Getting Self Help With ADHD

Published by: ADHD Man of DistrAction
Written by: Kelly Babcock

I’ve had ADHD all my life, I guess. Though, of course, when I was younger it would have been harder to detect, since both childhood and ADHD are afflictions denoted by being not completely developed yet.

The first sad thing about that statement is that it makes people think that we are childish.

The second, but bigger sad thing about that statement is that the childish thing is, though damned insulting, also accurate.

I mean, technically, of course.

Truth of it …

There is a freedom of spirit that comes with ADHD that we enjoy and that others are attracted to. We attract people because we are fun and somewhat exciting to be around.

Life is not dull around us. A person with ADHD can be a vortex of activity, a tornado of plans and schemes and attempts at instant gratification, and impetuous sudden decisions to have fun in yet another way.

All of these things are exactly why children have so much fun. Click here to read the rest of the story

 

Many doctors aren’t addressing safe sex, driver readiness with teens who have a history of ADHD

Published by: Philly Voice
Written by: Tracey Romero

Primary care doctors need to more closely monitor the health risks of teenagers with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, particularly in regard to two classic teenage thrills – driving and sex, researchers say.

Children diagnosed with ADHD before age 10 are at increased risk for sexually-transmitted diseases and car accidents, previous research has shown. But a new Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia study found that only 1 in 2 teens with a history of ADHD receives a safe sex talk from their doctor. And far fewer discuss their readiness to drive. “Although doctors do a good job screening for many behavioral health risks, like suicide risk and depression, we need to be more aware of the dangers associated with driving and sexual health,” said Thomas Power, director of CHOP’s Center for Management of ADHD.

“For example, our previous research shows teens with ADHD are more likely to be involved in a car accident particularly in the first month after receiving their driver’s license, so this is definitely an issue that should be discussed with our patients.” Click here to read the rest of the story.

 

Dancing with a purpose: Woman with down syndrome teaches dance class

Published by: Fox News
Written by: Meg Gatto

NEW ORLEANS (WVUE) – The young dancers at the Martha Mayer School of Dance perfect their craft, nailing every step along the way. While the goal is to blend in with the team, there’s one person in the sea of black leotards who stands out because of what she’s had to overcome to get there. 21-year old Tess Landry is an assistant dance instructor at the Martha Mayer School of Dance. She also has down syndrome. “I love to dance so much and it makes me so happy and i just feel something in my heart from it,” said Landry. Tess’ mother, Angel Landry, said that enrolling her at the Martha Mayer School of Dance 18 years ago was a gamble and that they didn’t know if it would even work. Gina Iserman, co-owner of the School of Dance, however, said that Tess is just like everyone else. Click here to read the rest of the story.

 

Mothers of Children With CP Say Depression, Fatigue Hurt Quality of Life, Study Finds

Published by: Cerebral Palsy News Today
Written by: Charlotte Baker

Depression, burden of care, and fatigue all hamper quality of life for mothers of children with cerebral palsy (CP), a study found.

A “holistic approach” including training in managing children with CP along with “psychological interventions” would improve quality of life for these mothers, the researchers said.

The study, “Factors associated with quality of life among mothers of children with cerebral palsy,” was published in the International Journal of Nursing Practice. 

Researchers in Iran asked mothers to complete a series of questionnaires to evaluate the impact of fatigue, depression, and burden of care on their quality of life (QoL).

“The burden of caregiving can adversely affect the physical, psychosocial, and mental health of caregivers, leading to poor quality of care and unmet patient need,” the researchers said. Click here to read the rest of the story.

 

Struggling to be Understood: A Childhood Autism Meltdown

Published by:Different Brains Blog
Written by: Tim Goldstein

Cover Image - Struggling To Be Understood - A Childhood Autism Meltdown

THE MELTDOWN BEGINS

I was at the Boardwalk in Santa Cruz with my wife this past weekend. We were sitting down eating my all-time favorite junk amusement park food, funnel cake. To the side and a little behind me, I started to hear a disturbance. I turned and looked. It was a boy in the 7-9-year-old range with who I assumed to be his mom.

I missed the start of the meltdown which my wife saw from her side of the table. Another boy had come up to the boy making a disturbance and prepared to punch him in the face. My wife said the boy throwing the tantrum had that distinctive, scary 100% focused level of emotion on his face that she knows all too well from my meltdowns over the year. It is a look of every bit of energy being released in total rage.

The other boy left, and the young boy began verbal outbursts directed at his mom that packed all of his intensity into the words. I recognized this as it is a meltdown pattern I have struggled with. I listened in, it was obvious to me that he was having with I call the “straw that broke the camel’s back” type meltdown. This is one of two types of meltdowns and frequently the more troublesome as it appears to be completely out of line with the event that seemed to trigger it. Click here to read the rest of the story

For Those With Autism, Eye Contact Isn’t Just Weird, It’s Distressing

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Published by: Science Alert
Written by: Mike McRae

For many people with autism, avoiding eye contact isn’t a sign that they don’t care – instead, it’s a response to a deeply uncomfortable sensation.

Researchers have discovered a part of the brain responsible for helping newborns turn towards familiar faces is abnormally activated among those on the autism spectrum, suggesting therapies that force eye contact could inadvertently be inducing anxiety.

Autism spectrum disorder is a term used to describe a variety of conditions that make communicating and socialising a challenge, and is often accompanied by restricted and repetitive behaviours.

A defining characteristic of autism spectrum disorder is a difficulty in making or maintaining eye contact, a behaviour that not only makes social interactions harder, but can lead to miscommunication among cultures where eye contact is taken as a sign of trust and respect. Click here to read the rest of the story

Why Special Needs Moms Are Exhausted All The Time, But Will Never Ask For Help

Why special needs moms are so exhausted all the time, but they'll never tell you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source( Life Over C’s)

“You drink a lot of coffee.” Yep. I do. I hear that one little sentence all the time. The problem is most people don’t want to hear the explanation. Daily life with a special needs child is a series of rapid fire, interrogations that a parent can never answer correctly. In fact, special needs moms have been found to have similar levels of stress-hormones to combat soldiers. I’ve never been in combat, but I do know what PTSD from stress feels like. I know people don’t want to hear this. People are busy. People are tired. But most people are not this tired. Most people are not ‘5-cups-of-coffee-just-to-keep-their-eyes-propped-open’ tired. Special needs moms are exhausted all.the.time…..but will never ask for help. Click here for the rest of the story.

Toddlers with Autism Indifferent to Eye Contact, Study Says


Source: (Spectrum News)
Author: Sarah Deweedt

Toddlers with autism are oblivious to the social information in the eyes, but don’t actively avoid meeting another person’s gaze, according to a new study1.

The findings support one side of a long-standing debate: Do children with autism tend not to look others in the eye because they are uninterested or because they find eye contact unpleasant?

“This question about why do we see reduced eye contact in autism has been around for a long time,” says study leader Warren Jones, director of research at the Marcus Autism Center in Atlanta, Georgia. “It’s important for how we understand autism, and it’s important for how we treat autism.” T read the rest of the article, click link here.

How to Avoid Autism Scams

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Source: (Very Well)
Author: Lisa Jo Rudy

Autism is a complicated and poorly understood disorder.  No one knows, for sure, what causes most cases of autism — and there is no established cure.  No one can tell you how well a particular child will respond to a particular therapy, or how far they’ll go in life.  With so much uncertainty, many people are desperate for “definite” information.  As a result, people living with autism are often the target of scams which offer just such certainty. For rest of article, click link here

December Special Needs Article Links

specialneedslinks

Welcome to the December links. These are articles that I tweeted and or received from viewers during the month of December on special needs and developmental disability topics. Enjoy!

10 good reasons to hire a person with Asperger’s (Hub Pages)

How to decrease tactile defensiveness in children with sensory processing disorder (Brain Balance)

Is there a link between sensory processing disorder and anxiety? (Psych Central)

Local yoga instructor brings yoga to classrooms (Learning Success)

People with autism make more logical decisions (The Conversation)

Points to consider when choosing materials (Active Learning Space)

Simple ways to help your child with ASD sleep without medicine (Autism Parenting Magazine)

Top 10 children’s books for kids with ADHD, learning differences and sensory processing disorder (Brain Balance)

What does success mean for an autistic woman? (Network Autism)

What it feels like to receive an Asperger’s diagnosed later in life (The Guardian)

What it’s like to be married to an ADHD husband (Attitude)