15 Resources on Cerebral Palsy and Adulthood

Cerebral palsy is a condition caused by damage to the specific areas of the brain. Cerebral palsy refers to the brain and palsy to muscle weakness. Cerebral palsy is a syndrome of motor impairment with posture and movement disorder. It is a non-progressive disorder, however, as a person begins to age, muscle and skeletal problems begin to worsen resulting in more pain, discomfort and limited mobility. Due to muscle flexibility, strength and endurance issues, there is a greater risk of falls and injuries. The following articles includes information on understanding how aging and adulthood affect people with cerebral palsy.

5 common challenges for adults with cerebral palsy- Made For Movement Blog

Adults and cerebral palsy– Cerebral Palsy Organization

Adults with Cerebral Palsy- Cerebral Palsy Foundation

Aging with Cerebral Palsy and Chronic Pain– The Mighty

Care of adults with cerebral palsy-American Academy for Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine

Cerebral Palsy and aging– Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology

Cerebral palsy and transitioning to adulthood-Cerebral Palsy Alliance

Cerebral Palsy effects through lifespan-Physiopedia

Cerebral Palsy in Adulthood– Everyday Health

Cerebral Palsy patients provide rare insight into aging– Cerebral Palsy News Today

Cerebral palsy symptoms in Adulthood- Healthfully

Living as an adult with cerebral palsy– Healthline

Living with cerebral palsy as an adult– WebMD

Progression and Correction of Deformities in Adult with Cerebral Palsy-ACNR

The good, the bad, and the ugly facts about adult cerebral palsy-Karen Pape

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Increased resources, support needed for individuals with autism as they age: report

Published By: Global News
Written By: Michelle McQuigge

A think tank formed to understand the challenges faced by autistic seniors says there are few resources in place to address their specific needs.

A new report from the Aging and Autism Think Tank says the vast majority of research and programming geared toward autism focuses on children, leaving adults almost entirely out of the conversation. The study – compiled by academics, clinicians and autistic adults from five different countries and released by Autism Canada – says autistic people lose access to key resources once they age out of childhood and contends the problem intensifies the older they get. Click here to read the rest of the story.

 

Adults with Special Needs and Housing Options

For many years, most people with developmental disability had only the option of living at home with family or become institutionalized. Today, people are given many more housing options. Although there is still a challenge in finding the right fit, home opportunities are more available. The following are housing options for adults with special needs.

Living with parents or family

Adults with special needs may choose to live at home with their families as long as they can. In some cases, adults with developmental disabilities continue to live at home after their parent’s death by hiring a Personal care Attendant (PCA). A PCA is hired by a person with a disability to assist with his or her personal care routine. People are eligible for this service is they qualify for Medicaid if they have a severe, chronic disability and requires physical assistance for personal care.

Section 811

The Section 811 program allows persons with disabilities to live as independently as possible in the community by subsidizing rental housing opportunities which provide access to appropriate supportive services. Serves extremely low-income individuals with serious and long-term disabilities, including physical or developmental disabilities as well as mental illness.

  • Is designed to accommodate the special needs of such persons;
  • Makes available supportive services that address the individual health, mental health and other needs of such persons; and
  • Promotes and facilitates community integration for people with significant and long-term disabilities.”

Group Homes

Residential home which provides 24-hour support services in a group setting. Oversight, training and supervision are provided by staff employed by a provider agency. This type of facility is provided to those with significant health and/or safety needs.

Individual Supports

Are limited to 3 or fewer individuals and provide need-based support and services for those living in their own homes or apartments, but do not require 24-hour staff support and supervision.

Assisted living communities,

  • also referred to as supported care facilities, provide care to older adults who are unable to live independently, often needing assistance with ADLs. Most offer private and semi-private apartment-style living often containing a living area and kitchenette.

 

Happy Holidays!

 

HAPPY HOLIDAYS2015

Special Needs Resource Blog will take a break during the holidays and will return Monday, January 4, 2016 with new information, tools and resources to post including more downloadable free tools and templates Monday thru Thursday. I am excited and look forward to sharing more resources with you in the new year.
Thanks to all of you for following my blog this year. Wishing you and your families joy and peace all through the holidays and throughout the new year. May the spirit of the holidays be with you throughout the new year.  🙂   🙂

 

Special Needs Dental Resources

Special Care Dentistry Association

Patients with Special Needs Fact Sheet- University of Washington

Professional Dental Care for Special Needs Patients 

Special Needs Fact Sheet

Article- Before You Pick a Dentist for your Child with Special Needs

Developmental Disabilities and Oral Care-National Institute of Health

Office of People with Developmental Disabilities Training Material

Happy Holidays

The Special Needs Blog wishes you and yours a happy holiday!

happy holidays

Cold Weather Precautions Resources

Mayo Clinic- safety tips for exercising outdoors

Winter preparedness tips for persons with disabilities

Winter storm safety checklist

Wind Chill Chart

Tips for Winter Weather Preparedness for People with Disabilities