Why Special Needs Moms Are Exhausted All The Time, But Will Never Ask For Help

Why special needs moms are so exhausted all the time, but they'll never tell you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source( Life Over C’s)

“You drink a lot of coffee.” Yep. I do. I hear that one little sentence all the time. The problem is most people don’t want to hear the explanation. Daily life with a special needs child is a series of rapid fire, interrogations that a parent can never answer correctly. In fact, special needs moms have been found to have similar levels of stress-hormones to combat soldiers. I’ve never been in combat, but I do know what PTSD from stress feels like. I know people don’t want to hear this. People are busy. People are tired. But most people are not this tired. Most people are not ‘5-cups-of-coffee-just-to-keep-their-eyes-propped-open’ tired. Special needs moms are exhausted all.the.time…..but will never ask for help. Click here for the rest of the story.

Toddlers with Autism Indifferent to Eye Contact, Study Says


Source: (Spectrum News)
Author: Sarah Deweedt

Toddlers with autism are oblivious to the social information in the eyes, but don’t actively avoid meeting another person’s gaze, according to a new study1.

The findings support one side of a long-standing debate: Do children with autism tend not to look others in the eye because they are uninterested or because they find eye contact unpleasant?

“This question about why do we see reduced eye contact in autism has been around for a long time,” says study leader Warren Jones, director of research at the Marcus Autism Center in Atlanta, Georgia. “It’s important for how we understand autism, and it’s important for how we treat autism.” T read the rest of the article, click link here.

How to Avoid Autism Scams

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Source: (Very Well)
Author: Lisa Jo Rudy

Autism is a complicated and poorly understood disorder.  No one knows, for sure, what causes most cases of autism — and there is no established cure.  No one can tell you how well a particular child will respond to a particular therapy, or how far they’ll go in life.  With so much uncertainty, many people are desperate for “definite” information.  As a result, people living with autism are often the target of scams which offer just such certainty. For rest of article, click link here

December Special Needs Article Links

specialneedslinks

Welcome to the December links. These are articles that I tweeted and or received from viewers during the month of December on special needs and developmental disability topics. Enjoy!

10 good reasons to hire a person with Asperger’s (Hub Pages)

How to decrease tactile defensiveness in children with sensory processing disorder (Brain Balance)

Is there a link between sensory processing disorder and anxiety? (Psych Central)

Local yoga instructor brings yoga to classrooms (Learning Success)

People with autism make more logical decisions (The Conversation)

Points to consider when choosing materials (Active Learning Space)

Simple ways to help your child with ASD sleep without medicine (Autism Parenting Magazine)

Top 10 children’s books for kids with ADHD, learning differences and sensory processing disorder (Brain Balance)

What does success mean for an autistic woman? (Network Autism)

What it feels like to receive an Asperger’s diagnosed later in life (The Guardian)

What it’s like to be married to an ADHD husband (Attitude)

How A Transition Coordinator Can Prepare Your Child For Life After School

How a Transition Coordinator Can Prepare Your Child for Life After School
Source: (Friendship Circle)

The transition from high school to whatever comes next can be stressful for students with special needs and their parents. Guiding them through this passage is a school transition coordinator or specialist. If you haven’t made contact with this individual at your teen’s school yet, don’t wait.

I had my first meeting with our high-school transition coordinator, Barbara Milewski, when my daughter was still in middle school. I wanted to find out what I should be worrying about and planning for. Not only did she reduce my anxiety, she also pointed me toward a county agency that gave my daughter a job that summer. As school meetings go, that one was unusually productive.

Since many parents don’t know such a resource exists, I asked Mrs. Milewski — who has decades of experience helping young people through this transition as a district guidance counselor, school social worker, case manager for special-education students, and transition coordinator — to share a little bit about what transition coordinators do and why you should seek yours out. Click here to read the rest of the story.

What Does Sensory Processing Look Like In Adults?

Sensory Processing Disorder in Adults
Source: (ADDitude)

Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) manifests in many small, sometimes maddening ways. Itchy tags may be unbearable. Loud music intolerable. Perfume simply sickening. Whatever the specific symptoms, SPD makes it difficult to interact with your daily environment. This impacts how you relate to others, study and learn, participate in sports and group activities, and follow your dreams. It is a unique and challenging neurological condition associated with inefficient processing of sensory information, and it deserves serious support.

SPD disrupts how the brain — the top of the central nervous system — takes in, organizes, and uses the messages received through our body’s receptors. We take in sensory information through our eyes, ears, muscles, joints, skin and inner ears, and we use those sensations – we integrate them, modulate them, analyze them and interpret them — for immediate and appropriate everyday functioning. Click here to read the rest of the story.

The Challenges of Being a Hyperactive Grown-Up

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Source: (Hong Kong Free Press)

Under the dim yellowish light, a woman is preparing the bar to welcome its customers later today. She checks there are sufficient bottles of wine, then walks over to another side of the bar to check the roster. From time to time, she takes out her phone and speaks into it, making voice notes. Grace Ma Lai -wah, who owns Club 71 in Central, was diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) just over a decade ago. It means the 63-year-old tends to forget things and relies on her smartphone for reminders. Click here to read the rest of the story.

8 Reasons Why You Should Hire Someone With Asperger’s Syndrome

penelope trunk
Source: (Life Hack)

When you hear the word Asperger’s, what kind of person do you think of?

Asperger’s Syndrome (ASP) is a type of mild autism that affects an average of 1 in 88 children in the US. In popular media, there are certain stereotypes attributed to people with Asperger’s (just think of Sheldon Cooper from TV’s Big Bang Theory). Often, due to their unusual gifts and behavior, highly creative and gifted people are labeled with Asperger’s, especially if they are socially awkward.

Furthermore, there’s been a trend recently where “experts” diagnose famous people with Asperger’s posthumously. The list of “diagnosed” includes Abraham Lincoln, Albert Einstein, George Washington, and many others. Obviously, such post-mortem diagnoses are nonsense. Diagnosing Asperger’s is a difficult process and such diagnosis can only be established by psychiatrists or psychologists. They typically use specialized psychoeducational assessments to diagnose Asperger’s syndrome. To read the rest of the story, Click Here

November Special Needs Article Links

specialneedslinks

Welcome to the November links. These are articles that I tweeted and or received from viewers during the month of November on special needs and developmental disability topics. Enjoy!

5 simple but important ways to help include kids with autism

14-Year Old with Asperger’s syndrome makes debut as an author

Activism and Advocacy- The Road from here to now

Autism: Parents face challenges too

Autism is seen as a male thing- but girls just implode emotionally

Children with autism may be over-diagnosed with ADHD: Study

Concussions are more prevalent in teens with ADHD

Dealing with sensory overload during the holidays

Employers are letting down people with autism

Mother and daughter share their struggles with dyslexia

Not letting ADHD get in the way of managing a business

Supreme Court hears service dog case

Utah adolescents with autism get own ‘high school,’ prevocational education

Woman with Down syndrome becomes the first teacher in Latin America

3 Ways Technology Can Help Students With Autism

Image result for technology
(Article Source: Ed Tech)

It is a statistic that most Americans would probably be stunned to find is so prevalent: One of out every 68 kids in the United States is on the autism spectrum, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. While it’s true that most children these days are considered “digital natives,” children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) also find themselves most comfortable with a device in their hands.

In an article for the Indiana Resource Center for Autism, author Kristie Brown Lofland notes that children with ASD are visual learners, which means technology can be a valuable tool in the learning process.

“Technology just makes visual images more accessible to the individual with ASD. Computer graphics capture and maintain their attention,” Lofland writes. Click here to read the rest of the story.