ADHD- Facts and Statistics

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)  is a neurological disorder characterized by a pattern of inattention and/or hyperactivity-impulsivity that disrupts functioning in both children and adults
Facts and Statistics
  • ADHD is a condition characterized by inattentiveness, hyperactivity and impulsivity
  • It is one of the most common neurodevelopmental disorders of childhood
  • It is usually diagnosed in childhood and last into adulthood
  • People diagnosed with ADHD may have difficulty paying attention and or controlling impulsive behavior
  • 70% of people with ADHD in childhood will continue to have it in adolescence
  • 50% will continue into adulthood
  • ADHD is not caused by watching too much, parenting or having too much sugar
  • ADHD may be caused by genetics, brain injury or low birth weights
  • Is a highly genetic, brain-based syndrome that has to do with the brain regulation in executive functioning skills
Prevalence

UNITED STATES

Children & Adolescents

The 2016 National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH) interviewed parents and reports the following ADHD prevalence data among children ages 2–17 (Danielson et al. 2018):

  • 6.1 million children (9.4 percent) have ever been diagnosed with ADHD. This includes:
    • About 388,000 young children ages 2-5 (or 2.4 percent in this age group)
    • 2.4 million school-age children ages 6-11 (or 9.6 percent in this age group)
    • 3.3 million adolescents ages 12-17 (or 13.6 percent in this age group)
  • 5.4 million children (8.4 percent) have a current diagnosis of ADHD. This includes:
    • About 335,000 young children ages 2-5 (or 2.1 percent in this age group)
    • 2.2 million school-age children ages 6-11 (or 8.9 percent in this age group)
    • 2.9 million adolescents ages 12-17 (or 11.9 percent in this age group)
  • Treatment used by children ages 2-7 with a current diagnosis of ADHD:
    • Two out three were taking medication (62 percent).
    • Less than half received behavioral treatment in the past year (46.7 percent).
    • Nearly one out of three received a combination of medication and behavioral treatment in the past year (31.7 percent).
    • Nearly one out of four had not received any treatment (23 percent).
  • Severity of ADHD among children ages 2-17:
    • 14.5 percent had severe ADHD
    • 43.7 percent had moderate ADHD
    • 41.8 percent had mild ADHD
  • Co-occuring conditions (children ages 2-17):
    • Two out of three children (63.8 percent) had at least one co-occuring condition.
    • Half of all children (51.5 percent) had behavioral or conduct problems.
    • One out of three children (32.7 percent) had anxiety problems.
    • One out of six children (16.8 percent) had depression.
    • About one out of seven children (13.7 percent) had autism spectrum disorder.
    • About one out of 80 children (1.2 percent) had Tourette syndrome.
    • One in a hundred adolescents (1 percent) had a substance abuse disorder.
  • By race or ethnicity (children ages 2-17):
    • 8.4 percent White
    • 10.7 percent Black
    • 6.6 percent Other
    • 6.0 percent Hispanic/Latino
    • 9.1 percent Non-Hispanic/Latino

Adults with ADHD

  • 4.4 percent of the adult US population has ADHD, but less than 20 percent of these individuals seek help for it.
  • 41.3% of adult ADHD cases are considered severe.
  • During their lifetimes, 12.9 percent of men will be diagnosed with ADHD, compared to 4.9 percent of women.
  • About 30 to 60 percent of patients diagnosed with ADHD in childhood continue to be affected into adulthood.
  • Adults with ADHD are 5 times more likely to speed
  • Adults with ADHD are nearly 50 percent more likely to be in a serious car crash.
  • Having ADHD makes you 3 times more likely to be dead by the age of 45
  • Anxiety disorders occur in 50 percent of adults with ADHD.
Reference

Additude Magazine

CHADD- National Resource Center on ADHD

 

 

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40 Facts You Should Know About ADHD

October is ADHD Awareness Month. An opportunity to have a greater understanding and awareness of ADHD. How much do you really know about ADHD? some of the fact below may surprise you.

adhdfacts

  • ADHD is a condition characterized by inattentiveness, hyperactivity and impulsivity
  • It is one of the most common neurodevelopmental disorders of childhood
  • It is usually diagnosed in childhood and last into adulthood
  • People diagnosed with ADHD may have difficulty paying attention and or controlling impulsive behavior

    adhdtable

  • People with ADHD may day-dream often
  • 70% of people with ADHD in childhood will continue to have it in adolescence
  • 50% will continue into adulthood
  • ADHD is not caused by watching too much, parenting or having too much sugar
  • ADHD may be caused by genetics, brain injury or low birth weights
  • Is a highly genetic, brain-based syndrome that has to do with the brain regulation in executive functioning skills
  • Affects people of every age, gender, IQ, religious and socio-economic background
  • In 2011, CDC reported 9.5% of children are diagnosed with ADHD
  • Boys are diagnosed 2-3 times as often as girls
  • Up to 30% of children and 25-40% of adults with ADHD have co-existing anxiety disorders.
  • Can be difficult to diagnosed
  • Children with untreated ADHD are often mislabeled as problem children
  • The average age of diagnosis is 7
  • Symptoms typically first appear between the age of 3 and 6
  • About 4% of American adults over the age of 18 deal with ADHD on a daily basis
  • 12.9 percent of men will be diagnosed
  • 4.9 percent of women will be diagnosed
  • Children living below twice the poverty level have increased risk
  • The lowest states with ADHD rates are Nevada, New Jersey, Colorado, Utah and California
  • The highest states with ADHD rates are Kentucky, Arkansas, Louisiana, Indiana, Delaware and South Carolina
  • An estimated 6.4. million American children have been diagnosed
  • ADHD is often overlooked in girls
  • The average cost of treating ADHD per person is $14,576
  • The yearly cost to Americans is 42.5 billion
  • U.K. children are less likely to be diagnosed with ADHD than U.S. children
  • Boys and girls display very different symptoms

adhddiff2

  • It was first mentioned in 1902. British Pediatrician Sir George Still described “an abnormal defect of moral control in children.”
  • He found that some affected children could not control their behavior the way typical children would.
  • Was originally called hyperkinetic impulse disorder
  • In 1798, Sir Alexander Crichton used to term, “mental restlessness.” to describe ADHD
  • During the 1940’s, the disorder was blamed on brain damage
  • In 1955, the FDA approved the drug Ritalin
  • In 1980, the American Psychological Association changed the name to ADD
  • In 1989, the name was changed again to ADHD
  • Sleep disorders affect people with ADHD
  • ADHD contributes to more driving citations and accidents