Autism And Fragile X Syndrome

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) about 1 in 54 children have been identified with autism spectrum disorder. ASD is reported to occur in all racial, ethnic and socioeconomic groups. ASD is more than 4 times more common among boys than girls. About 1 in 6 (17%) children aged 3-17 years were diagnosed with a developmental disability.

The CDC states that Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is the most common known cause of inherited intellectual disability and affects both males and females, with females having milder symptoms than males.

Autism is considered a common comorbid condition with Fragile X syndrome- it is estimated that he prevalence of ASD in Fragile X syndrome varies. some studies show a 50% relationship. While there are similar characteristics, the motivation appears to be for different reasons. For example, indiviuals with Fragile X Syndrome appear to avoid eye contact due to social anxiety and shyness while people with autism simply prefer to be left alone.

The following articles provide insightful information:

 

Autism Spectrum Disorder in Fragile X Syndrome– Further Inform Neurogenetic Disorders (FIND)

Autism Spectrum Disorder in Fragile X Syndrome Cooccurring Conditions and Current Treatment– Journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics

Fragile X and Autism Factsheet– Synapse

Fragile X is a common cause of autism and intellectual disabilities– UC Davis Health

Fragile X symptoms don’t add up to autism studies suggest– European Fragile X Network

Fragile X Syndrome and Autism– Interactive Autism Network

Fragile X Syndrome and Autism Spectrum Disorder- Otsimo

Fragile X Syndrome and Autism Spectrum Disorder: Similarities and Differences– National Fragile X Syndrome

The Fragile X Syndrome Autism Comorbidity: What do we really know? – National Institute of Health

What can we learn about Autism from studying Fragile X Syndrome?– Developmental Neuroscience

 

Self- Injurious Behavior Resources

Working with individuals- both children and adults diagnosed with self-injurious behaviors can be challenging at the very least. Some examples of self-injurious behaviors include head banging, handbiting, and excessive scratching. There are many reasons why a student or individual may cause self-injurious behaviors including the inability to communicate needs, the environment, sensory issues and physiological issues. The following are articles on identifying cause of self-injury and ways to prevent it.

Autism, head banging and other self-harming behaviors– Autism Parenting

3 techniques to stop self-injurious behavior of children with autism– Steinberg Behavior Solutions

6 Strategies for Addressing Self-Injurious Behaviors– Wonderbaby

Effective evidence-based strategies to minimize self-injurious behaviors in young children with autism- CSUSB Scholarworks

Essential guide to self-injurious behavior and autism– Research Autism

Head banging, self-injury and aggression in autism– Treat Autism

Self-injurious behavior in people with developmental disabilities-crisis prevention.com

Self-injury in patients with intellectual disabilities- Nursing2020

Understanding and treating self-injurious behavior– Autism Research Institute

Understanding self-injury among autistic individuals- Good Therapy

 

Understanding and Treating Self-Injurious Behavior

Understanding and Treating Self-Injurious Behavior

Fragile X Syndrome Teaching Strategies Resources

Fragile X Syndrome is a genetic disorder and is the most common form of inherited intellectual and developmental disability. It is estimated to affect 1 in 4,000 males and 1 in 8,000 females. Characteristics include learning disorders, sensory issues, speech and language and attention disorders.

Learning challenges include, difficulty in processing information, understanding concepts, poor abstract thinking and cognitive delays. The following sites provide information on teaching students with Fragile X Syndrome.

Best Practice in Educational, Strategies and Curricula (National Fragile X Foundation)

Education Planning for Fragile X Syndrome for Patients (UPMC Children’s Hospital of Pittsburg)

Fragile X in the Classroom (TeAchnology)

Fragile X Syndrome Teaching Strategies and Resources (Teacher’s Gateway to Special Education)

General Educational Guidelines for Students with Fragile X Syndrome (National Fragile X Foundation)

Student Teaching Tips: Helping your students with Fragile X (Magoosh)

Strategies for Learning and Teaching (National Council for Special Education)

Social Anxiety Traits Overlap Between Fragile X Syndrome, Autism Spectrum Disorder

Published by: Fragile X News Today
Written by: Vijaya Iyer

Social anxiety and autistic traits are prevalent in males with fragile X syndrome and these behaviors overlap with those observed in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) without a known genetic syndrome, a study reports.

The overlap of traits between the two clinical subgroups makes their measurement extremely challenging, researchers said.

The study, “Biobehavioral composite of social aspects of anxiety in young adults with fragile X syndrome contrasted to autism spectrum disorder,” was published in the American Journal of Medical Genetics. Click here to read the rest of the story

27 Things to Know About Fragile X Syndrome

Click here to download a PDF version

  1. It is a genetic condition
  2. Males are more affected than females
  3. Seizures occur in about 15% of males and 5% of females
  4. 1/3 individuals have similar characteristics of autism
  5. Features may include long and narrow face. large ears prominent jaw and flat feet
  6. Fragile X occurs in approximately 1 in 4,000 males and 1 in 8,000 females
  7. Symptoms oftn often include mild to moderate intellectual disability
  8. Child with Fragile X tend to have short attention span
  9. Self-talk is common using different tones and pitches
  10. In 1969, Herbert Lubs first discovered an unusual markers X chromosome in association with an intellectual disability.
  11. In 1970, Frederick Hecht coined the term Fragile site
  12. In 1985 Felix F. De La Cruz outlined physical. psychological, characteristics of those
  13. It is inherited
  14. Early signs may include developmental delays such as late developmental in sitting, walking, etc.
  15. In 1943, James, Purdon Martin and Julia Bell described a pedigree of the x-linked mental disability
  16. Fragile X is caused by a mutation in a single gene.
  17. Fragile X is also called Martin-Bell Syndrome
  18. Fragile X Syndrome has been found in all major ethnic groups and races
  19. Fragile x is the most common form of inherited developmental disability
  20. Fragile X is often mis-diagnosed
  21. It is formally named Martin-Bell
  22. It was first discovered  in 1943
  23. It is found in all races and socio-economic levels
  24. It varies from borderline to severe
  25. Diagnosis of Fragile X is due through DNA test and genetic counseling
  26. Fragile X changes can occur from one generation to the next
  27. Fragile X is inherited through the mother