Study of Nonverbal Autism Must Go Beyond Words, Says Expert


Source: Spectrum
Author: Sarah Deweedt

Roughly 25 percent of people with autism speak few or no words. A generation ago, that figure was closer to 50 percent. Most researchers agree that the decline is due to the recognition of more people with milder forms of autism, as well as to the advent of early intervention programs  that have helped more children. Click here for the rest of the story.

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Over 30 Online Resources on Rett Syndrome

 

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So much has been written on the subject of Autism, but how much do you know about Rett Syndrome? This disorder fall under the autism spectrum disorder category due to similar traits and characteristics.

Rett Syndrome is a neuro-developmental rare disorder that affects primarily girls. Discovered by Andreas Rett who described the symptoms as wasting and slow growth. Rett Syndrome is rare and occurs in 1 out of 23,000 births. The disorder consists of four stages:
Stage 1: Generally begins between the ages of 6 and 18 months. Gross motor skills begin to slow down and stagnates
Stage 2: Between the age of 1 and 3 years, will regress and lose any skills that were previous acquired.
Stage 3: During this stage, apaxia becomes apparent. Seizures become common and gross motor skills deteriorate.
Stage 4. Loses all gross motor skills and generally uses a wheelchair.

Symptoms

  • Difficulty in coordination
  • Loss of communication skills
  • Dyspraxia
  • Severe motor disabilities
  • Abnormal hand movement
  • Breathing abnormalities
  • Cold hands and feet
  • Apraxia
Similar in Autism Characteristics include:
  • Screaming
  • Crying
  • Hyperventilation
  • Lack of eye contact
Similarities in cerebral palsy include:
  • Hypotonia
  • Gait difficulties
  • Spasticity
  • Teeth-grinding

Medical Sites

Boston Children’s Hospital
Cleveland Clinic
Mayo Clinic
MedicineNet.com
Medscape
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Strokes
National Organization for Rare Disorder
Science Daily
WebMD
Wikipedia

Organizations and Foundations

Girl Power 2 Cure
Kate Foundation
New Jersey Rett Syndrome Association
Northwest Rett Syndrome Foundation
Rett Syndrome.org
Southeastern Rett Syndrome Alliance

Twitter

Rett Girl
Rett Syndrome GP2C
Rett Syndrome News
Rett UK

Facebook

Cure Rett
Ontario Rett Syndrome Association
Rett Syndrome of Ireland

Blogs

Grace for Rett
Jessica’s Journey with Rett Syndrome
Living with Rett Syndrome
My Silent Angel’s Fight

Teaching Strategies

ACC for Children Who Have Rett Syndrome
Multi-Model Communication Strategies
Rett Syndrome: Teacher Tools
Some Rett Syndrome Tips

You Tube Video’s

Down Syndrome Organizations

 The internet offers a number of website that provide resources on Down syndrome. Topics including family support groups, education, medical and advocacy. For additional information, click on the links below:

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Band of Angels: http://www.bandofangels.com/-

Established in 1994, Band of Angels provides support for individuals with Down Syndrome and their families. The website offers links on Down Syndrome support groups and a litany of topics including, adoption, autism and education.

Down Syndrome International https://www.ds-int.org/

A U.K. based international organization comprising a membership of individuals and organizations from all over the world. Disseminates information on Down Syndrome including prenatal diagnosis, early intervention, education, medical, health, employment, aging and human rights. Down Syndrome International also promoted World Down Syndrome Day (March 21) as a day dedicated to people with Down Syndrome.

 

Global Down Syndrome http://www.globaldownsyndrome.org/

Provides fundraising, education and governmental advocacy for the Linda Crnic Institute for Down Syndrome. Resources available on the website include, information on research, medical care and facts on Down Syndrome.

 

 

International Down Syndrome Coalition: http://theidsc.org/

Dedicated to helping and advocating for individuals with Down syndrome from conception and throughout life. Offers support to parents who are new to the Down syndrome diagnosis by connecting parents to each other.

 

National Association for Down Syndrome http://www.nads.org/

NADS is the oldest organization in the United States serving individuals with Down syndrome and their families. Also provides families with information and resources that will enable them to access appropriate services and educates the public about Down syndrome.

 

National Down Syndrome Congress http://www.ndsccenter.org/

The purpose of the NDSC is to promote the interests of people with Down syndrome and their families through advocacy, public awareness, and information. When we empower individuals and families from all demographic backgrounds, we reshape the way people understand and experience Down syndrome.

National Down Syndrome Society http://www.ndss.org/

NDSS provides resources to new and expectant parents and offers a toll-free helpline and email services. NDSS also focuses on transitions , wellness and education

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dementia and Intellectual Disabilities

Articles

Dementia and Intellectual Disabilities

Dementia in Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

Dementia for Carers of People with Down’s Syndrome

Down Syndrome and Alzheimer’s Disease

Alzheimer’s Disease and Down Syndrome Overview

Alzheimer Disease in Down Syndrome-Medscape Reference

Down’s Syndrome and Dementia Journal Article

Down’s Syndrome and Alzheimer’s Disease Risk