12 Tips for Teaching Tactile Skills to Struggling Braille Readers

Collage of 12 tips for teaching tactile skills to struggling braille readers
Source: Paths to Literacy

Struggling braille readers may easily become frustrated or discouraged, so it’s critical to find ways to ensure success whenever possible. ┬áHere are some strategies to promote tactile skills with struggling braille readers:

  1. Implement a variety of tactile activities throughout the daily schedule. Students need practice not just reading braille, but also using tactile information.
    • Put an article in a bag and have the student remove it and describe it – NOT tell you what it is. Ask them to think about questions, such as how much does it weigh, how long, what shape, what else might be like this, what is the purpose of the item, how is it different from yesterday’s item, etc. This is a good starter for lessons, introducing seasons of the year, special events, common knowledge, etc.
    • I recall putting a boat in the bag when the movie Titanic was showing.
    • Another example would be a stapler, and then to teach students how to use it. By third grade kids need to use one daily to help their teacher pair braille and print pages.
    • A pen and pencil can help to teach likenesses and differences.
    • Every fruit imaginable showed up in the bag and then we had tasting parties one year.
    • Toys like a yo-yo, or other toys of the day can be put in the bag.
    • Students must answer in complete sentences (no one word answers). In fact students should be taught to respond to all questions in complete sentences.
    • All this ties into improving sentence structure, writing, common knowledge, and even social skills.

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