Person-Centered Planning Tool Resources

What is Person-Centered Planning?

Person-Centered Planning (PCP) is a set of approaches designed to assist someone to plan their life and supports. It is used as a life planning model to enable individuals with disabilities to increase their personal self-determination and improve their own independence.

A person-centered plan is use to communicate who they are, their likes and dislikes, to express their wants and needs and what works for them.

Resources and Templates– An information and resource site for person-centered thinking, planning and practices including tools, templates and planning for older adults.
Manual for Person-Centered Planning Facilitators– Created for person-centered planning facilitators developed by the Institute on Community Integration UAP University of Minnesota. Contains topics on preparing a checklist, facilitating a plan, follow-up and challenging situations with difficult group members.
Circle of Support Workbook– Developed by the Foundation for People with Learning Disabilities. Provides an introduction to starting a circle of support group for individuals with disabilities.

Various Approaches

Essential Lifestyle Planning- A guide process designed to help the person discover what matters to them the most.

Essential Lifestyle Planning Forms- The Delaware Division of Developmental Disabilities Services provide planning form tools including personal profile, and workbook.

MAPS

Inclusion Press– Resources available  to purchase and download for free. Information on person-centered planning- PATH, MAPS and Circle of Support. The website also includes resources on inclusion.
Person-Centered Planning Relationship Map– Free download relationship map including instructions on completing the map.

PATH- Planning Alternative Tomorrows’ with Hope- uses a visual tool to detail the future

Personal Futures Planning- An ongoing process where the team replaces system-centered methods with person-centered planning.

A Brief Guide to Personal Futures Planning – A 25 page booklet which provides information on building a personal profile, using MAPS, and components of the Personal Futures Planning process.
Planning for the Future– A workbook to help students, their families and professionals to plan for life after high school. Using a person-centered approach to identify the student’s strength.

Person centered planning

Person centered planning education site

Person centered planning-supported decision-making

Adult Provider Training Resources

Abuse and Neglect

Sexual Abuse of People with Disabilities

Sexual Abuse Definition-The ARC

Preventing Abuse of Children with Cognitive, Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Abuse and Neglect: Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

Choking/ Aspiration

Teaching Material on Choking

Arizona Department of Economic Security

Eunice Kennedy Shriver-Dysphasia, Aspiration and Choking

Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities

New York State Choking Prevention Resources

Washington State Department of Social and Health Services

State Agencies Choking Alerts

Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities

Minnesota Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities 

New Jersey Health and Safety Alert Choking

CPR Training for Disabled Students

Fire Safety

Educational materials for people with disabilities

Fire safety and teaching people with intellectual disabilities

Fire Safety for Individuals with disabilities

Fire safety outreach materials for people with disabilities

Guide to teaching fire safety to students with disabilities

Incident Reporting

Incident/abuse, identification, reporting and processing 

Incident reporting for individuals with developmental disabilities

Incident response and reporting manual

Major unusual incidents and unusual incidents

Personal support worker incident report requirements

Overview of Developmental Disabilities

Introduction to developmental disabilities

Introduction to intellectual and developmental disabilities 

Introduction to developmental disabilities classroom participant guide

Orientation Manual for Direct Support Professionals

Van Safety

A guide for drivers of seniors and persons with disabilities

Oversight of Passenger Safety

Safe Transportation of People in Wheelchairs

Transportation Safety Awareness

More or Less Money Activity

Download Here: more or less money activity

This worksheet is a PDF document. You may save it to your computer or print out for immediate use. Free for educational use at home or in classroom/day habilitation setting.

Shopping Activity: $15.00 Budget

Download Here:$15.00 Shopping Activity

This worksheet is a PDF document. You may save it to your computer or print it out for immediate use. This is free for educational use at home or in a classroom/day habilitation program.

Teaching Special Needs Individuals Temperature Taking

In some residences and group homes, individuals are being monitored for COVID19 by daily temperature readings. People with disabilities are probably used to getting their temperatures taking each time they are seen by their physician. In these challenging times, why not teach the skill of taking one own’s temperature. It is a basic independent living skill to learn.

 

Using a digital thermometer would probably be the most effective and it is also easy to read. teaching thermometer reading affects the following skill:

  • Attention Skills
  • Follow Directions
  • Follow 2-step commands
  • Personal Care
  • Self-advocacy skills

Prerequisite skills

  • understand cause and effects
  • able to understand numbers
  • focus attention 1-5 minutes
  • Understand sequences

Objective: With modeling, student will be able to accurately read the thermometer

Time: 5 minnutes

Material: digital thermometer (best used for underarm and the mouth)

Steps:

  1. explain that a normal temperature reading is considered around 98.7 and temperature taking is done to determine if a person has a fever or is sick.
  2. The teaching method best used is through  modeling. Explain the steps to the individual and begin by taking your own temperature first.
  3. Once done, inform the individual he should do the same by using the following steps:
  • The student will pick up the thermometer
  • The student will wash the thermometer
  • The student will carefully place the tip of the thermometer under his/her tongue
  • With the mouth closed, the student will leave the thermometer in until he/she hears a beeping sound
  • The student will remove the thermometer
  • The student will accurately read the temperature.

You can also create a temperature log, where the individual takes their temperature on a daily basis and writes down their temperature on a chart.