  • Other conditions may co-exist with OCD including anxiety, bipolar, ADHD, autism spectrum, Tourette syndrome, and major depressive disorder.
  • Worldwide, OCD is approximately 2% of the general population
  • OCD ranks 10th place among all diseases
  •  1 in every 200 children has the disorder 60 to 70% of OCD children improve significantly with therapy.
  • Many people still hide their OCD behaviors.
Beyond OCD.org
Healthy Place.org
National Institute of Mental Health