Cerebral Palsy- Facts and Statistics

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Cerebral Palsy (CP) is a group of disorders that affect a person’s ability to move and maintain balance and posture. It is the most common motor disability in childhood. It is estimated that an average of 1 in 345 children in the U.S. have cerebral palsy

The following are facts and statistics worldwide on cerebral palsy:

  • Around 764,000 people in the United states have at least one symptom of cerebral palsy
  • Around 10,000 babies are born each year with cerebral palsy
  • Boys are diagnosed more often than girls
  • Cerebral palsy is the mot commonly diagnosed childhood motor disability in the United States
  • Over 77% of children with cerebral palsy have the spastic form
  • More than 50% of all children with cerebral palsy can walk independently
  • African American children with cerebral palsy are 1.7 times more likely to need assistance with walking or be unable to walk at all
  • Around 41% of babies and children with cerebral palsy will have limited abilities in crawling, walking and running.
  • Around 41% children with cerebral palsy in the United states have some form of a cognitive disorder
  • Behavior problems are common in children with cerebral palsy including social skills and anger issues.
  • Seizures are a common associate disorder of cerebral palsy and can range from mild to extreme severe.
  • There is no known cure
Australia Facts and Statistics
  • 1 in 700 Australian babies is diagnosed each year
  • 1 in 2 is in chronic pain
  • 1 in 2 has an intellectual disability
  • 1 in 3 cannot walk
  • 1 in 4 also has epilepsy
  • 1 in 3 has hip displacement
  • 1 in 4 cannot talk
  • 1 in 4 has a behavior disorder
  • 1 in 5 is tube fed
  • 1 in 5 has a sleep disorder
  • 1 in 10 has a severe vision impairment
  • 1 in 25 has a severe hearing impairment
United Kingdom- Facts and Statistics
  • The current United Kingdom incidence rate is around 1 in 400 births
  • Approximately 1800 children are diagnosed with cerebral palsy each year
  • There are an estimated 30,000 children with cerebral palsy in the United Kingdom
  • For every 100 girls with cerebral palsy, there are 135 boys with cerebral palsy
  • just under half of children with cerebral palsy were born prematurely
  • One in three children with cerebral palsy is unable to walk
  • One in four children with cerebral palsy cannot feed or dress themselves
  • one in four children with cerebral palsy has a learning disability
  • one in fifty children with cerebral palsy has a hearing impairment

 

Resources

Cerebral Palsy Alliance-Australia

Cerebral Palsy Guidance

The Pace Centre Organization

Dancing with a purpose: Woman with down syndrome teaches dance class

Published by: Fox News
Written by: Meg Gatto

NEW ORLEANS (WVUE) – The young dancers at the Martha Mayer School of Dance perfect their craft, nailing every step along the way. While the goal is to blend in with the team, there’s one person in the sea of black leotards who stands out because of what she’s had to overcome to get there. 21-year old Tess Landry is an assistant dance instructor at the Martha Mayer School of Dance. She also has down syndrome. “I love to dance so much and it makes me so happy and i just feel something in my heart from it,” said Landry. Tess’ mother, Angel Landry, said that enrolling her at the Martha Mayer School of Dance 18 years ago was a gamble and that they didn’t know if it would even work. Gina Iserman, co-owner of the School of Dance, however, said that Tess is just like everyone else. Click here to read the rest of the story.

 

Self- Injurious Behavior Resources

Working with individuals- both children and adults diagnosed with self-injurious behaviors can be challenging at the very least. Some examples of self-injurious behaviors include head banging, handbiting, and excessive scratching. There are many reasons why a student or individual may cause self-injurious behaviors including the inability to communicate needs, the environment, sensory issues and physiological issues. The following are articles on identifying cause of self-injury and ways to prevent it.

Autism, head banging and other self-harming behaviors– Autism Parenting

3 techniques to stop self-injurious behavior of children with autism– Steinberg Behavior Solutions

6 Strategies for Addressing Self-Injurious Behaviors– Wonderbaby

Effective evidence-based strategies to minimize self-injurious behaviors in young children with autism- CSUSB Scholarworks

Essential guide to self-injurious behavior and autism– Research Autism

Head banging, self-injury and aggression in autism– Treat Autism

Self-injurious behavior in people with developmental disabilities-crisis prevention.com

Self-injury in patients with intellectual disabilities- Nursing2020

Understanding and treating self-injurious behavior– Autism Research Institute

Understanding self-injury among autistic individuals- Good Therapy

 

Understanding and Treating Self-Injurious Behavior

Understanding and Treating Self-Injurious Behavior

Mothers of Children With CP Say Depression, Fatigue Hurt Quality of Life, Study Finds

Published by: Cerebral Palsy News Today
Written by: Charlotte Baker

Depression, burden of care, and fatigue all hamper quality of life for mothers of children with cerebral palsy (CP), a study found.

A “holistic approach” including training in managing children with CP along with “psychological interventions” would improve quality of life for these mothers, the researchers said.

The study, “Factors associated with quality of life among mothers of children with cerebral palsy,” was published in the International Journal of Nursing Practice. 

Researchers in Iran asked mothers to complete a series of questionnaires to evaluate the impact of fatigue, depression, and burden of care on their quality of life (QoL).

“The burden of caregiving can adversely affect the physical, psychosocial, and mental health of caregivers, leading to poor quality of care and unmet patient need,” the researchers said. Click here to read the rest of the story.

 

March Day Habilitation Activity Ideas

March is the month of spring! A time to also develop creative ideas for St. Patrick Day and to recognize Cerebral Palsy Awareness Month, Trisomy Awareness Month, World Down Syndrome Day and Intellectual and Developmental Disability Awareness Month. Oops, I almost forgot about Purple Day for Epilepsy! a day for both staff and individuals to wear purple to program. The following are March observances, celebrations, events, and holidays to be used as ideas for your day habilitation program.

Click to download here

Teaching Children and Adults with Rare Diseases

February 28th is the official day of bringing awareness to rare diseases. According to the National Institutes of Health, in the United States, a rare disease is defined as a condition that affects fewer than 200,000 people. Definition of rare disease vary from country to county. In Europe affect 1in 2,000 people and in Canada, more than 3.5 million or 10percent of the population are diagnosed with a rare disease.

Facts You Should Know About Rare Diseases

  • There are over 300 million people living with one or more of over 6,000 identified rare diseases around the world
  • Each rare disease may only affect a handful of people but taken together directly affected is equivalent to the population of the world’s third largest country.
  • rare diseases currently affect 3.5%-5.9% of the worldwide population.
  • 72% of rare diseases are genetic while others are the result of infections.(bacterial or viral).
  • 70% of those genetic diseases start in childhood
  • About 30 million people or 1 in 10 people in the United States are affected by a rare disease
  • 95% of rare diseases do not have FDA-approval treatment.

Most children diagnosed with rare diseases are more than likely to also exhibit some form of learning disabilities including intellectual disabilities, developmental delays, speech and motor issues. Also, you may find in addition to an intellectual disabilities, students may also have medical issues including epilepsy and ongoing medical concerns.

While it is impossible to know and remember all of the signs and symptoms of rare diseases, the key is to teaching students based on their level of development. The following are useful teaching strategies when teaching students diagnosed with a rare disease:

  1. Teaching should include using multisensory teaching strategies by engaging students on multiple levels by encouraging students to use their senses. This is done by utilizing learning that includes visual (text, pictures, flash cards), auditory (music, songs),tactile (textured items, clay), kinesthetic (games, movement activities), taste ( cooking activities).
  2. Use concrete items and give examples
  3. Use hands on material as much as possible
  4. Break longer, new task into smaller task. Use task analysis.
  5. In some instances, children may have tactile and sensory issues.Signs include over and under reacting to pain, avoiding messy textures, picky eaters, and reacting to loud and sudden noises. Strategies include using a sensory diet and create activities using play doh or silly putty.

The following are articles and links to further information on rare diseases found in this blog:

Aicardi Syndrome– A rare genetic disorder that occurs in 1 in 105,000 to 167,000 newborns in the United states and occurs exclusively in females. People with Aicardi Syndrome often have undeveloped tissue which connects the left and right halves of the brain.

Angelman Syndrome– A genetic disorder that affects the nervous system. Characteristics include developmental delays, intellectual disabilities and speech impairments.

Chromosome 22q11.2 (DiGeorge Syndrome)- a rare disorder that is caused by deletion in chromosome 22 located specifically in the middle of the chromosome in the area. It affects 1 out of 4,000 births. Symptoms include developmental delays, poor muscle tone, learning development and feeding issues.

Cri Du Chat– A rare genetic disorder that results when a piece of the 5p Chromosome is deleted. Characteristics include intellectual disability, hyperactivity, and developmental delay.

Dravet Syndrome– A rare form of epilepsy found in children. Symptoms include developmental delays, sleeping conditions, and chronic infections.

Duchenne Muscular– Occurs in 1 out of 3,600 male infants and is characterized by progressive muscle degeneration. early signs include muscle weakness in the hips, pelvic area, thighs and shoulder affecting delayed motor skills, sitting and walking.

Landau Kleffner– Characterized by the gradual or sudden loss of language in children between the ages of 5 and 7.

Lowe Syndrome– Is a rare genetic disorder that affects the eyes, brain and kidneys. It has a prevalence of 1 in 500,000 and mainly affects males.

Prader Willi– A genetic disorder resulting from an abnormality of chromosome 15. It is found in 1 in 20,000 births affecting both sexes. It is also the most common recognized genetic form of obesity.

Rett Syndrome– A neurodevelopmental disorder occurring mostly in females in which the child exhibits reduce muscle tone, and autistic-like behaviors including hand movements consisting of wringing and waving. It is a rare disorder that affects about 1 out of 10,000 children.

Williams Syndrome– A rare disorder with a prevalence of 1 in 7,500 to 20,000 caused by the deletion of genetic material from chromosome 7. Signs and symptoms include moderate intellectual disabilities and learning disabilities.

 

Teaching Counting to Special Needs Students

Teaching individuals to count is an early prerequisite to working on money skills. Before starting to work on a counting goals, students should be able to count numbers 1- 100. Make sure to break any counting activities into short, easy-to-manage steps and provide clear expectations.

6 methods for teaching money counting-Thought Co.

7 ways to teaching counting to 100- Raising Da Vinci

10 tips to teach numbers and alphabets to children with autism– The Learning App

Counting Strategies– National Council of Teachers of Mathematics

Easy way to teach preschool children to count– VeryWell

Math: Counting and Comparing– The Yale Center for Dyslexia and Creativity

Skip Counting for Autism– Autism Educators

Teaching Counting- The Autism Helper

Teaching Counting Skills– The Autism Helper

Teaching Counting– National Center on Intensive Intervention

Free Printable Angleman Syndrome Factsheet

English pediatrician, Dr. Harry Angleman first described Angelman syndrome in 1965 when he observed 3 children who had similar features including unusual happiness, developmental delays and similar facial disorders. He originally called it the “Happy Puppet Syndrome” based in a 17th century Italian painting by Gian Francesco Coroto. In most cases, a gene located on chromosome 15 is generally missing or damaged, in some cases, the individual may have 2 copies of the paternal chromosome 15. It is considered a developmental disability where children and adults will require ongoing services. Click the link below to download the factsheet.

Download factsheet here

Don’t leave employees with dyspraxia out in the cold

Published by: Real Business Company
Written by: Annie May Noonan

he fact that a dyspraxia sufferer isn’t easy to define makes the job of being understood and supported difficult for those with the condition – and I would know.

I was diagnosed with dyspraxia and dyscalculia at the age of eight after my physical balance and concentration levels suddenly, and very rapidly, deteriorated.

From the outside, I made the transition from my junior to ‘senior’ school as an atypical student, able to play sport and complete both writing tasks and times-tables well. My inability to dress or pack my school bag myself didn’t seem like a big issue until I suddenly could no longer retain my balance and started walking into doors, and falling down flights of stairs. I also developed problems writing and was unable to sit on a chair properly.

After my dual diagnosis, my frustrations around the difficulties I was experiencing lessened. I felt a sense of calm and clarity in the fact I had a condition, and could now learn strategies to make living with it less stressful. After seeing an occupational therapist for a year, I was able to manage my condition, however, my dyspraxia hasn’t gone away. Click here to read the rest of the story/

Attention Skills Strategies

Attention is defined as the ability to keep the mind on something and the ability to concentrate. Skills often include careful observation or listening. The ability for a student to sustain attention, motivation, language, and sensory intervention. Children with autism, ADHD, intellectual disabilities, executive functioning disorders, and Cri du Chat have difficulty sustaining attention over a long period of time.

Strategies they may provide to be useful include:

  • Eye Contact
  • Repeat instructions
  • Provide frequent breaks
  • Use in a leadership role.
  • Provide choices in test-taking
  • Ongoing prompting.

The following are articles on ways to improve concentration and attention:

4 concentration activities for students – Getting Smart

7 in-class activities to improve concentration in children-TEACH

10 Games to boost attention and focus– Heart-Mind Online

Attention Activities– The OT Toolbox

Activities that help develop attention skills– Boise Speech and Hearing Clinic

Attention and Concentration– Kidsense

Brain training activities– Our Journey Westward

Pay attention: Ten steps to improving attention and concentration- ADHD Center

The attention games: Catching focus through fun– Additude

Using play to increase attention– Miss Jaime OT