Indepedence In The Morning

Published By: Rainbows Are Too Beautiful

Mornings in our home are a sort of regimented chaos.  Three kids who all require some form of supervision, two schools to get to and all their gear. Although my kids may seem old enough to be doing a lot of the morning routine themselves, they have a few challenges

Anthony is 10 with autism and ADHD and although he goes to a mainstream school, he needs a lot more support than his peers to focus on and do things.  David is seven, and he attends a specialist autism unit.  His communication is extremely limited which can make doing anything challenging. Jane is five years old – she’s just entered Year 1.

In the past year I’ve learned more and more although the responsibility of getting all my kids out of the house and to school lies with me – I don’t have to do everything.  And the best way of doing this is to help each of my kids be more independent in their morning routine, helping each where they need it most.  Doing this means thinking about ways to help them develop their own skills.  Here’s some of the ideas we have used. Click here to read the rest of the story.

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4 Tips On Winter Safety For Individuals With Disabilities

Individuals with developmental disabilities have a greater chance of being impacted by the cold weather. for example people with disabilities are at a higher risk for hypothermia. Hypothermia is defines as a condition in which the body core temperature drops below the required temperature for bodily functions. Here are 5 tips on winter safety:

  1. Register with the Special Needs Registry for Disaster. This allows residents with disabilities and their families and caregivers an opportunity to provide information to emergency response agencies so emergency responders can better serve people during a disaster. The information is shared with local, state and federal agencies.
  2. For people using a wheelchair, make sure to wrap a small blanket around your legs by tucking it underneath the chair. This will help to maintain body heat.
  3. Wear multiple layers of clothing including a scarf around your neck, a winter hat and two pairs of socks.
  4. In the event of a winter storm, make sure your home is stocked with flashlights/batteries, non-electric can opener, bottled water, extra blankets and a first aid kit.

How To Organize Clothing In A Residential Setting

Organizing clothes in a regular household can be challenging. Imagine striving to clean, organize and store clothes when it is 12 people living under one roof! This can often lead to clothing getting mixed up causing further confusion.

There are a number of steps you can take that will help to alleviate this often challenging task:

  1. Create an inventory list for each person. This list should include a tri-annual schedule when clothing are sorted. Choose a time in the spring, fall and winter when to sort out clothing. An inventory list should also list the types of clothing and the number of items for each. Below is an example of an inventory.  You will find a free template here: clothing_inventory
  2. Spend a day with each person and go through the closet taking everything out. Sort the clothing and throw out anything that is torn or broken. People may have a favorite item they might like to wear. Look to see if it can get either fixed or replaced
  3. Once clothing is organized, choose a day with the person and determine a laundry day. While it can be easier to try to do wash clothing for several people at a time, you risk the chance of mixing up clothing.
  4. Always make sure if possible, the person participates as much as they can in this household task. It encourages independence and individuality at the same time.

I like to hear tips you use for clothing organizing for multiple people.

 

 

26 Great Resources on Special Needs Clothing

Children and adults with disabilities with sensory issues, autism, ADHD, down syndrome and cerebral palsy often find challenges in finding clothing that meets the need of feeling good and appropriate.

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Challenges may also include difficulties in handling buttons and closures. Here are 25 resources that focus on shoes, outerwear, and adaptive clothing.

Adaptive Clothing

Adaptations By Adrian- Adaptive clothing including side zippers, wide band elastic waist for custom-made capes, wheelchair, pants, shorts adult protectors and cape protecting scarf.

CAPR-Style– Located in the U.K, adaptive clothing for adults and children including feeding tube covers.

Designed By Dignity– Adaptive clothing fashion clothes for men and women.

Down Design Dream– Adapting Clothing for children and adults with special needs

Easy Access Clothing– Adaptive clothing for adults and children.

Professional Fit Clothing– Adaptive clothing for adults and children including adults bibs, clothing protectors and nightware.

Rackety’s- Based in the U.K, products include adaptive clothing for children and adults such as vests, outdoor clothing, and nightwear.

Something Sew Special– Handmade adaptive clothing for children with special needs including bibs, ponchos, bodysuits and bandanas.

Special Kids Companywhere every child should be seen and not hidden!  International provider of bodysuits for older children with special needs including PEG/tube fed children aged 2-14 years old.  Available on all Amazon platforms (.com/.ca/.co.uk/.fr/.de/.es/.it)

Specially For You Inc.– Custom clothing for children with physical disabilities. Products include night wear, dresses, tops, one piece outfits and hooded poncho’s.

Tender Ivy– Onesie garment designed for protecting vulnerable areas.

Wonsie– Based in Australia, products include special needs onesie bodysuits for older children and adults.

Sensory Clothing

Children and adults with sensory processing issues may find it difficult wearing certain types of clothing. The following stores sell items that are for sensitive skin, medically fragile and pressure points.

Cool Vest– products includes children’s cooling vest.

Independent You– Adaptive outerwear, sportswear and sleepwear.

Kozie Clothes– Adaptive medical and sensory clothing for medically fragile and special needs babies and children.

No Netz– Anti-chafe swimwear for boys and men.

SmartKnit Kids– Seamless products for children with sensory issues. Products include, socks, undies, tees and bralettes.

World’s Softest– Socks for sensitive skin

Shoes for AFO’s

The following are stores that sell shoes that fit over orthotics.

Ablegaitor- Orthopedic shoes for children. Can be used without AFO’s.

Hatchbacks– Children’s orthopedic shoes for use with orthotics.

Healthy Feet Store– An online orthopedic shoe and footcare store including AFO’s accommodations.

Keeping Pace– Children’s orthopedic footwear designed for AFO’s.

Shoby Shoes– Custom-made orthopedic shoes and support boots for special needs children

Soft Star Shoes– Will customize shoes to work wit AFO’s and DAFO’s.

Coats for Wheelchairs

Coats for individuals who use wheelchairs  made need special clothing. The following online stores, specialize in adaptive outerwear for children and adults.

Koolway Sports– Based in Ontario, Canada, Koolway Sports items include blankets, hoods, and capes.

Silvert’s– Adaptive clothing for men and women including footwear and wheelchair clothing.

Weighted Vest

Weighed vest can be used for children and adults with autism, ADHD, Cerebral Palsy, Muscular Dystrophy and a sensory processing disorder.

e-Special Needs– provides a selection of weighted vests and clothing

Fun and Function– Includes items such as explorers vest, fleece hoodies and compression vests.